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"A man who was completely innocent, offered himself as a sacrifice for the good of others, including his enemies, and became the ransom of the world . It was a perfect act". Mahatma Gandhi 

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Annotated Bibliography of New and Noteworthy Books on Ethiopia Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD


Number of Eritreans seeking asylum in Europe soars over figures for last year
News Stories, 14 November 2014

© UNHCR/A.D'Amato
Two young Eritreans wait to board a commercial ferry at Samos Island, Greece. Growing numbers of Eritreans are seeking asylum in Europe.
GENEVA, November 14 (UNHCR) – The UN refugee agency on Friday said the number of asylum-seekers in Europe from Eritrea over the first 10 months of this year has risen threefold compared to the same period in 2013. In Ethiopia and Sudan, neighboring Eritrea, the number of Eritrean refugees has also increased sharply."So far this year, nearly 37,000 Eritreans have sought refuge in Europe, compared to almost 13,000 during the same period last year. Most asylum requests have been lodged in Sweden, Germany and Switzerland, with the vast majority of the Eritreans having arrived by boat across the Mediterranean," UNHCR spokesman Adrian Edwards told journalists in Geneva.


We can learn a few lessons from Ethiopia
Source: News Day

Ethiopia has not been a good example over the decades despite priding itself of not having been colonised.

DEVELOP ME WITH TAPIWA GOMO
There are number of reasons why the world may not have fairly judged Ethiopia, some of which include the 1984 drought, the incompatibility of their governance to those of the generally acceptable standards. As much as the Western intellectual machinery has imposed the lenses through which we view governance systems, an unquestioned conclusion has been imposed on them and that such governance system is responsible for the high poverty and suffering of Ethiopians. Western scholarship teaches us that leaders must leave office at a certain period of time to allow the country to develop.


Ali Mazrui, Scholar of Africa Who Divided U.S. Audiences, Dies at 81
By DOUGLAS MARTINOCT. 20, 2014 

Ali Mazrui, a scholar and prolific author who set off a tsunami of criticism in 1986 by writing and hosting “The Africans: A Triple Heritage,” a public television series that culminated in what seemed to be an endorsement of African nations’ acquiring nuclear weapons, died on Oct. 12 at his home in Vestal, N.Y. He was 81. His family announced the death without specifying a cause.
Uhuru Kenyatta, the president of Kenya, where Professor Mazrui was born, said at the time of his death that he was “a towering academician whose intellectual contributions played a major role in shaping African scholarship.”“The Africans,” a nine-part series that was originally broadcast by the BBC and later shown on PBS, portrayed Africa as having been defined by the interplay of indigenous, Islamic and Western influences. Professor Mazrui had acquired the perspective by growing up speaking Swahili, practicing Islam and attending an English-speaking school in Mombasa, Kenya. “My three worlds overlapped,” he said in the interview with The Times.


Published on Oct 31, 2014 
Round table discussion with Former TPLF executive Leader, Tigrai Governor and current member and Leader of ARENA a Legal Opposition group in Ethiopia. The discussion was held via a tele conference and was mainly about his latest book "Luelawinet and Democracy in Ethiopia". The interview is presented in a three part series and mainly concentrates on the handling of the Eritrea issue, Democracy in Ethiopia and the challenges that exist today and on Gebru's account about TPLF/EPRDF revolutionary democracy shortcomings as far as building democracy and good governance in Ethiopia. (Source: Aigaforum.com)

Spike in Eritreans fleeing into Ethiopia
More than 200 risk their lives every day, UN says, crossing a heavily-fortified border between arch enemy states.
AFP
Over 200 Eritrean refugees are crossing the heavily fortified and dangerous border into neighbouring Ethiopia daily, the United Nations said in a report noting a "spike" in those fleeing.
Tens of thousands of people have fled the Horn of Africa country, escaping open-ended conscription and the iron-grip rule of President Issaias Afewerki, with many continuing northwards to brave the often harrowing journey towards Europe.


Is Ethiopia’s Sovereign Debt Sustainable? 
By Seid Hassan, Minga Negash, Tesfaye T. Lemma and Abu Girma Moges 

Although sovereign debts have usually been at the root of many of the financial crises in recent history, scholars allude to the complexity of assessing the sustainability of a nation’s public debt and hence the lack of consensus on the most apt approach. The financial economics literature identifies various models and proxies that could be used for the purpose of gauging the sustainability of a country’s debt. The commonly used benchmarks to measure the sustainability of a country’s debt include, inter alia, a country’s: (i) debt to GDP ratio; (ii) debt to export ratio; (iii) debt to revenue ratio; (iv) trade balance; (v) the primary fiscal gap; (vi) debt service to budgetary revenue; (vii) interest to GDP ratio; and (viii) interest to domestic budgetary revenue. We make a number of important observations with respect to the sustainability of Ethiopia’s public debt by invoking relevant benchmarks and other contextual variables.


Regreening program to restore one-sixth of Ethiopia's land 
Tree and shrub-planting program has transformed degraded and deforested land across Africa, with Ethiopia planning to restore a further 15m hectares by 2030

Regreening EthiopiaFifteen years years ago the villages around Abraha Weatsbha in northern Ethiopia were on the point of being abandoned. The hillsides were barren, the communities, plagued by floods and droughts, needed constant food aid, and the soil was being washed away. Today, Abraha Weatsbha in the Tigray region is unrecognizable and an environmental catastrophe has been averted following the planting of many millions of tree and bush seedlings. Wells that were dry have been recharged, the soil is in better shape, fruit trees grow in the valleys and the hillsides are green again.


 

  


Eritrea: Conversation with the resistance mov’t inside Asmara
Sunday, October 26, 2014 
Horn Affairs

“There is something happening in Asmara that I had never seen before.The streets are quiet but the tension is important, especially as shortages of water, electricity and fuel have become unbearable. As for the trucks and soldiers which were seen outside Asmara, it is possible that they were positioned to conduct raids in the city. But it is also possible that they were parked in a safe place because of the gasoline shortage.” One thing is clear: The government is in a state of extreme tension, especially since this summer conscripts go into hiding, or stay on leave and no longer report to the barracks. For him, this silent rebellion is motivated by the fact that many people – who are married with children and working in the informal sectors to earn a little money – refuse to lose their meager livelihoods and leave their families destitute by going back to the army.


Why It Is a MUST for Sudan to Join Entebbe Agreement
Dr. Salman Mohamed Ahmed Salman – Sudanow
 
The Sudanese Minister of Water Resources and Electricity, Mutaz Mussa, said in a statement carried by local and regional media on 9 October 2014 that the Sudan would not sign Entebbe Agreement in its present form unless an agreement is reached on the pending issues. The Minister said the Sudan’s constant position is continued cooperation around the Nile Basin issues, stressing the importance of this cooperation irrespective of the framework agreement which the Sudan considers a means for cooperation, rather than an end.

In the wake of the Sudan’s support to construction of the Renaissance Dam, the benefits that can be collected from a sincere cooperation have become apparent. The same benefits can be gained from Entebbe Agreement, which is founded on cooperation, opening up new and wider horizons for cooperation with the other Nile Basin states. If it joins the Agreement, the Sudan, which encompasses the largest part of the Nile Basin, will be regarded as a serious state for cooperation on common basins. The country will also occupy an influential position in the Nile Basin Commission which will be the spearhead for cooperation, exchange of information and conflict resolution. Joining the Entebbe Agreement will show that the Sudan possesses a political will-power for taking decisions that serve its own interests, just as it has done with regard to the Renaissance Dam.


The Foreign-Born Population from Africa: 2008-2012
American Community Survey Briefs, ACSBR/12-16
By Christine P. Gambino, Edward N. Trevelyan, and John Thomas Fitzwater
October 2014

Of the 1.6 million foreign born from Africa in the United States, 36 percent were from Western Africa, 29 percent were from Eastern Africa, and 17 percent were from Northern Africa, followed by Southern Africa (5 percent), Middle Africa (5 per- cent), and other Africa (7 percent) (Figure 2, Table 1). Since 2000, the foreign born from Africa increased by over 700,000 persons, up from a total of 881,300. Over 490,000, or about 70 percent of that growth, has been from countries in Western and Eastern Africa. The largest African-born populations were from Nigeria and Ghana in Western Africa; Ethiopia, Kenya, and Somalia in Eastern Africa; Egypt in Northern Africa; and South Africa in Southern Africa. Of these seven, the four largest were Nigeria (221,000 or 14 percent of the African-born population), Ethiopia (164,000 or 10 percent), Egypt (143,000 or 9 percent), and Ghana (121,000 or 8 percent), together constituting 41 percent of the African-born total.


Ethiopia’s ‘African tiger’ leaps towards middle income
The Guardian 

Progress has been remarkable since 1984’s ‘biblical famine’, but inequality, ethnic tension and civil rights issues need to be addressed. It is now three decades since Ethiopia experienced the infamous famine that cost the lives of more than a million people. The tragedy prompted the BBC’s Michael Buerk to describe it as “a biblical famine in the 20th century” and “the closest thing to hell on Earth”. In sharp contrast with that devastating poverty, Ethiopia is now widely considered to be one of a pack of “African tigers”, with ambitious plans to become a middle-income country by 2025. The nation has, “like the proverbial phoenix, managed to rise from the ashes to become Africa’s fastest-growing non-energy-driven economy”, a senior tax adviser at KPMG Kenya recently noted.


Gail Reed: Where to train the world's doctors? Cuba.
Big problems need big solutions, sparked by big ideas, imagination and audacity. In this talk, journalist Gail Reed profiles one big solution worth noting: Havana’s  Latin American Medical School, which trains global physicians to serve the local communities that need them most. 


Current Issues in Educational Development in Selected African Countries:

A Comparative and International Education Perspective

Ghelawdewos Araia

October 13, 2014

This article intends to critically examine the state of educational developments in Botswana and South Africa from Southern Africa; Ethiopia and Tanzania from East Africa; Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal, and Sierra Leone from West Africa; and Egypt and Morocco from North Africa. The methodology employed throughout the text of this article is the comparative and international education perspective, but the latter, as some people assume, is not simply about comparisons and contrasts. It goes deeper rather in exploring the educational theory and practice in international context, delves into the purposes of schooling, educational access and opportunities, accountability, as well as professionalism and quality education. The methodology also involves demographic attributes, geographical and economic realities, as well as political and cultural factors.  


ETHIOPIAN-BORN BOWFLEX INVENTOR AND ENTREPRENEUR IS DEAD
October 17, 2014 

Dosho Tessema ShifferawHe came to America at age 17 with just $500 in his pocket and supported himself working as a cab driver. While working on a student project at San Francisco City College, Dosho came up with the idea for the Bowflex exercise machine. He patented the concept and attempted to license the idea to fitness equipment manufacturers. Lacking vision, they all declined. He then wrote a business plan with help from the MBDA, and started marketing the product directly to consumers in the early 1980s. He led his company to a successful IPO, forming a public company called Direct Focus, Inc. (DFXI) with a market cap of over $1 billion. Millions of Bowflex units have been sold in the United State and abroad, and the brand is now owned and marketed by The Nautilus Group (NYSE:NLS). Dosho has 14 patents and 4 pending patents worldwide.


CIRCC Candidate Forum draws political heavyweights to Rainier Valley
The three-year-old Coalition of Immigrants, Refugees and Communities of Color is helping South Seattle's diverse communities speak with one voice. And politicians are listening up.
By David Kroman  October 13, 2014.

U.S. Rep. Jim McDermott and other prominent political candidates answered questions at the third annual CIRCC Candidates Forum in Rainier Valley.

The Coalition of Immigrants, Refugees and Communities of Color (CIRCC) is still in its “infant stage,” according to Bereket Kiros, an Ethiopian immigrant and south Seattle resident. But last weekend’s third annual Candidates Forum, hosted by the Coalition in Rainier Avenue’s Eritrean Community Center, was proof that that the community is important in the upcoming November election. Dspite Kiros' disappointment, the potential for CIRCC is enormous. In three years, this small, under funded organization had convinced local, state and national policymakers to sit down with them and respond to their issues. Every panel ended with the same question: “Do you, if elected, promise to meet with the Coalition of Immigrants, Refugees and Communities of Color within 60 days? Please answer yes or no.” Every candidate said yes. Whether candidates make good on those promises remains to be seen. But to extract that sort of public commitment from such a large number of prominent candidates is no small thing for an “infant” organization like CIRCC, which is helping the diverse communities of South Seattle speak with one, coherent voice.


Dam Rising in Ethiopia Stirs Hope and Tension
Source: The New York Times By JACEY FORTIN

GUBA, Ethiopia — There is a remote stretch of land in Ethiopia’s forested northwest where the dust never settles. All week, day and night, thousands of workers pulverize rocks and lay concrete along a major tributary of the Nile River. It is the site of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, the continent’s biggest hydropower plant and one of the most ambitious infrastructure projects ever in Africa. Ethiopia is a poor country, often known best for its past famines, but officials say the dam will be paid for without foreign assistance — a point of national pride. Computer-generated images of the finished structure are framed in government offices, splashed across city billboards and broadcast in repeated specials on the state-owned television channel


Perhaps the greatest threat to Ethiopia comes from within
Some of Addis Ababa’s national-development initiatives are bringing the government into conflict with its own people 
Ahmed Soliman
Since 2000 Ethiopia has registered some of the greatest gains in human development seen anywhere on the planet. It is one of Africa’s fastest-growing economies, with near double-digit GDP growth over the past decade and large-scale infrastructure development. Ethiopia’s geostrategic significance is built on a base of relative stability in a volatile region, enabling it to foster international partnerships on development and regional security. But its largely rural population remains poor, and images of drought, famine, poverty and war from the 1970s and 1980s have endured in the popular imagination around the world.


Egypt: Situation Not to Escalate to War If Dam Talks Collapse - Ethiopian President
Cairo — Ethiopia's Grand Renaissance Dam (GERD) has accomplished 40 per cent of the building process, Ethiopian President Mulatu Teshome said Friday, adding that the first phase will be complete next June producing 700 megawatts. The tripartite committee and international consultancy office are not arbitrators, Teshome added in an interview with Sky News Arabia, referring to the expert committee formed by the three Nile Basin countries to provide an advisory opinion over the building process and the harms it might cause. The committee, which is set to resort to international advisory companies, will produce a detailed study on the dam's effect on the flow of the Nile's water as well as the project's environmental, economic and social effects on Egypt and Sudan. It should conclude its report within six months, by March, and its results are to be binding for all.


Emptying Eritrea: Travelling to Europe against all odds 
By FARAI SEVENZO | Monday, September 29 2014

The Mediterranean is fast becoming a massive watery grave for Africans.
Another 500 reportedly drowned off the coast of Italy the other week, while the attention span of the world quickly moves away. But who are these Africans willing to risk all to reach European shores where they are not wanted? Those of us following the story of African migration will have noticed a marked increase in the number of Eritreans being interviewed in refugee camps on the edge of Europe. President Isaias Afewerki is accused by human rights groups of turning the tiny East African country into "one giant prison" and brooks no opposition. The Eritrean parliament has not met since 2002. As for elections, they have not happened since Eritrea broke away from Ethiopia voting for independence in 1993.



The Reporter (Addis Ababa)
27 September 2014
Ethiopia: Where Did Egypt's "We Are Happy" Stance Come From All of a Sudden?

I wanted to write this piece a long time ago, but events in Gaza caught all my attention and I decided to delay it. As we all followed the events of the last couples of weeks,the politics of the Nile River has gotten another momentum. Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan started the tripartite talks all over again after months of being at a standstill. It was all over the media that negotiations of technical expertise among water ministers from Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia had reached a dead end after all parties refused the proposals set by Egypt to reorganize an international committee to restudy the impact of the ongoing construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam. Those who followed the issue clearly understand that Egypt was following the deep-rooted unjust stand of "historical right" in its foreign policy. This policy had clearly affected the negotiation process and delayed the agreement to be reached between Nile basin countries. We had been hearing presidential and political leaders speeches including "Our blood substitutes any decrease of the flow of the river waters, even a single drop" for several times on several occasions.


The Reporter (Addis Ababa)
20 September 2014
Ethiopia: Water to Djibouti and Discourse With Egypt
By Abebe Aynete

What is new in resuming tripartite talks on an Ethiopian multi-billion dollar hydroelectric dam on the Nile after eight months of disruption? Indeed the three countries, Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan have conducted talks from August 25-26 in Khartoum.
The negotiation however, was suspended in January 2014 amid mounting tension between Cairo and Addis Ababa. The new development in the negotiation has picked up where it left off at the time of its interruption, which is the formation of a committee for implementing the agreed proposal involves a hydrology simulation model and a trans-boundary social, economic and environmental impact assessment. The negotiations resumed after Prime Minister Haile Mariam Dessalegn and Egyptian President Al-Sissi's meeting during the 23rd African Union (AU) summit in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea.


The Reporter (Addis Ababa)
27 September 2014
Ethiopia Not Ripe for Microsoft Branch Office

By Henok Reta
While meeting the Ethiopian Information Technology (IT) professionals in Addis Ababa on Tuesday, Edwin Kinoti, Microsoft's Regional Channel Partner Sales Executive-East Africa, told The Reporter that although the global IT giant considers Ethiopia as one of the major markets in the continent, there is no immediate plan to open a regional office here.
Kenya is a hub for Microsoft operations in Eastern Africa region. However, the regional division head is not convinced that the growing market in Ethiopia is up to the level where the company needs to set up shop to oversee operations here. Kinoti believes that Microsoft East Africa office in Kenya is fully capable of serving the entire Ethiopian and Eastern African Region for the time being.


The ISIS Factor: What Islamic Jihad Means for Ethiopia and the Rest of Africa
IDEA Viewpoint

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD September 20, 2014

ISIS is the latest mystique obscurity of the Islamic Jihad variety, but Jihad is not novice to Ethiopia and/or the rest of Africa. The acronym ISIS actually should read ISIL meaning Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (the geographic area that includes Iraq, Jordan, Israel, Syria, and parts of Turkey). The geopolitics of ISIS, though conceptual rather than actual, includes the entire Middle East, all Horn of Africa countries, all North African countries, some African countries, Spain, and countries like Indonesia in South East Asia. 
The new ISIL Jihad extremists who gained momentum in destabilized Syria and Iraq have preferred to use the name ISIS, perhaps inadvertently or by design, in order to have a catchy name that corresponds to the ancient Egyptian goddess, Isis (Aset).


America On Trial: White Supremacy And The Discriminatory Justice System 

Colin Benjamin September 06,2014
The release of two African-American men from prison in North Carolina after 30 years of incarceration for a murder they didn’t commit is yet another example of the American justice system’s racist targeting of African-Americans as the supposed primary criminal class in the country. Between this outrageous case, the recent police broad daylight execution of Mike Brown, and the chokehold killing of Eric Garner, we must ask: isn’t it time we launch a movement to defeat the racist law enforcement and criminal justice system’s systematic war on Black-America? -
 


Ethiopia, Kenya & Ghana bid to host 2017 Africa Cup of Nations
Africa Cup of Nations trophyBBC News

Ethiopia, Kenya and Ghana have announced their interest in bidding to host the 2017 Africa Cup of Nations following Libya's withdrawal as the host nation. Libya pulled out last week because of ongoing fighting in the country that has delayed plans to build new stadiums for the 16-team tournament. Ethiopia, who hosted the tournament in 1962, 1968 and 1976, say they will submit their proposal immediately." Our government is ready and interested to do everything it can to bring the tournament back to Ethiopia."  Kenya said in a statement that they are also considering a joint bid with Tanzania or Uganda or Rwanda. 


Egypt, Sudan Agree to Six-Month Study of Ethiopia Hydropower Dam
By William Davison

Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan agreed to complete studies within six months on the impact of an Ethiopian hydropower dam on the main tributary of the Nile river after Egypt raised concern about water shortages. A committee of four experts from each nation will investigate the hydrological, social and environmental effects of the $4.2 billion Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, Ethiopia’s Foreign Ministry said on its website today. International consultants will implement the findings, it said. Foreign experts will help settle any disputes. The dam is scheduled to be finished in 2017.


Ethiopia considers devaluing currency
Tuesday 26 August 2014

ETHIOPIA - Ethiopia says it’s considering the World Bank’s suggestion to devalue its currency, the Birr, but government says it wants to minimize the impact on the wider economy.
In July, the World Bank released its third economic report on Ethiopia and advised the country to devalue its currency. The global lender argues that Ethiopia’s Birr is overvalued and that the country would benefit from making the move, but it wouldn't be the first time for Ethiopia.  In 2010, the government devalued the Birr by ten percent - and by 20 percent the year after; all in line with the country’s Growth and Transformation Plan.


Ethiopia Draws Asia Manufacturing Interest
VOA News

For a long time, economists have discussed East Africa's chances to "get a foot in the door" of global manufacturing. China, as the world's leading hub for mass production, has become expensive due to rising labor and energy costs. Meanwhile, East Africa offers a large young and cheap labor force. Until recently though, delays at ports, bad roads, power outages and political instability have prevented a shift from happening. But now, the Ethiopian government is building new industrial mega-zones that have successfully attracted some foreign investors who are moving manufacturing from China.


US-Africa Summit Underway in Washington
VOA News

August 05, 2014 12:33 AM 

The administration of U.S. President Barack Obama is working to strengthen ties with Africa at a three-day summit in Washington for some 50 African heads of state.
Monday's opening forums touched on a range of issues including security, health, the environment and corruption. At one panel focused on trade, South African President Jacob Zuma urged the United States to renew the trade agreement, African Growth and Opportunity Act, when it expires next year. Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud focused on security issues, saying extremists threaten to hamper progress in eastern Africa, while Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn touched on climate chang
e.


The Art of the Kaizen Approach for Sugar Production in Ethiopia: 
Lessons from the Methara Sugar Factory 

Asayehgn Desta, Ph.D. Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Barowsky School of Business, Dominican University of California

Business Process Reengineering (BPR) deals with fundamental organizational change, or is the great-leap approach to redesigning and retooling. It seeks to bring a radical approach to creating a breakthrough in organizations trapped in outmoded and outdated business processes. Top managers and consultants design new ways of doing things and force companies to go beyond continuous improvement of existing products, services, and processes. Though innovative, BPR is being challenged by some companies looking for a strategic remedy that will contribute to the sustainable improvement of their performance and quality, add value for their customers while minimizing cost and eliminating waste. 



The highly anticipated, well organized, and colorful fund raising event was held at the Emerald City, Seattle, WA to benefit the Kilte-Awlaelo (ክልተ፡ ኣውላዕሎ) Schools Development Association. The association continues to electrify us with their level of careful organization, not only to achieve their vision but also cater, accommodate, and entertain their guests. They persistently strive to raise the bar toward standardizing perfection. Their primary goal is to complement the government efforts by providing opportunities and increase their learning experiences of the young minds around Kilte Awlaelo areas. The association is determined to seal the gaps and address barriers by building schools and other necessary resources. 
Good work Team,
Abel


SPF and Sudacal Group Organize Reception Party for the Sudanese Media Delegation to the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam

The Ethiopian Ambassador to Sudan Abadi Zemo appreciates the Role of Sudanese Media on Ethio-Sudanese Ties Adam Sudacal: We are Committed to lead More Initiatives on Ethio-Sudanese Relations. The Sudanese Organization for Press Freedom and Sudacal International Companies Group organized in Khartoum last week a reception and acknowledgment party for the Sudanese media delegation to the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam - GERD. The delegation comprises of nearly 30 Sudanese journalists started their mission from 2-14 July counting almost two weeks in a land trip from Khartoum to the site of the GERD South West of Ethiopia.


Good Day:
The Sudanese Media Delegation to the Grand Ethiopia Renaissance Dam

07/15/2014

We have a lot of good examples for media activities between Sudan and Ethiopia addressing Ethio-Sudanese relations but most of these activities are cultural and social with a little involvement in economic and development issues. People from Ethiopia and Sudan usually prefer to attend cultural festivals that represent Ethiopian and Sudanese cultures and they enjoy them pretty much than political activities. To some extent people feel that development issues are official and government-to-government rather than social and people-to-people issues but such an activity like the latest media delegation has totally changed this notion or conceptualization, however, the Sudanese media delegation from both government and private sectors mixed politics with development with all other issues and published articles and reports which are very enjoyable for all people to read.


Report: Africa loses $58bn yearly to the rest of the world By PAUL REDFERN in London | 
Wednesday, July 16 2014 
Africa is losing a staggering $58 billion every year to the rest of the world.
For the first time, a group of UK and East African NGOs have put the figure on the amount sub-Saharan Africa loses through debt repayments, illicit financial flows and illegal activities.
The group is led by Health Poverty Action, but also includes the People’s Health Movement Kenya, the African Forum and Network on Debt and Development, the World Development Movement, War on Want and eight other NGOs. While $134 billion flows into the continent each year, predominantly in loans, foreign investment and aid, $192 billion is taken out, mainly in profits made by foreign companies, tax evasion and the costs of adapting to climate change.


Economic cooperation between Egypt and Ethiopia on the rise
Source: Al Monitor

Cairo is working on resuming the Ethiopian-Egyptian activities that were suspended on all levels. This comes in tandem with the preparations for the expected visit of Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to Ethiopia, and as part of the restoration of dialogue aiming to settle the dispute between the countries over the Renaissance Dam under construction on the Blue Nile. The dialogue was re-opened following the meeting that was held between the Ethiopian prime minister and Sisi on the sidelines of the last African Summit held in Equatorial Guinea


Ethiopia PM Hailemariam defends Andargachew Tsege arrest - BBC
11 July 2014 

Ethiopia had a moral obligation to arrest the opposition leader who was controversially extradited from Yemen last month, Ethiopian leader Hailemariam Desalegn has told the BBC. "Andargachew Tsege is a Trojan horse for the Eritrean government to destabilise this country," he said. In a rare interview Prime Minister Hailemariam has also told the BBC that he will not be swayed by foreign pressure on Ethiopian matters. He spoke to Emmanuel Igunza, who asked him how he would ensure that next year's elections will be fair and all inclusive. 


Consuming what we don't produce, producing what we don't consume
By DANIEL K. KALINAKI | Tuesday, July 8 2014

African Review Illicit outflows
The bigger problem with finance, however, is not with how much comes into Africa but how much leaves. A joint report by the African Development Bank (AfDB) and Global Financial Integrity, a US-based research group, found that cumulative illicit outflows from Africa between 1980 and 2009 ranged between $1.2 trillion and $1.4 trillion.


New Wave of African Writers With an Internationalist Bent - NYT
NY Times

More than a decade ago, when the young Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was struggling to get her first novel, “Purple Hibiscus,” published, an agent told her that things would be easier “if only you were Indian,” because Indian writers were in vogue. Another suggested changing the setting from Nigeria to America. Ms. Adichie didn’t take this as commentary on her work, she said, but on the timidity of the publishing world when it came to unknown writers and unfamiliar cultures, especially African ones.
   These days she wouldn’t receive that kind of advice. Black literary writers with African roots (though some grew up elsewhere), mostly young cosmopolitans who write in English, are making a splash in the book world, especially in the United States. They are on best-seller lists, garner high profile reviews and win major awards, in America and in Britain. Ms. Adichie, 36, the author of “Americanah,” which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction this year, is a prominent member of an expanding group that includes Dinaw Mengestu, Helen Oyeyemi, NoViolet Bulawayo, Teju Cole, Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor and Taiye Selasi, 


Egypt and Ethiopia agree that tripartite dam committee will resume its work
Al Ahram Online

The Egyptian foreign minister along with his Ethiopian counterpart stressed that Ethiopia will understand the importance of the Nile River to Egypt and that Egypt will understand the Ethiopian need for development Egypt and Ethiopia will form a joint committee in the upcoming three months to enhance bilateral relations between the two countries, the foreign ministers of both countries announced in a joint statement on Friday.The statement came after Egypt`s new president, Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi, met with the Ethiopian Prime Minister, Hailemariam Desalegn, after the African Union summit in Equatorial Guinea's capital Malabo.


An Appeal letter to Diaspora Ethiopian Tigreans!
Dear Ethiopian Tegaru Diaspora Members who are coming for Tigray Festival to Meqelle! We residents of Tigray would like to bring our concern to your attention. This is an appeal posted by Save Adina on FB and we find it relevant to send it to websites to be published. When we heard our sisters/brothers are coming home, we are highly motivated to herald Save Adna’s message to them believing that they are not coming home for vacation only. Hence, we hope this call will get to every Ethiopian Tigaru’s address!


International Tigray Festival 2014
A Call for Action

International Tigray Festival 2014 Resource Mobilization Teaming up with Natna Lowti-Our Change Foundation at - http://www.ourchangefoundation.com
Tigray Festival - 2014 which is scheduled to take place from July 31, to August 6, 2014 in Mekelle, Ethiopia is fast approaching. The event is the first of its kind, and will be a landmark in history. Tigray Festival 2014 has an ambitious plan that we hope will play a big role in reversing the current brain drain in our mother land. That project is The Heritage-Youth CenterThere is no doubt in our mind the home grown endowments like EFFORT, and local NGOs, like TDA, and REST, will join us in the noble project. While the Heritage-Youth Center is a long term project of the festival, we also have a current plan.


The Good, the Bad, the Ugly
Thursday, June 12, 2014 2:30 pm
Kim Wenzel

Isaias Afewerki, led the Eritrean People’s Liberation Front, a movement that won independence from Ethiopia in 1991, after 30 years of armed conflict. The Eritrean people celebrated with delight! The old saying, it seemed to-good-to-be-true, applied. The new president and hero, Isaias Afewerki, quickly turned into a dictator.
May 24 of this year marked the 21st birthday of the young nation. The average citizen in the country of six million did little celebrating. Tens of thousands of young people have fled the country over the years, and those remaining live in fear. Today, the Eritrean regime tolerates no dissent of any kind: there is no free media, no university, and even the ruling party — renamed the People’s Front for Freedom and Democracy — has not held a party conference for years.


Ethiopia: Egypt Signaled and signed a diplomatic deal - 
Cairo (HAN) June 13, 2014 – Egyptian President Al Sissi pushes for deal on disputed Nile Dam and Signaled a diplomatic deal with Ethiopia.

egypt_sisiEthiopiaPresident Abdul Fattah Al Sissi signaled a thaw in ties with Addis Ababa, when he said in an inaugural speech that he would not allow a dispute over Ethiopia’s construction of a hydraulic dam on the Nile to “cause a crisis” between both countries or affect inter-African cooperation. “In his 

inaugural speech, Al Sissi sought to remove the impact of Mursi’s notorious meeting,” Hani Raslan, an expert at the state-run Al Ahram Centre for Strategic Studies said. “By signaling readiness to cooperate with Ethiopia, Al Sissi also sought to deprive Ethiopia of its argument that Egypt stands against development in Africa.


Three significant events were held in Seattle on the same day- (ሆይ፡ይባሃል፡አሎ)
The Tigrai Community Association of Seattle celebrated three important events under one roof on the same day. The community celebrated the 23rd anniversary of Ginbot 20 victory which marked the swift victory of the former repressive regime; rejoiced the graduation of 30 TCA youth members; and held a fund raising auction to benefit our late PM Meles Zenawi’s foundation.
The official memorial ceremony began at 8pm on 6/14/14 with 30 seconds of prayers to honor those men and women who have laid down their life for our freedom. The organizing committee kicked off the fund raining activities to benefit the Meles foundation where several generous donors including former fighters made this event a success. Ms. Mebrat Beyene of the consulate general of Ethiopia in Los Angeles attended the event.


Eritrea: Int'l Community Urged to Probe Iran's Toxic Waste Dumped in Eritrea
By Tesfa-Alem Tekle, 10 June 2014 Source Allafrica
Addis Ababa — An Eritrean opposition political organization, the Red Sea Afar Democratic Organization (RSADO) on Tuesday renewed its appeal up on the international community to investigate hazardous waste allegedly dumped inside the red sea nation. In an interview with Sudan Tribune, RSADO's leader, Ibrahim Haron, said the international community has gave "deaf ears" in responding to the group's first official appeal in 2010, when a brown coloured toxic waste materials were first detected. While strongly denouncing what he said was the Eritrea government's "irresponsible and criminal acts" the opposition official alleged that the nuclear and industrial toxic wastes were exported from Iran to Eritrea in exchange of money.


Uganda, S. Sudan oppose Nile deal review 
anzanian Foreign Minister Bernard Kamillius Membe has called for a review of the agreement to consider Egypt's water needs.

Uganda, S. Sudan oppose Nile deal reviewWorld Bulletin / News Desk Uganda and South Sudan have both expressed their opposition to a Tanzanian proposal to review a 2010 Comprehensive Framework Agreement (CFA) signed by upstream Nile Basin countries, known as the Entebbe agreement, in order to consider Egypt's water needs.South Sudan's Foreign Ministry said the Entebbe agreement had to be maintained, since it took into consideration the right of all riparian states to Nile water.
"The agreement speaks of freedom to use the Nile water. Any country along the Nile has the freedom to use the water for their good," ministry spokesperson Mawien Makol Arik told AA.

Sudan reaffirms support for Ethiopia dam project 
In a major U-turn last year, Sudan backed an Ethiopian decision to change the course of the Blue Nile. 


Cairo and Khartoum caught in the winds of the Ethiopian dam
Yasser Al-Hussain
Thursday, 05 June 2014 
Egyptian-Sudanese relations have yet to address any of the major points that are being discussed between the two countries today and this is primarily due to the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam. Sudan is greatly concerned that Egyptian officials believe that it is within the best interests of their country's national security to prevent any dams from being built outside of their national borders. Meanwhile for Sudan, any agricultural development is directly tied to building more dams, particularly outside the Sudanese borders. 


Ethiopia Shoots for the Stars and Galaxies as it Aims to Become Space Science Hub
By James Jeffrey

“Ethiopian politicians have recognized the role space science can play in helping Ethiopia’s development, and are supporting generating investment in the country’s new observatories and space programme.” -- Abinet Ezra, the Ethiopian Space Science Society.


Cairo and Khartoum caught in the winds of the Ethiopian dam .
Yasser Al-Hussain
 
Egyptian-Sudanese relations have yet to address any of the major points that are being discussed between the two countries today and this is primarily due to the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam. Sudan is greatly concerned that Egyptian officials believe that it is within the best interests of their country's national security to prevent any dams from being built outside of their national borders. Meanwhile for Sudan, any agricultural development is directly tied to building more dams, particularly outside the Sudanese borders.  Water storage facilities in Sudan are not capable of housing the amounts of water resources that are needed to irrigate the vast amounts of agricultural planes in the country. Even when it comes to the question of Halayeb, an area of disputed land between the Egyptian and Sudanese border which is currently under Egyptian control much to the fear of the Sudanese, it is likely that Egypt will use this territory as a playing card with which it will place pressure on Sudan to give up some of its most basic water rights.


Book Review: The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam - Official version
Former Egyptian irrigation and water resources minister examines the history of Ethiopia's plans to construct a dam on the Nile River
Mahmoud El-Wardani, Thursday 15 May 2014

Azmat Sadd Al-Nahda Al-Ethiopi (The Ethiopian Renaissance Dam Crisis) by Mohamed Nasr El-Din Allam, Dar Al-Mahroussa Publishing, Cairo, 2014. pp.242
The story of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, which Ethiopia has already started to construct, has a long history that dates back to the 1950s. Ethiopia has attempted many times to control the sources of the Nile -- Egypt's lifeline. The book's author is a former Egyptian minister of irrigation and water resources, who took office in 2009 in a decisive period in which Ethiopia attempted to build an alliance of upstream states against downstream states. The objective of this alliance was to breach the historic Nile treaties. Certainly the author is not just an official running one of the oldest ministries in Egypt and the most bureaucratic, but he also has intimate knowledge of the minutest details of the issue. This issue is directly linked to Egyptian national security. It goes without saying that all documents, treaties, maps, data and agreements were at his disposal.


Egypt: Why Is Egypt's Hydro-Political Concern More Intense On Sudan?
By Nurye Yassin, 31 May 2014
Allafrica

opinion
The world has recently witnessed the long march of Egypt's indignation to Ethiopia's move on the construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) over the Blue Nile (Abay) River.
Many Egyptian politicians and hydro-political strategists with their media acolytes promptly have portrayed the GERD as the bell ringing the complete final apocalypse of Egypt. To discard the apocalyptic imagery of the GERD and clear the clouds of such a vision of the said strategists, Ethiopia has tried to unravel the real benefits of the Dam to Egyptian and Sudanese citizens with great caution and the sine qua non of genuine cooperation and dialogue to finalize the recommendations of the International Panel of Experts (IPoE) report.


Ethiopian power project wins backing from geothermal fund
The contract, worth up to $8 million, was signed by the African Union (AU) and the Icelandic-US private developer Reykjavik Geothermal Limited (RG) for drilling the wells at the Corbetti geothermal power project. The grant was awarded under the AU-led ‘geothermal risk mitigation facility’, which is designed to encourage public private investment and financial support for geothermal exploration in East Africa. The grant was approved at an international donor meeting in Iceland last week hosted by the AU Commission and the International Development Bank.


Ethiopia at a Glance

United Nations Development Programme
Annual Report 2013

Ethiopia is among the fastest growing economies in the world and has maintained an average GDP
growth rate of 11percent in the last ten years. In 2012/13 fiscal year the economy grew by 9.7 percent, which  is higher than the sub-Saharan Africa‘s average GDP growth rate of 4 percent. 
Gross Domestic Product. Ethiopia’s GDP is $ 47 Billion by end of 2012/13, the economy has been growing by 10.9% on average in the past decade, and growth is estimated to be 11.2 percent for 2013/14. Agriculture accounted for 43% of GDP in 2013 in contrast to 51% share in 2007. The sector generates over 70% export values and employs 85% of the population. The share of the service sector has been increasing in the past decade and reached 45% in 2013 from 39.8% in 2007 Industry’s share remains low at around 12%.


Elias S. Siraj, M.D., F.A.C.E., F.A.C.P.
AACE Outstanding Service Award for the Promotion of Endocrine Health of an Underserved Population

Elias S. Siraj, M.D., F.A.C.E., F.A.C.P., is a Professor of Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He is also Director of Endocrinology Fellowship Training Program and Director of Diabetes Program. He has also served Temple as the Director of Clinical Endocrinology.  Dr. Siraj attended medical school in Ethiopia at Gondar College of Medical Sciences, Addis Ababa University. He was then awarded a scholarship to do residency and research training at the University of Leipzig, Germany. Subsequently, he completed his residency and fellowship training at the Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.


Manufacturing: Ethiopia receives World Bank loan to create jobs

Source African Report
Ethiopia on Tuesday received a $250 million dollar loan from the World Bank to finance the implementation of a competitiveness and job creation project in the country.
The agreement intends to support Ethiopia's efforts of creating new jobs and increase competitiveness in the light of a growing manufacturing sector through the development of industrial zones in Addis Ababa and enhancing linkages with the local economy.


Prisoners of Past History or Producers of a Better Future?
By Tesfaye Habisso, 

“I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past.” [Thomas Jefferson, 1743-1826]
. “The study of history is the best medicine for a sick mind; for in history you have a record of the infinite variety of human experience plainly set out for all to see; and in that record you can find yourself and your country both examples and warnings; fine things to take as models, base things rotten through and through, to avoid.” [Livy]
Since recent times, my wife and I have somehow developed a sort of deep interest or passion for Pastor (Dr.) Gamachis Desta’s* evangelical sermons on the Elshaddai program broadcasted to Christian followers in Ethiopia every week. 


The Ancient Rock-Carved Churches of Lalibela, Ethiopia [360-Degree Panorama]
Last updated on May 15th, 2014 by Audrey Scott 

The story goes: almost 900 years ago in Ethiopia there lived a visionary king named Lalibela.
Lalibela traveled far and wide, including an extended pilgrimage he took to Jerusalem, after which he brought back home to Ethiopia all he’d seen and learned. When Muslims conquered Jerusalem in the late 12th century and it became too dangerous for devout Ethiopian Christians to make the pilgrimage to Jerusalem itself, Lalibela fashioned a work-around: to build a New Jerusalem in his home country.


Why ‘Made in Ethiopia’ Could Be The ‘Next Made in China’ 
Mounting labor costs in China are part of what makes Africa so attractive. The average monthly wage for a low-skilled Ethiopian factory worker, for example, is about 25% of the pay for a comparable Chinese worker, according to the World Bank. As the wage gap widens between unskilled Chinese workers and their counterparts elsewhere in Asia and in Africa, as many as 85 million factory jobs could leave China in the coming years, according to former World Bank chief economist Justin Yifu Lin.


Canadian-mine-in-eritrea-had-been-built-partly-by-defacto-slaves

 

Isaias_Afwerki1Djibouti (HAN) May 14, 2014. Regular Expert Analysis , Your Power & Regional Influence Magazine. The Horn of Africa country of Eritrea is a new gold mining zones with a number of exciting mining developments taking place. Some of these are occuring in remote, semi desert locations, presenting particular challenges to the mining companies and the staff. These challenges can include temperatures that approach 50°C and dust storms. Eritrean authority led by President Isaias Afwerki rejected as “cheap shots and lies” a report by Human Rights Watch that said forced labor was used to construct a gold mine it owns with Canada’s Nevsun Resources Ltd. (NSU)Segen Construction Co. According to the reporters by William Davison in Addis Ababa,By the time construction commenced at Bisha in late 2008, forced labour was an inseparable feature of Eritrea’s economy. Nevsun appreciated this. “We recognized that there was a potential National Service issue with respect to the subcontractor,” CEO Cliff Davis told a parliamentary subcommittee in 2012. 


A reported past attack on Africans in the Ukraine. Source: observers.france24.com
[Op-Ed: The Pan African Agenda]

An Agenda For The 21st Century


In his appeal for assistance addressed to the United African Congress (UAC) and Give Them a Hand Foundation, the president of the African Center in Kiev, King Assante-Yeboa chronicles the daily travails and existential threats the Africans face in these turbulent times in the Ukraine.
He goes on to say: “As visible minorities especially Africans and African-Ukrainians still face racially motivated abuses, some of them are compelled to stay in doors to avoid possibility of being physically attacked”. The heads of households have been deprived of their ability to provide for their families; victims of intimidation and assaults in a deteriorating and increasingly uncertain economic and political environment. Many are in need of urgent material assistance to help pay for food and rent.


Creating Territorial Boundaries to Design the Political Order of Self- rule and Shared-rule of Federal Units: A Review 
Desta, Aayehgn, Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Barowsky School of Business, Dominican University of California
Introduction

Trends in the formation of ethnic-national and regional federalism have recently spurred literature on political economy. Since these legitimate bases, contents, and divisions are the central themes of federalism, a number of researchers have addressed the dilemmas and opportunities faced by a number of federalist states. More specifically, researchers are attempting to articulate important exogenous and endogenous factors and then to examine them critically for their viability for federalism.   The most profound issue that surrounds federalism is that unitary sovereign states are breaking into autonomous ethnic or cultural cleavages. Regions are seeking a combination of self-rule and shared rule without facing constrained control from the central government.  Given the relationship between the doctrine of federalism and the diffusion of central governmental power to impose its norms upon the autonomous regions, the central focus of this study is to examine the modalities of federalism. 


Ethiopia: Having Your Cake and Eating It Too: Egyptian Style
By Awash Lemma

Introduction
The Benefits of the GERD to Ethiopia and also to the downstream countries of Egypt and the Sudan have been discussed exhaustively elsewhere and I do not intend to repeat them here. This piece is triggered by the mindless hysteric propaganda from Cairo - declaration after declaration - threatening, blackmailing, posturing - abuses of all sorts against Ethiopia. The motto seems to be ‘a declaration a day will blow the GERD away!’ The Egyptians even gave Ethiopia the status of god, by demanding Ethiopia should guarantee that the volume of water flowing from the Nile will never change because of the construction of the GERD. 


Yohannes IV of Ethiopia: A Political Biography 
Revised Edition, The Red Sea Press 2014Authored by Zewde Gabre-Sellassie, 
PhD Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD
May 6, 2014


There is no doubt that Yohannes was in favor of Ethiopian Muslims embracing Christianity, and he was also in favor of the Holy City of Askum to be free of Muslims but he did not support the idea of congregating Muslims at Addi Gwatsiya, a ghetto-like area for the followers of Islam. On the contrary, he granted them land in Mekelle, not far from his palace and in many other cities such as Koda and Mai Kumel near Aksum; Edaga Malka in Naeder, and Addi Dahno in Shire; Addi Agam in Awger; Hatsiba in Enda Abba Tsahma; Addi Tegemes in Zengui; Begié Ella in Segli; Addi Zeamere in Enticho; Enda Abba Qendi in Enda Chewa, and Negash in Kilte Awlaélo. (p. 31)


National Bank of Ethiopia Defying Government Proclamation 270/2002
I read an article in Waltainfo.com that heads as “Standard Bank to Open Ethiopian Office”. If this is true, then the foreign bank must have some information that others do not have. Bank ownership in Ethiopia is legally closed to foreign ownership, meaning only Ethiopians are allowed to have ownership and operations in the financial sector. In the context of Ethiopians, the government has found a compromise to include all Ethiopians in Diaspora, including those with foreign pass with the proclamation 270/2002. The only requirement is to have the so called “Yellow ID Card” from the respective Embassy of Ethiopia.


Ethiopia: Rethinking the Voices of Aswan Dam and GERD
By Nurye Yassin,

Endless echoes of Egypt's disrelish, imaginative fear, uncorroborated reports from partisan experts, and mythical prophecies of the perils of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) upon the peoples of Egypt have reverberated and resonated over the geopolitical sphere of the Eastern Nile Basin. The media, academia, polity and hydro-diplomacy deployed are also calling to halt the construction of the Dam. It is very timely and quite essential to unveil and fathom Egypt's enigmatic hydro-political calculation and conclusion behind the Aswan Dam and Ethiopia's aspirations to make GERD an emblem of regional progress and prosperity. Egypt's colonial, paternalistic mentality of if I win, you lose must wither and Ethiopia's win-win must flourish over the hemisphere of the Nile Basin. Egypt's leadership must innovate itself than extending the singular delusory principle of the country to control the Nile. As Ethiopia's Reawakening is being manifested, Egypt's must be borne for the sustainability of humankind on the Nile River.


Jakarta, Manila Pegged as Global Leaders 
By Jake Maxwell Watts

Jakarta and Manila, two of Asia’s most chaotic, congested cities, are likely to get a lot better in the next two decades, according to a new ranking by A.T. Kearney.
The U.S.-based consulting firm placed Indonesia’s capital at the top of a list of 34 cities in low and middle income countries most likely to become a global leader in everything from business activity to workforce health and security. The Philippine capital grabbed second place, followed by Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa. The only other Southeast Asian countries on the list were Kuala Lumpur (10), Bangkok (21), and Ho Chi Minh City (29).


Alliance and Alienation 

Ethiopia and Israel in the Days of Haile Selassie 

Authored by Haggai Erlich, PhD The Red Sea Press, 2014

Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD April 17, 2014

Haggai Erlich is a renowned Israeli historian and an Ethiopianist, and this is not the first time he is writing about Ethiopia. One of his excellent books on Ethiopia put out by the Lynne Rienner Publishers in 1986 is Ethiopia and the Challenge of Independence. What makes Alliance and Alienation different is the fact that the book is heavily focused on diplomacy and intelligence with respect to the Ethiopian-Israeli relations. The book also provides the reader some secretly conducted diplomatic ventures and investments of the Israeli Government as well as the unofficial sojourn of Israeli leaders in Ethiopia.  


The Misdirection of Healthcare Facilities:
Don’t You Need to Wake up Before it's Too Late? 

Professor Desta, Asayehgn 
While the fundamentals of human rights place health services as indispensable for the exercise of other human rights conducive to living a life of dignity, the human capital theory locates health as fundamental to enhancing the efficiency and productivity of the labor force. Given these as fundamental rights of health services, it is disheartening to note that a number of policy makers in a number of developing countries don’t seem to have a sustained political will to allocate their limited heath sector budget to providing accessible health care facilities for their citizens. 


Ethiopia slammed the extremist anti-dam group International Rivers


International Rivers Network (IRN), an extremist anti-dam group based in the People's Republic of Berkeley has been slammed by the Ethiopian government for its one sided report against the construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD), on Ethiopia's mighty Abay river. 
The National Panel of Experts of GERD accused IRN "of subverting Ethiopia’s efforts to develop its water resources and lift its vast and growing population out of poverty." It accused the IRN of being paid by Egypt in order to lobby against the Renaissance Dam internationally. 
"Again, the IRN never loses opportunity to lobby for its Egyptian paymasters. Not only does the IRN talk about the 'oversize' of GERD, but also about the Egyptians’ negative emotions over GERD: anger and fear."


Being Ethiopian in Seattle 
A book explores the experiences of Ethiopian refugees adapting to Seattle and suggests their presence is changing the community

By Jerry Large
Seattle Times staff columnist
Retired UW sociologist
Joseph Scott
In 1980, the federal government started placing Ethiopian refugees in Seattle, one of a few cities chosen to receive what would eventually be thousands of people — at least 10,000 now just in the Seattle area. “It is the first significant migration of black Africans to America since slavery times,” Joseph Scott told me when we spoke Monday at his home in Southeast Seattle. 
Scott, an ethnologist and sociologist, wrote “Little Ethiopia of the Pacific Northwest” (Transaction Publishers, 2013) in collaboration with Solomon A. Getahun, a history professor at Central Michigan University, and himself a refugee. 


Ethiopia is ranked as Sub-Saharan Africa's strongest military power 
Ethiopia is ranked as the strongest military power in Sub Saharan Africa, according to a study by Global Fire Power. The study claims to make use of over 40 factors to determine each country's power index. Ethiopia with with a total population of 93 million people has 182,500 active frontline personnel. More than 24 million people are considered fit for military service. In its arsenal, Ethiopia's military has over 560 tanks, more than 780 armored fighting vehicles. It also has one of the strongest air power in the continent with more than 81 fighting aircraft and as well as 8 attack helicopters.


Ethiopia dismisses International Rivers as Egypt’s proxy 
Daniel Berhane

Ethiopia rejected anti-dam group’s call for the cessation of the construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance dam. The American-based International Rivers Network made the demand on March 31 in a statement titled “GERD panel of Experts Report: Big Questions Remain”.
Addis Ababa responded today in a press release by her National Panel of Experts (NPoE) rebuking International Rivers Network’s (IRN) statement as “full of lies and distortions”, adding that:
we condemn IRN’s unfair and biased support for Egypt in its disagreements with Ethiopia contrary to its own mission statement. We categorically reject IRN’s advice to Ethiopia to accept its proposal and halt construction of GERD….. IRN is doing ethically dubious job and propagating proxy campaigns against Ethiopia on behalf of Egypt.


Dr. Desta, Asayehgn, the recipient of Melba Beals Award for Excellence in Diversity
A humble scholar, quiet leader, and a person who never shirks his responsibility to ask the difficult questions, this recipient has a sustained, long-term history for diversity work at Dominican that dates back to 1993. He has published books, financially supports a vocational school in Ethiopia all by himself, serves as a role model for faculty and students, and has been at the forefront of diversity work that has paved the way for many faculty and students of color who have entered DUOC. He has been a persistent advocate for diversity even when his questions and observations have been unpopular – so much so that his struggle to diversify the campus as one of the few faculty of color at DUOC when he started 27 years ago can be identified as a pioneering foundation for all that has followed. Multiple faculty of color and others acknowledge his deep and abiding work for diversity at DUOC, internationally, across continents, and the African Diaspora. He is recognized for his excellence in diversity work for not just his accomplishments, but for his humanity, and for always being a person who stands up for what is right and for giving voice to the diversity of people who need it most. We recognize Dr. Asayeghn Desta for his sustained efforts toward diversity and inclusion at DUOC and in the international community.


The Ground Water Potential of the North African Region and the Nile Issue

Asmamaw Temesgen was a native of Lake Tana Region, source of the Abay River, April 7, 2014.
This article was designed to provide a brief overview on the Geo-scientific information and the economic potential of the enormous natural water reserves in the North African Region. Focus was made to the growing water resource demands of the region, particularly on the “Nile River Saga”. The writer has a Geo-scientific back ground and aims to draw more attention to some of the relevant information about the ground water potential of the region that has not been covered from the Egyptian’s standpoint.



Milena BelloniApril 5, 2014 06:42
It's April, which means Eritrea's refugees are headed north

‘Wey keb wey geb! All or nothing!’

Last year Europe received around 484,600 asylum applications, according to the United Nations Humanitarian Commission on Refugees (UNHCR). Among those, 21,293 were Eritrean refugees, the majority of whom had arrived by boat from Libya to Italy. The tragedy in which 366 Eritrean migrants drowned in a boat off the coast of the Italian island of Lampedusa last October is still raw in the minds of many people who lost friends and relatives. But this will not stop other refugees from making the same journey. For the last decade a continuous flow of people have left Eritrea, unable to bear life in what they describe as a prison state. Eritrea has not held free elections since 1993 when Eritreans voted for independence from Ethiopia after a 30-year-long struggle. After a few years of peace, in 1998 a war broke out between Eritrea and Ethiopia that lasted two years. Ever since then the entire population has been fully militarized.


Egypt’s Historic Right over the River Nile
By G. E. Gorfu

Since the first foundation stone was laid on the Grand Renaissance Dam (GRD) Egypt has shown its eternal belligerence towards Ethiopia, demanding Ethiopia honor the 1929 and 1959 Colonial treaties. At times Egypt walks out from the negotiations; at times it pretends to go along with the agreements but refuses to sign the Nile Basin Treaty; at times Egypt demands more studies to be done, refusing to accept various studies done so far; at times it threatens it would wage war. And it continues to harp on its “Historic Right” over the waters of the River Nile.


BLUE NILE MONOLOGUE 
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD 

April 3, 2014 


I was born millions of years ago 
Perhaps 180 million years geological timeline 
When Gondwanaland broke up 
During the Mesozoic period 
When crustal extension took place 
Beyond the Lake Ţana Near the mountain called Denquez 


The Battle of Adwa, African Victory in the Age of Empire: A Reflection 

Desta, Asayehgn, Ph.D, Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Dominican University of California 

Introduction
The defeat of Italy by Ethiopia on March 1, 1896 at the Battle of Adwa, then the vibrant capital of Tigrai, not only demonstrated the resilience and patriotism of Ethiopians but also made Ethiopia the steward of future hopes for the emancipation of the other nations that were subjugated under foreign rule. For example, Japan, used Ethiopia’s experience as its model and developed a strategy to fight against Russia in 1904. However, for a number of the European colonialists, when they heard that Italy was defeated by the heroic Ethiopian army at the Battle of Adwa in 1896, they were surprised and humiliated that members of the white race had lost. They suddenly had to rethink their ideas and policies about Africa being predominantly inhabited by primitive people that needed colonial rule in order to advance into a modern world.


Healthline: It’s All About Resources
Source: Fortune

FORTUNE: The Private Health Sector Program (PHSP) in which you are involved aims to optimise, regulate and cement partnership with the public sector for sustainable universal access. But how is it possible for the Program to achieve these, as the two sectors have been mired in misgivings and complaints against one another? Tesfaye G. Kidan: I would say that the basis for any progress, be it among people or groups, is creating common ground. Thus, there has to be an atmosphere of understanding.
It begins, in this case, with identifying the complaints by the private sector and the demands of the public health sector. These need to be clearly understood. Then, the trial to devise a solution to bring the two together can come.


THE NILE WATER ISSUE AND…
A PEACEFUL SOLUTION SUGGESTED MANY YEARS AGO…

Open Letter to Prime Minister Meles Zenawi
by G. E. Gorfu

Dear Prime Minister, I only have one question: When did Ethiopia become a protectorate of Egypt? Otherwise, why on earth is Ethiopia requesting the permission of Egypt to use the waters that rightly belong to her? I am sure you know very well the history of our ancestors: Haileselassie, Menelik, Yohannes, Alula, Tewodros, and many others. Not one of them would ever go this low as to beg Egypt's permission for the use of a body of water found in the heart of Ethiopia? Why should Ethiopia uphold any treaty signed between Egypt and England, or any other two nations for that matter, to which Ethiopia was not a party of, or signatory to? Other riparian nations rejected those treaties, and Ethiopia too, should never uphold them.


On behalf of the Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA), Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia will soon begin reviewing several books on Ethiopia and two of the books whose image is shown here, 'Alliance and Alienation' by Haggai 

Erlich and 'Yohannes IV of Ethiopia' (revised edition) by Zewde Gebre-Selassie  will be the first to be reviewed. Readers interested in purchasing the books can directly contact the the publisher at the address below:

The Red Sea Pres, Inc. 541 W. Ingham Ave Suite B

Trenton, Nj 08638   (609) 695-3200

                              awprsp@verizon.net    http://www.africaworldpressbooks.com/


Somalia: The Diplomat’s feeling of political confederation system linking Somalia, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Eritrea 
Ambassador Samantar: I feel that if a system of political confedera­tion linking Somalia, Ethiopia, Djibouti, and Eritrea were someday established on the basis of the right of peoples to self-determination, the Horn of Africa would be transformed into an oasis of peace, stability, and prosperity. If that happened, Somalia would rediscover its lost unity, Ethiopia would have access to both the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean, Eritrea could freely choose its destiny, and Djibouti would find tranquility without being coveted by its big sisters. Peace could finally be established in that part of the African continent, and that is the sine qua non condition for its development, which alone will enable the inhabitants to view the future with optimism and hope. - See more at: http://geeskaafrika.com/?p=2047#sthash.lYILj0Mk.dpuf


UNSC: The Somalia and Eritrea Sanctions Committee Revises its Guidelines - 
New York (HAN) On 26 March 2014,REVISES ITS GUIDELINES SECURITY COUNCIL 751 AND 1907
COMMITTEE ON SOMALIA AND ERITREA - the Security Council Committee pursuant to resolutions 751 (1992) and 1907 (2009) concerning Somalia and Eritrea adopted revised Guidelines for the Conduct of its Work. These latest Guidelines reflect Security Council resolution 2142 (2014). The Committee has adopted the revised Guidelines to facilitate the conduct of its own work and provide useful guidance to Member States in their efforts to implement the relevant Security Council resolutions. The English language version of the revised Guidelines is available on the Committee’s website* and versions of the Guidelines in all six official languages will be made available on the website in due course. - See more at: http://geeskaafrika.com/?p=1970#sthash.HPBzPbOY.dpuf


Ethiopia lashed out at longstanding rival Eritrea
ADDIS ABABA (HAN) March 28, 2014 – The Ethiopian foreign ministry spokesman atto. Mufti has lashed out at longstanding rival Eritrea, accusing the latter of destabilizing the East Africa region, while also blasting Egypt for the latter’s “malicious” media campaign against Ethiopia’s multibillion-dollar hydroelectric dam project. ”Eritrea’s involvement in regional conflicts has been the case for long now,” Ambassador Dina Mufti told foreign journalists at a weekly press briefing on Thursday. According to Mufti, Eritrea has played a role in the ongoing conflict in South Sudan. ”We have circumstantial evidence of Eritrea’s involvement [in the South Sudan crisis],” the spokesman said. - See more at:
http://geeskaafrika.com/?p=2015#sthash.KFj26HoT.dpuf


Japan brings kaizen philosophy to Ethiopia
By Paul Melly BBC News, Ethiopia 

"Sorting, setting in order, shining, standardising, sustaining," proclaims a handwritten poster stuck to the wall of a shed where women gather twice a week to make craft items in the village of Faniekir. Kaizen, the workplace philosophy that helped guide Japan's recovery from the ruins of defeat in World War Two, has reached the rural uplands of southern Ethiopia.
Simple principles of tidiness and self-discipline are among the foundations of an approach that so impressed the late prime minister Meles Zenawi that he adopted it as national strategy.


Meet the three Eritrean women who are taking on the regime
Feruz Werede, Selam Kidane and Meron Estefanos are finding ways of challenging one of the most repressive states in Africa.

Eritrea – bordering on the Red Sea – is a land of extremes. The searing heat of its deserts and the harness of the mountains are softened by abundant valleys and a green, fertile plateau. Much the same can be said of its politics. Fierce and stubborn in their 30-year war of independence from Ethiopia that ended in May 1991, the Eritrean people briefly held the promise of a model state, with an open democracy and real hopes of prosperity.  Yet today Eritrea is among the most repressive states in Africa. Thousands of its youth, desperate to escape interminable conscription, flee the country, running the risk of drowning in the Mediterranean or being sold to people-traffickers in the Sinai.


 


CAIRO - When Egypt’s then-president Mohamed Morsi said in June 2013 that “all options” including military intervention, were on the table if Ethiopia continued to develop dams on the Nile River, many dismissed it as posturing. But experts claim Cairo is deadly serious about defending its historic water allotment, and if Ethiopia proceeds with construction of what is set to become Africa’s largest hydroelectric dam, a military strike is not out of the question. Relations between Egypt and Ethiopia have soured since Ethiopia began construction on the 4.2 billion dollar Grand Renaissance Dam in 2011. Egypt fears the new dam, slated to begin operation in 2017, will reduce the downstream flow of the Nile, which 85 million Egyptians rely on for almost all of their water needs. Officials in the Ministry of Irrigation claim Egypt will lose 20 to 30 percent of its share of Nile water and nearly a third of the electricity generated by its Aswan High Dam.


ETHIOPIA: RED LINES, GREEN BANANA TREES: SAME PLAYBOOK DIFFERENT PLAYS FOR EGYPT
By Teshome Abebe

March 22, 2014 

But of all the inexplicable opposition to the GERD, the voices being heard from Egypt are the most intractable. There is no hiding the fact that Egypt would as soon not see the progress of the GERD in line with its long opposition to the development of the Nile Basin countries, particularly Ethiopia. This opposition has been documented time and again, and it is not necessary to repeat them here. Suffice it to state as bizarre the most recent declaration by some within Egypt that they would plant the entire Sudanese and Egyptian deserts with green banana tress to create so much rainfall that it would render the GERD useless. The current disagreement over the GERD is a technical one. Ethiopia does not have a political, military or border disagreement with Egypt. In fact, Ethiopia has continued to be generous both with its goodwill as well as its accommodation of Egypt’s understandable anxiety over the dam and the Nile. But what ought to be clear as well is that Ethiopia has no legal responsibility to Egyptians to provide them with plenty of water to use or even waste.


Ethiopia Sees Output at Africa’s Biggest Power Plant by 2015
Source: Bloomberg

Ethiopia will begin generating electricity within 18 months from what will be Africa’s largest power plant, the government said.The sale of 7.1 billion birr ($367 million) of bonds over the past three years to domestic investors, has contributed to the 27 billion birr spent so far on the 75.5 billion birr Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam hydropower project, said Zadig Abraha, deputy general director of the GERD national coordination office. The central bank in April 2011 ordered banks to buy government bonds equivalent to 27 percent of their loans to help fund infrastructure projects


Ethiopia's clothes firms aim to fashion global sales
By James Jeffrey Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 

Source: BBC News

Models wearing Yefikir clothingEthiopian fashion designer Fikirte Addis kneels down and wraps a tape measure around the waist of a customer, before scribbling on a piece of paper on which the outline of a flowing gown takes shape. The customer, Rihana Aman, owns a cafe in the capital, Addis Ababa, and went to Ms Fikirte's shop in the city, Yefikir Design, for a wedding dress fitting. The dress, however, is actually for her sister, who lives and works in London, but will soon return to her homeland with her English fiance.


Ethiopia and U.S. to join anti-corruption drive
(Reuters) - Ethiopia, the United States and Papua New Guinea are on course to join the leading world initiative to combat corruption in the energy and mining industries. The Oslo-based Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) approved their applications on Wednesday, drawing swift criticism from human rights campaigners for admitting Ethiopia. The three now have three years comply with EITI standards. Ethiopia has no proven petroleum reserves and a small mining industry driven by potash producers. Rights activists accuse it of political repression.


Folder Header: Nepotism and misappropriation as management practices within the African Peer Review Mechanism 
By Ramata Sore 
1st article: Do The UNDP and the European Union encourage poor governance? 
This is the question that one needs to ask himself. These two international institutions for several years are informed of misappropriation that take place in the APRM. But their lethargy toward this situation has fuelled an environment conducive to discrediting the APRM, its leaders, and by extension the African continent.


The Ethiopia Eritrea No War No Peace Situation has to End

By Tariku Debretsion

The Horn of Africa is the most conflict ridden region in the world. The people and the land are devastated by endless wars. The de facto no war no peace policy that has persisted between Ethiopia and Eritrea for the last 13 years affects the lives of millions in both countries and the stability of the whole region. Bringing this conflict to a peaceful resolution is of paramount importance. The devastating 1998 - 2000 war between Ethiopia and Eritrea cost billions of dollars in infrastructure damage, missed investment opportunities and lost aid, claimed about 100,000 lives, and dislocated millions  of people. Instead of the end of the war bringing peace, for the last fourteen years the policy of both countries has been “no war no peace.”  As bad as open war is, an endless no war no peace situation is insufferable. 


Professor Raymond Jonas
Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, 1985

I am a historian of the modern era. My most recent work concerns African resistance to European expansion. The Battle of Adwa: African Victory in the Age of Empire (Harvard, 2011) aims both to narrate this signal event in global history and to follow the Adwa story as it rolls through African and European diasporic communities. A companion web site BattleOfAdwa.org augments and extends this work.http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51CMLM0AgKL._SY344_PJlook-inside-v2,TopRight,1,0_SH20_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
Earlier work elaborated the political culture of counter-revolution, notably in art, architecture, and ritual. France and the Cult of the Sacred Heart: an Epic Tale for Modern Times (California, 2000) explores key features of the cold civil war that simmered for over a century after the Revolution of 1789. The Tragic Tale of Claire Ferchaud and the Great War (California, 2005) adopts the biographical form to follow an unusual personality as she navigates the boundary between divine inspiration and hysteria. Industry and Politics in Rural France, 1870-1914 (Cornell, 1994) subverts the conventional story of the making of the European working class by focusing on unconventional members of it.


Book Review: Essays on the Socio-Political and Economic Perspectives of Ethiopia
Francisco Goya, documenting the Spanish Wars of the 19th Century in scores of his paintings, demonstrated history can be presented in one of many ways – through the art of colors on canvass. Such is Professor Desta Asayehegn’s Essays on the Socio-Political and Economic Perspectives of Ethiopia, a fast paced work of art which has fourteen essays that can be seen as independent and stand-alone chapters on historic epochs of Ethiopia, but are in reality a well crafted and carefully documented series on the history of Ethiopia spanning the last hundred years. These essays focus on the interaction between the major and underlying economic forces, both on, and by international and domestic actors, and how Ethiopia’s history progressed from the era of Menelik and Italian invasion and occupation to develop into what we have today. 


Overcoming Water Scarcity Problem in Ethiopia

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

March 12, 2014 መጋቢት 3 2006

In anticipation of World Water Day, which will be observed on March 22, the Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA) presents ideas and strategies to overcome the problem of water scarcity and water public works in Ethiopia. It may sound paradoxical for Ethiopians (the people of the Blue Nile) to go thirsty when their country, in fact, is the source of all waters that replenish the gift of life for the neighboring peoples. But, that is the stark reality now. Therefore, this Amharic article proposes several methods to solve water shortage problems in Ethiopian communities and IDEA hopes they will be implemented and effectively reverse the current problem that has afflicted many districts in the country.


February 10, 2014
What happened to the African Renaissance?
Postliberation Eritrea

Special issue of the journal Africa Today, Volume 60.2
Guest editor: Tekle M. Woldemikael AFT-60_2-Cover-1
Twenty years ago, Eritrea conducted a successful referendum, gaining independent state status. It received recognition as a new African Renaissance state, and was on the forefront of African renewal and rebirth, which included the nations of South Africa, Namibia, Uganda, and Ethiopia as well. This occurred after many gloomy years of pessimism about progress, stability, and democracy in Africa. In the 1990s, a series of African nationalist liberation movements gained power that stimulated international and local observers’ imagination for the dawning of an African Renaissance. There was hope that the Pan-Africanist dream of African unity would bring a new level of continental unity, economic growth, and political stability. This task rested on the shoulders of a new generation of African leaders


Imperialism in Africa, its Implications and the Way forward for African People
I think lack of a strong & far visionary and patriotic leadership in Africa with impeccable commitment to Africa’s cause is problem number one to the continent today. My understanding is that behind every success or failure, there is a factor of leadership. For example, it is painful really that in the today’s 21st Century, we still have leaders many of whom are sectarian including at presidential level.


The Somalization of Eritrea: Stuck at Its Fluid Stage of Totalitarianism
Source Asmerino.com

The melting down of the nation state Eritrea, as displayed in its institutional, economic, infrastructural, military, political and demographic meltdowns, has now reached its highest level. Even though these meltdowns keep feeding on one another to reach the critical stages they are at, it is the demographic one that is driving the nation to the brink of collapse, in the process hollowing out the army, the labor force, the family, the villages, towns and cities, and eventually the nation itself. If one of those self-proclaimed nations in Somalia – Somaliland, Puntland, etc – were to find itself in fear of further fragmentation, it would have been natural to ask whether that has to do with itself being the result of fragmentation from the bigger Somalia. If so, it would also be natural to raise a similar question in regard to Eritrea.


Africa’s Next Oil Frontier – Ethiopia?

Source OilPrice
Sitting athwart the headwaters of the Blue Nile, Ethiopia has long seen its energy future in its hydropower potential, being able to export electricity to neighboring countries.
That picture may be about to be somewhat altered however. British oil firm New Age (African Global Energy) Ltd works a concession in Ethiopia’s southeastern Ogaden basin blocs 7-8 and its Adigala lease with its Canadian oil firm partner Africa Oil. For the moment, Ethiopia is pressing forward with its grandiose hydroelectric plans, most notably the $4.2 billion, 6,000-megawatt Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam on the Blue Nile, which has unsettled Egypt. Egypt fears that the dam’s completion would diminish 20 percent of its Nilotic water flow, leading Cairo last month to demand Ethiopia suspend construction work on the dam on the Nile’s main tributary. After Ethiopia rejected Egypt's demand Egypt vowed to protect its "historical rights" to the Nile "at any cost." 


A Wretched of the Earth Ethiopian Genius
February 26, 2014

The Ancient Egyptian Kemetic creation theory and the Big Bang creation theory of the universe have something in common: Void. Out of nothing (empty space) came out something. This Ethiopian genius, whose name is Ishak Ayiris also came out from an impoverished Ethiopian parents, who had nothing and who were in fact wretched of the earth, to borrow Fanon’s book title. Ishak has now a bright future and the Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA), with pleasure, brings the story of Ishak Ayiris to the attention of its readers. Please read!
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/eton-college-council-estate-kid-3185903 


Critique on and Supplement to Bank Sector Reform in Ethiopia

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD   February 24, 2014

This essay, as its title suggests, intends to critique and supplement Bank Sector Reform in Ethiopia by Drs. Desta Asayehgn and Admassu Bezabeh that was published by (IDEA) Inc. (www.africanidea.org/Banking_sector_in_Ethiopia.html). I found their abstract interesting, especially in some parts where the authors present sound arguments and are leveled against government policies as constructive criticism, and I will endorse the ideas that I agree with. On some of their ideas, however, I have different views, reservations and disagreements; hence I will critique those ideas in an effort to make input and insight for future considerations. 


THE NILE WATER ISSUE AND…
A PEACEFUL SOLUTION SUGGESTED MANY YEARS AGO…

Open Letter to Prime Minister Meles Zenawi
by G. E. Gorfu

H.E. Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, Sir: The BBC's Mike Thomson (Feb. 3, 2005) reports: "Mr. Meles says he is becoming increasingly angry at Egypt's long running objections to requests from other Nile basin nations to use the river's waters for major irrigation projects… While Egypt is taking the Nile water to transform the Sahara Desert into something green, we in Ethiopia - who are the source of 85% of that water - are denied the possibility of using it to feed ourselves. And we are being forced to beg for food every year..."1


Ethiopian origin in Seattle at Yesler Community Center pledge to buy bonds

Ethiopian observer staff

On February 16, 2014 at Yesler Community Center in Seattle,  Ethiopians welcomed high ranking officials accompanied by Deputy the Consul General Consulate General of Ethiopia Weizero Mebrat Beyane, Weizero  Fikerte Tamir W/Agegnehue Civil Associations and other Structure & Event Organization Directorate Directors, and Ato Zadig  Abraha, Coordination of Public Participation on the Construction of the Grand Renaissance Dam, and the Deputy General Director to discuss about the Millennium Dam which will be the largest hydroelectric power plant in Africa when completed and create one of the continent’s largest reservoirs. As speakers noted after the completion of the Millennium Dam, we Ethiopians will restore our past glory and contribute, not only transforming the lives of our people, but also improving the climate of our continent by producing  clean energy to our neighbors. In June, a panel of international experts tasked with studying the impacts of the Ethiopian dam on lower riparian countries, including Sudan and Egypt, found that the dam project will not cause significant harm to either country.



Banking Sector Reform in Ethiopia: An Abstract


Admassu Bezabeh, Ph.D, School of Business and Leadership, Dominican University of California San Rafael, California 


Desta, Asayehgn, Ph.D. School of Business and Leadership , Dominican University of California, San Rafael, California.
 
The fragile and inefficient state-dominated banking sector that existed in Ethiopia during the military government (1974-1991) was a major hindrance to economic growth. Since it took power in 1991, the current government has implemented a number of reforms. For instance, in 1994, the government legalized domestic private investment in the banking industry. In addition, it restructured the two development banks as commercial banks, and introduced a new Banking and Monetary Proclamation that gave more autonomy and further clarified the National Bank of Ethiopia’s activities as the regulator and supervisor of the banking sector. 


Press release: What is working to end FGM in East Africa

“An estimated 3 million girls in Africa are at risk of female genital mutilation (FGM) every year. In other words a girl is cut every 10 seconds. This is a shocking and shameful statistic as FGM is already recognised as a human rights violation and there are laws against it in most of the countries where it takes place,” says Dr Ann-Marie Wilson, Executive Director of anti FGM charity 28 Too Many. “This is an international problem requiring urgent action in all countries where FGM is practised.”


Economist: Manufacturing in Africa: An Awakening Giant
February 7, 2014 

A quiet boom in manufacturing in Africa is already taking place. Farming and services are still dominant, backed by the export of commodities, but new industries are emerging in a lot of African countries." Less than an hour's drive outside Ethiopia's capital, Addis Ababa, a farmer walks along a narrow path on a green valley floor after milking his cows. Muhammad Gettu is carrying two ten-litre cans to a local market, where he will sell them for less than half of what they would fetch at a dairy in the city. Sadly, he has no transport. A bicycle sturdy enough to survive unpaved tracks would be enough to double his revenues. At the moment none is easily available. But that may be about to change. A construction boom is fostering access to high-voltage power. The spread of mobile telephony, including mobile banking, helps small suppliers struggling with overheads. IBM, an American computer giant with an eye on Africa, goes so far as to say that “software is the manufacturing of the future”. Consumers will still want to buy hardware, but growing local demand is creating a market for African app and software developers


Ethiopia and Egypt spar over the Nile
By Hassen Hussein 

Al Jazeera Opinion

On Jan. 8, Ethiopia turned down Egypt’s demand that it suspend construction of its mega-dam on the Nile, further escalating tensions between the two states. Fearing that Ethiopia’s $4.2 billion project would reduce the river’s flow, Egypt calls for a halt in construction until the dam’s downstream impact is determined. Otherwise, it has vowed to protect its “historical rights” to the Nile at “any cost.” While scoffing at Egyptian threats, Ethiopia has called for Cairo’s collaboration in negotiations and claims that the dam will have no adverse effect on Egypt. It would, in fact, decrease evaporation and improve water flow. Ethiopia hopes that the ambitious hydroelectric project, slated to be completed in 2017, would catapult the country out of poverty. Frustrated by what it described as Ethiopia’s stubborn stance, Cairo is threatening to take the issue to the United Nations Security Council.


Ethiopia and Egypt clash over mega-dam - UPI
KHARTOUM, Sudan, Feb. 7 (UPI) -- Egypt and Ethiopia remain at loggerheads over Addis Ababa's plan to build a $4.2 billion, 6,000-megawatt dam on a major tributary of the Nile River that Cairo says will greatly reduce the flow of water that is Egypt's lifeline. Tension between the two African states rose sharply in January after Ethiopia rejected Egypt's demand it suspend construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam on the Blue Nile, the main tributary of the 4,130-mile river, the world's longest. Egypt has vowed to protect its "historical rights" to the Nile "at any cost" and says it could lose 20 percent of its water if the giant dam in northwestern Ethiopia, one of several hydroelectric projects planned by Addis Ababa, is completed.


Robert Reich Explains the War on the Poor and Working Families
By Nick Berning. Friday, February 7 2014

Connect the dots between policies that keep many of our fellow Americans desperate, and you’ll see they add up to a war on the poor and working families. Robert Reich explains:


Analysis of Kaizen Implementation

in Northern Ethiopia’s Manufacturing Industries

Desta, Asayehgn, Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Dominican University of California;  and Hadush Berhe Asgedom, lecturer, Industrial Engineering Program;  Alula Gebresas, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering Program; and Mengstu Asheber, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering Program, Makelle University, Tigrai, Ethiopia

Abstract

From the ashes of the Second World War, Japan through its culturally embedded innovative management system has succeeded in rebuilding an economy that is emulated by the community of nations (Waheed, etal., 2010). For example, in the 1980s, the manufacturing industry in Japan showed a significant growth through the adoption of the kaizen process of management. The key elements of the Japanese management system and the kaizen strategy were embedded to achieve a never-ending journey towards increasing productivity, and efficiency, and to foster the spirit of quality improvement. In order to stay competitive in an increasingly global marketplace with increasing customer demands, by following Japan’s example, a number of Ethiopian-based manufacturing  companies are using the kaizen management approach to lower costs of production, minimize waste, improve productivity, boost quality, and achieve sustainability


Telecom Deal by China ZTE, Huawei In Ethiopia Faces Criticism 
For Ethiopians, a Chinese Telecom Project Changes Lives but Draws Scrutiny
By MATTHEW DALTON


Eight Business Benefits of Resuming Economic Relations Between Ethiopia and Eritrea –

 By Tony Carroll   Contributor: Natnael A / January 31, 2014 
Ethiopia and Eritrea ceased business relations upon the commencement of the border war in 1998. While a small amount of barter trade still exists, it is fair to say that trade relations between the two countries are non-existent – this is very much to the detriment of the private sectors in both countries (and across the region). - See more at: s reported by my friends Ambassadors Cohen, Shinn and Lyman, this appears to be a moment of inflection in the relationship between Eritrea and Ethiopia. Certainly the implementation of the border agreement and the resumption of commercial relations will not be an easy process. However, the economic benefits that would accrue to both countries could be substantial and should motivate leadership in both to expedite the process. - See more at: 


Increase the Ethiopia ICT
Monday, February 3rd, 2014 

Monica Chung (info@koreaittimes.com) 
SEOUL, KOREA - This is a freedom story all the world should have to know.
2It all starts in July 25, 1950 when war broke out in Korea. The Korean war kills about 1.4 million soldiers and 374,00 civilians. the only reason of the war was the need of freedom by the Korean people. At that time crossing 15,000 kilometers distance to participate in the foreign country war was almost impossible. Its difficult to think the present Korean advancement and development without the help of 1270 Ethiopian soldiers who came to Korean land to maintain peace and freedom.


Global Voices: Stemming the African brain drain
Times Colonist January 24, 2014 

Last year the Canadian health-care system managed to save $400 million — by poaching trained doctors from the poorest and most vulnerable communities in the world. A recent study by the University of Ottawa indicates that even as Canadian aid programs help Africa to build better health-care systems, our health-care system is taking away their doctors. According to Canada-based CUSO International, between 1990 and 2006, Ethiopia trained 3,700 doctors. Only 700 of them stayed to work there. Africa’s health-care system isn’t the only sector hemorrhaging skilled workers — there are more African-born engineers and scientists living in Canada and the U.S. than in all of Africa. - See more 


War tops talks as African leaders gather in Ethiopia for AU summit
Source: AFP

ADDIS ABABA — Conflict and humanitarian crises rather than growing economies and development top the agenda for African leaders this week as they meet for a summit of the continental bloc.
War in the Central African Republic (CAR) and South Sudan are key priorities, Ethiopian Foreign Minister Tedros Adhanom said ahead of the two-day African Union (AU) meeting that opens on Thursday. The controversial role on the continent of the International Criminal Court (ICC) is also expected to be addressed.


Ethiopia: "Time to bring back Eritrea from the cold" - A reply to Ambassador Cohen
Ethiopia: "Time to bring back Eritrea from the cold"

A reply to Ambassador Cohen 
By Minga Negash* 

Many observers agree that recent unfortunate developments in the Middle East can easily spillover to the Greater Horn of Africa region. There are groups that are fanning ideologies advanced by the various actors in Middle East’s sectarian conflict. In the light of the new developments in the region, it makes sense for the United States to review its relationship with Eritrea and Ethiopia and rebalance its portfolio. The interesting question for Eritrea and Ethiopia is therefore how to respond to the apparent shift in superpower policy towards the region. In this rejoinder I review the recent articles that were written by two former Ambassadors, examine the difficult areas in the relationship between Eritrea and Ethiopia, and outline the options that are available for Ethiopia.


First broadcast: Brain drain Ethiopian Docators

Wednesday 06 April 2011Migration of trained medical staff is an issue faced by countries all over the world. But Ethiopia’s brain drain has left just one doctor for nearly 30,000 people. How can a country with some of the worst health problems cope with such a loss of its human health resources? Even fewer doctors work in rural regions where the majority of the country’s population lives. So what’s driving doctors away and what measures are being taken to keep them in the country? 
     Claudia Hammond travels to Ethiopia to find out more about their medical brain drain. There she meets medical students to find out why they want to work abroad. She meets the country’s Health Minister to find out about his measures to keep doctors in the country and why he hopes quadrupling the number of medical students helps tackle the problem. She also talks to a general practitioner working in Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa to find out what working life for an Ethiopian doctor is really like


press release 
Jan. 27, 2014, 6:01 a.m. EST 

Tigray Announces Initial Terakimti Mineral Resource Estimate at the Harvest Project in Ethiopia
VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, Jan 27, 2014 (Marketwired via COMTEX) -- Tigray Resources Inc. CA:TIG +25.00% ("Tigray" or the "Company") is pleased to announce its initial National Instrument 43-101 Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects ("NI 43-101") compliant gold, copper, silver and zinc mineral resource estimate for the Terakimti volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposit on the Company's 70%-owned Harvest project (the "Harvest Project") located in the Arabian Nubian Shield in northern Ethiopia. This mineral resource estimate is contained within the first prospect discovered at the Harvest Project in 2009 and incorporates 16,495 metres of drilling in 79 diamond drill holes


Move over quinoa, Ethiopia's teff poised to be next big super grain
Rich in calcium, iron and protein, gluten-free teff offers Ethiopia the promise of new and lucrative markets in the west.MDG : Mounds of teff grain dry in fields in Ethiopia
At Addis Ababa airport, visitors are greeted by pictures of golden grains, minute ochre-red seeds and a group of men gathered around a giant pancake. Billboards boast: "Teff: the ultimate gluten-free crop!"Ethiopia is one of the world's poorest countries, well-known for its precarious food security situation. But it is also the native home of teff, a highly nutritious ancient grain increasingly finding its way into health-food shops and supermarkets in Europe and America.Teff's tiny seeds – the size of poppy seeds – are high in calcium, iron and protein, and boast an impressive set of amino acids. Naturally gluten-free, the grain can substitute for wheat flour in anything from bread and pasta to waffles and pizza bases. Like quinoa, the Andean grain, teff's superb nutritional profile offers the promise of new and lucrative markets in the west.


A Special Love for Assimba:  A Psychological Catharsis for 'Kahsay Abraha Besrat'

Asayehgn Desta, Sarlo Distinguished Professor Sustainable Economic Development January 4, 2014, I drove from San Rafael to Oakland, California, for about forty-five minutes to have a get-together dinner with one of my best friends, Kidane Haile and learn more about the innovative projects that he is undertaking in Kenya, Nigeria and Morocco.  In the course of our discussion, the owner of the restaurant came and showed us a book entitled “Ya Assimba Fekere” or My Special Love for Assimba.”


Ethiopian Foreign Policy & How the Delicate Balance of diplomacy and negotiation should be maintained

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD                                  

IDEA Editorial January 25, 2014

Since the beginnings of people-to-people and state-to-state interaction thousands of years ago, the Horn of Africa has always been a troubled region and by comparison the most volatile and unstable area in Africa. The impetus behind these continuous conflicts is partly induced by geopolitics and foreign intervention and partly engendered by complex mode of productions as well as the mindset and lack of vision of the people.  


South Sudan, rebels sign cease-fire
By ELIAS MESERET 

The Associated Press  ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — 
South Sudan's government and rebels signed a cease-fire deal Thursday that leaders hope will put a pause to five weeks of warfare that has killed thousands of soldiers and civilians. The peace deal represents the first real progress since political friction turned violent Dec. 15, fueling countrywide battles with ethnic overtones. But questions were immediately raised about whether all fighters in South Sudan would abide by the agreement, and how long others would follow it.


Africa: White House On U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit
By Office of the Press Secretary, 21 January 2014 

The White House is pleased to announce that the United States will host the first U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit in Washington, DC on August 5 and 6, 2014. President Obama looks forward to welcoming leaders from across the African continent to the Nation's Capital to further strengthen ties with one of the world's most dynamic and fastest-growing regions. The Summit will build on the progress made since the President's trip to Africa last summer, advance the Administration's focus on trade and investment in Africa, and highlight America's commitment to Africa's security, its democratic development, and its people.


In vigilant defense of press freedom
The Ethiopian Reporter

Article 29 of the Ethiopian constitution explicitly guarantees freedom of the press and provides that the press shall, as an institution, enjoy legal protection to ensure its operational independence and its capacity to entertain diverse opinions. This provision is a replica of Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Article 29 enshrines the right to hold opinions without interference, as well as the right to freedom of expression without any interference including freedom to seek, receive and impart information through any medium of one’s choice. It also prohibits any form of censorship and stipulates that any citizen who violates any legal limitations on the exercise of these rights may be held liable under the law.


WATER IS LIFE… FIGHTING FOR THE NILE WATERS
by G. E. GORFU

If the case is decided in favor of Ethiopia and the other rightful owners of the Nile, it is doubtful Egypt will quietly accept and abide by that decision either, and is most likely to declare a war. It is imperative, therefore, and of the highest importance, that Ethiopia and the other Nile nations immediately form a united front and prepare for that eventuality, to defend themselves by any and all means against an aggressor that seems only too eager to declare a war. This issue might still have to be decided on the battlefield, and the final chapter written in blood on the sands of the Egyptian desert.


Egypt may take Nile dam dispute with Ethiopia to UN
After all attempts to solve the Egyptian-Ethiopian crisis over the Renaissance Dam at the negotiating table ended in failure after a third round of negotiations on Jan. 4, with Egypt withdrawing from the discussions and conferences being held in Khartoum, there is now talk at the governmental level about internationalizing the issue. At the same time, Egypt is witnessing rising popular demands to resort to the UN Security Council to establish Egypt’s right to veto the establishment of the Renaissance Dam, given the potential danger it represents to Egyptian water security.


Ethiopian Emperor Places Wreath on Dr. King’s Grave 
Haile Selassie Visited Atlanta Tomb of Civil Rights Leader July 11, 1969 A.P

Happy Birthday (Tribute Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday) -- St 


The desperate and hostile nature of Egyptian move against Ethiopia
Posted by Awramba Times on January 21, 2014 

By W.Yilma
Egyptian relation with Ethiopia lack coherence and logic. Leave alone for political observers, it is not hard for ordinary person to understand the desperate, demonic and deceptive motives of the Egyptian “politicians” towards Ethiopia when it comes to the Nile water issues. We are witnessing to observe the infantile and uncivilized diplomatic maneuverings and dirty games the Egyptians are perusing for many years. The Egyptian traditional animosity became more apparent since the start of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) construction.


Ethiopia: Keepers of the Lost Ark?
Ed's Note: This article was first published in 2007.

Christians in Ethiopia have long claimed to have the ark of the covenant. Our reporter investigated
By Paul Raffaele
SMITHSONIAN MAGAZINE 

"They shall make an ark of acacia wood," God commanded Moses in the Book of Exodus, after delivering the Israelites from slavery in Egypt. And so the Israelites built an ark, or chest, gilding it inside and out. And into this chest Moses placed stone tablets inscribed with the Ten Commandments, as given to him on Mount Sinai. Thus the ark “was worshipped by the Israelites as the embodiment of God Himself,” writes Graham Hancock in The Sign and the Seal. "Biblical and other archaic sources speak of the Ark blazing with fire and light...stopping rivers, blasting whole armies." (Steven Spielberg's 1981 film Raiders of the Lost Ark provides a special-effects approximation.) According to the First Book of Kings, King Solomon built the First Temple in Jerusalem to house the ark. It was venerated there during Solomon's reign (c. 970-930 B.C.) and beyond.


Beyond remittances, diaspora and development
By IRIN | Thursday, January 9 2014 

The African diaspora and migrants have for years been instrumental in helping family and friends at home get by, as huge annual remittance flows illustrate, but their contributions beyond remittances could have a significant impact on development, if tapped into. According to the World Bank, African diaspora savings, at $53 billion every year, exceed annual remittances to the continent and are mostly invested abroad." If one in every 10 members of the diaspora could be persuaded to invest $1,000 in his or her country of origin, Africa could raise $3 billion a year for development financing,” Dilip Ratha and Sonia Plaza write in the World Bank’s 2011 report, Diaspora for Development in Africa.


Renaissance dam right on track: Ethiopia irrigation minister 
Contradicting earlier statements by Egypt Irrigation Ministry official, Ethiopian minister says on Monday Grand Renaissance Dam faces neither financial nor technical problems Ethiopian Minister of Irrigation and Energy Alemayehu Tegenu said on Monday the process of building the Ethiopian Grand Renaissance Dam was on track without difficulties, adding that the project will be completed on schedule. The Ethiopian minister's words contrast with statements made by the Egyptian Irrigation Ministry Spokesman Khaled Waseef who, on 8 January, said in a press statement the Ethiopian Grand Renaissance Dam faces financial as well as technical problems, as reported by MENA.


King Menelik Has Investments Here November 7, 1909

Abyssinia’s Ruler said to be a Heavy Buyer of America Railways Stock

Today the Abyssinian ruler has extended the range of his financial operations to the United States, and is a heavy investor in American Railroads. What with his American Securities and his French and Belgian mining investments. Menelik has a private fortune estimated at no less than twenty- five million dollars.



The new face of agriculture in arid Ethiopia?

By ANDUALEM SISAY in Addis Ababa | Wednesday, January 1 Source Africa Review
On a sunny afternoon in Huruta Dore town some 200 kilometers south-east of the capital Addis Ababa young riders on their motorbikes noisily kick up some dust. They are the emerging generation of well-to-do farmers of Ethiopia who are reaping from using irrigation. Found in Arsi zone of the Oromia region of the country, this semi-desert town has been known as a drought area, with the inhabitants used to relying on wheat aid. Today, its over 500 hectares of land is teeming with a rich cover of various crops and vegetables. Due to the regional government diverting the Awash River to pass through the town five years ago, it is no longer desert.


A Proven Strategy to End Conflict in South Sudan
By Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Kulwant Singh and Dr. David Leffler

A new technology of defense is now available that has been scientifically shown to prevent war and create peace by harnessing the deepest level of nature's functioning.
War is ultimately a human problem requiring a human solution. Experts in the field of conflict resolution maintain that the underlying cause of war is accumulated "social stress" - i.e., mounting political, religious and/or ethnic tensions between rival factions in critical hotspots throughout the world. As social stress builds, divisions grow stronger, groups take sides, diplomats become unable to resolve differences, and enemies arise within or outside the nation.


An open letter to an inquisitive young Ethiopian sister 
Ethiopian history is not three thousand years!

Dear Beloved Ethiopian Sister,
Thank you very much for your important question about the origin and extent of Ethiopian history.
Thank you for inspiring me to write this response.  I am prompted to write the response to your question in a public forum. I do so because many of your doubting friends to whom you refer would also be able to see my answers. You write, “Edeminot, I would like to ask you something if you have [the] time. [Many] people … specially the young…have doubts about our 3000 years history … they ask [for] evidence... Some comment that[one ethnic group] wrote the history like they want… [But] they doubt if our history is even 100 years…. Can you suggest [to] me [a] good book… about Ethiopia?


Reflections on Africa Competitiveness Report 2013

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

December 27, 2013

The Africa Competitiveness Report 2013, put out by the World Economic Forum (WE Forum), is a comprehensive analysis and critique of the overall development status of thirty-eight African countries. It has also recommendations on how Africa can uplift itself and successfully become part of the global economy. Based on the World Bank and the African Development Bank (AfDB) data base and recommendations, the Report makes a thorough assessment of African countries’ economic parameters, ranging from their use of information technology to regional integration in the context of other successful countries outside Africa, as well as developed nations that could become major foreign direct investment (FDI) potentials. 


Ethiopian history is not three thousand years! (Ephraim Isaac, PhD)
Posted by admin on December 28, 2013 

You write, “Edeminot, I would like to ask you something if you have [the] time. [Many] people … specially the young…have doubts about our 3000 years history … they ask [for] evidence… Some comment that[one ethnic group] wrote the history like they want… [But] they doubt if our history is even 100 years…. Can you suggest [to] me [a] good book… about Ethiopia? Thank you, Sir”[M.B.]
I have always known young Ethiopians to be bright and inquisitive. Over 600 years ago it was written in Mashafa Berhan (please see my own translation The Book of Light, EJ Brill,1973) from Emperor Zar’aYa’eqob (1434-68) time: “all the peoples of Ethiopia are thirsty for knowledge”. So, I am really not surprised to know that our young continue the ancient tradition of our people to be thirsty for knowledge. I am especially happy that they are inquisitive about our common history. May the Almighty bless them and open the door for them to learn and teach.


Egypt's minister says new Ethiopian dam won’t affect Egypt’s water supply
Source: Daily News Egypt

Minister Mohamed Abdel Moteleb says a new dam in Gondar will not affect water flow to Lake Nasser
The construction of a new dam in Ethiopia will not affect the supply of water flowing to Egypt, said Egyptian Minister of Irrigation and Water Resources on Saturday.
Construction on the Megech Dam, located near the Ethiopian city of Gondar, began earlier this month and has been allocated funding of approximately USD $125m, according to privately-owned Ethiopian Walta and its Information and Public Relations Center. The dam is planned to hold 1.8 billion cubic metres of water when it is constructed, and will be used for irrigation purposes and drinking water for Gondar.


Research uncovers lost African school of painting
Analysis of illuminated gospels suggests that first Christian manuscript art may have come from Ethiopia

By Martin Bailey. News, Issue 252, December 2013


Evidence has emerged for a previously unknown school of painting in sub-Saharan Africa that may have been responsible for the earliest Christian paintings in manuscripts. New research suggests that illuminations in two Ethiopian gospels dating back 1,500 years were painted in the ancient kingdom of Aksum, and not in the Middle East, as previously believed.  These illustrations, which include a set of the Evangelists, are evidence of an Aksumite School of painting, says Jacques Mercier, a specialist in Ethiopian art at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris. Aksum lies in northern Ethiopia. If Mercier’s theory is correct, it sheds new light on the development of early Christian art.


Ethiopia: Djibouti Gives Ethiopia Cargo Ultimatum
By Tamrat G. Giorgis, 15 December 2013

Release of cargo will change come January, according to the ultimatum, which some believe to be in breach of a bilateral agreement. The government of Djibouti has given a deadline of January 15, 2014, for challenging the manner in which cargo is released from its ports. The new rules will state that no cargo inbound to Ethiopia will be released until the clearing agent in Djibouti produces a note from banks stating that foreign exchange to pay for transport, transit and forwarding services has actually been transferred. A circular instructing offices in Djibouti to this effect has been distributed by the government, according to diplomatic sources in Djibouti.


Eritrea: Time to Bring Eritrea in From the Cold
By Hank Cohen, 16 December 2013 
analysis

After being part of Ethiopia for forty years, the people of Eritrea held a referendum in April 1993 and decided to establish an independent state. The referendum took place in the aftermath of a thirty-year insurgency against two successive Ethiopian regimes waged by the Eritrean Peoples Liberation Front (EPLF). At the same time, an allied insurgent group, the Tigrean Peoples Liberation Front (TPLF), took over power in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, after the military collapse of the Soviet-supported regime headed by President Mengistu Haile Mariam.


Ethiopia: Gilgel Gibe III Near Completion - to Go Operational in September
17 December 2013 

One of the biggest power generating projects in Ethiopia, the Gilgel Gibe III, is expected to go fully operational on September 2014. H.E. Ato Alemayehu Tegenu, Minister of Water, Irrigation and Energy said that so far 80% of construction work has been completed. One of the power projects planned to be commissioned within the GTP period, the Gilgel Gibe III will add 1,870MW electric power to the national grid upon its completion in September. 


“No political motive” behind Sudan’s support for Ethiopia’s Nile dam: ambassador
By Tesfa-Alem Tekle

December 14, 2013 (ADDIS ABABA) – Sudan’s support to Ethiopia’s controversial dam project is not politically driven, Sudan’s ambassador to Ethiopia said on Friday.


The 5 Poorest Countries in the World
by Dan Carroll, The Motley Fool Dec 14th 2013 3:05PM
Updated Dec 14th 2013 
4: Eritrea, $705 GDP per capita


Ethiopia continues to be shaped by its long history and its policy

Ethiopian Observer editors

A wonderful spectacle and a colorful Ethiopia-Somali origin State, hosted the 8th Nations and Nationalities Day on Sunday in Seattle at the Kings Hall. The celebration was attended by the Honorable Ambassador Zerihun Retta, Consul General of Ethiopia at Los Angeles, the newly appointed former Director of Ethiopian Diaspora General Directorate of Ministry of Foreign Affairs Weizero Mebrat Beyane and over 350 Ethiopians. The Ethiopian Somalia community invited all Ethiopians in Seattle to celebrate the economic and political rights that have been guaranteed under the constitutional framework. The Ethiopian Somalis underscored the degree of liberty they have gained in education and economic opportunity. One of the highlights of the event that captured the imagination of the audience was the enthusiastic and upbeat attitude of the future generations’ promise to lead Ethiopia to prosperity. Each youth expressed what it takes to be a leader is respect, responsibility and to value your own culture and other cultures in order to create a social harmony that leads to solid foundation.

The man who taught Mandela to be a soldierBy Penny Dale
BBC Africa, Addis Ababa

General Tadesse Birru and Nelson MandelaIn July 1962, Col Fekadu Wakene taught South African political activist Nelson Mandela the tricks of guerrilla warfare - including how to plant explosives before slipping quietly away into the night.
Mr Mandela was in Ethiopia, learning how to be the commander-in-chief of Umkhonto we Sizwe - the armed wing of the African National Congress (ANC).The group had announced its arrival at the end of 1961 by blowing-up electricity pylons in various places in South Africa. Continue reading the main story “Then on 11 January 1962, Mr Mandela had secretly, and illegally, slipped out of South Africa. 
His mission was to meet as many African political leaders as possible and garner assistance for the ANC, including money and training for its military wing. And to be moulded into a soldier himself. During this trip, he visited Ethiopia twice and left a deep impression on those who met him during his stay in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa.


Israel's "Red Cross"' rejects blood from Ethiopia born lawmaker
AFP

Jerusalem — The refusal of Israel's equivalent of the Red Cross to accept blood from an Ethiopian Jewish lawmaker sparked demands on Wednesday for a review of guidelines seen as deeply discriminatory.The rejection of the blood from Pnina Tamano-Shata by an official of Magen David Adom came at a donor drive outside parliament and was caught on video footage which was widely aired by Israeli television channels."Under health ministry directives, we are unable to accept blood from donors of Ethiopian Jewish origin," the health official is heard to say as he spurns the donation.
Top Magen David Adom officials later agreed they could take Tamano-Shata's blood, but only to freeze it, not to put it into the national blood bank, the Ynet news website reported


Somalia: U.S. Blames Eritrea Still Supporting Al Shabab Militant Group in Somalia
December 9, 2013 

The U.S state department has blamed again that Eritrea is still supporting Somalia's militant group Al Shabab. A report by the state department has blamed that Eritrean officials were in Somalia's Lower Shabelle region to give training and other mechanical support to Al Shabab fighters in Somalia, battling against the Federal Government forces and the African Union troops (AMISOM). The report did not name the individuals from Eritrea in Somalia. Also Somali Government sources could not confirm the existence of such Eritrean presence in its territory. Eritrea has been always blamed for supporting the militant group of Al Shabab, a claim Asmara regime constantly denied.


A new species of horse, 4.4 million years old
CLEVELAND—Two teams of researchers, including a scientist from Case Western Reserve University, have announced the discovery of a new species of fossil horse from 4.4 million-year-old fossil-rich deposits in Ethiopia. About the size of a small zebra, Eurygnathohippus woldegabrieli—named for geologist Giday WoldeGabriel, who earned his PhD at Case Western Reserve in 1987—had three-toed hooves and grazed the grasslands and shrubby woods in the Afar Region, the scientists say.


Members of the Ethiopian Diaspora residing in Seattle will celebrate the Ethiopian Nations, Nationalities and People's Day at Kings Hall 2929 27th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98144 December 15, 2013 at 2.00PM  

Cultural Exchange Festival of Nations and Nationalities in Jijiga 

Ethiopia Somali Regional State, Jijiga Hostsed the 8th Nations and Nationalities Day on Sunday at the Capital of Jigjiga Somali Regional State. To be recall the celebration was attended by Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, Djiboutian President Ismail Omar Guelleh and observers from Rwanda and Kenya. Among the key note speakers were Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, Speaker of the House of Federation, Kassa Tekleberhan, Head of Somali Regional Sate, Abdi Mohammed Umer and Mayor of Jijiga. The Ethiopian Somalian community invites all Ethiopians in Seattle to celebrate the economic and political rights that have been guaranteed under the constitutional framework. Ambassador Zerihun Retta Consulate General of Ethiopia in LA and other ranking officials will be present.

Address: Kings Hall 2929 27th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98144 December 15, 2013 at 2.00PM

The Ethiopian Somalis know very well the degree of liberty they have gained. It is the price of their struggle that blossom. For the first time of Ethiopian history, Ethiopia is able to make commitment to eradicate discrimination guarantying the rights of nationalities self-determination principle of recognition. For majority of Ethiopian nationalities such arrangement is a keystone to eliminate inequalities and subjection of other dominant culture. Ethiopia will and can survival as a political entity only through recognized and understood civil and political right. One way the other the point is protecting the rights of nationalities to choose the political, economic and cultural autonomy without interference any form of imposition have created an atmosphere of solid unity and stability to propel Ethiopia as fast growing economy in the world.


Next on Egypt's to-do: Ethiopia and the Nile
Last updated: 15 hours ago

Water ministers meet in Sudan for latest round of talks on how to share Africa's fabled river.
Play a game of word association almost anywhere in the world, and if you try the word "Nile", the answer will be "Egypt". Herodotus famously said the country was a gift of the fabled river, and it's no exaggeration - given that Egypt is almost totally dependent on the Nile for water and agriculture. But upstream of Cairo, there's a country where the answer to the word association wouldn't be Egypt - where the people don't even call the it the Nile, and where more than 85 percent of the river's water originates. That place is Ethiopia, and it has enraged Egypt by starting to build a huge dam on the river.


Ethiopia and Eritrea: Brothers at war no more 
New internal and external dynamics are shaping the relations between the two countries.
Last updated: 08 Dec 2013 

A refugee crisis, high-level defections, and a recent mutiny in the army, are some of many indications that Afwerki's regime is facing an existential threat that may lead to its demise in the near future. Afwerki is now on "survival mode" and may engage in new and desperate gestures to prolong his time in power, such as opening up to the international community for dialogue and humanitarian aid. However, if his past behavior is anything to go by, such moves are only likely to be tactical survival maneuvers that will not reverse the current political trajectory. It is now time to think about what the relationship between these two states will look like without the two omnipresent strongmen that have heavily shaped their histories.


Tribute to Nelson Madiba Mandela 
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD
December 5, 2013

The great Nelson Mandela has departed; he left us for good but his soul, his ideas, and his openly declared determination for the liberation of his fellow Africans lives on. He himself foretold his passing when he remarked on the death of Walter Sisulu ten years ago. Sisulu’s “passing was not unexpected,” said Mandela, “we had long passed the age when either of us would protest against the brevity of life.” I made reference to the above quote in my eulogy article entitled “Sharing Nelson Mandela’s Grief over the Death of Walter Sisulu” in 2003. In that article, this is what I said in part: 


Clash of Civilizations Conundrum and Controversy in The Ethiopian Context
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

December 4, 2013

This essay is intended to address some important issues surrounding 'clash of civilizations' as discussed by Seife Hailu in his article entitled "Is the war of the west equal to the war on the rest? What can we learn from the anti-Ethiopians "wars" in Saudi Arabia?" This article was posted on www.tigraionline.com on November 20, 2013. I am interested in thematically highlighting the points I have concerns with only. Otherwise, the author has done a good job in his overall approach to solving or dealing with a problem, and I like to extend my gratitude to him. In the latter spirit, thus, I am going to make some input by way of critiquing the conceptual framework of ‘clash of civilizations’


Genomics and African Queens: Diversity Within Ethiopian Genomes Reveals Imprints of Historical Events
June 21, 2012 — Researchers have started to unveil the genetic heritage of Ethiopian populations, who are among the most diverse in the world, and lie at the gateway from Africa. They found that the genomes of some Ethiopian populations bear striking similarities to those of populations in Israel and Syria, a potential genetic legacy of the Queen of Sheba and her companions.The team detected mixing between some Ethiopians and non-African populations dating to approximately 3,000 years ago. The origin and date of this genomic admixture, along with previous linguistic studies, is consistent with the legend of the Queen of Sheba, who according to the Ethiopian Kebra Nagast book had a child with King Solomon from Israel and is mentioned in both the Bible and the Qur'an.


Ethiopia hailed as 'African lion' with fastest creation of millionaires
Michael Buerk's famished Ethiopia of 1984 has become a nation achieving 93% GDP growth in six years, finds study. Dawn. And as the sun breaks through the piercing chill of night on the plain outside Korem it lights up a biblical famine, now, in the 20th century. This place, say workers here, is the closest thing to hell on earth. "That television news report by the BBC's Michael Buerk in 1984 framed Ethiopia for a generation as a place of famine and in need of salvation.

African millionaires

 


The Great Ethiopian Run: in the footsteps of Haile Gebrselassie
It's a crazy, joyous race at 2,300m above sea level in Addis Ababa, and it's the adrenaline as well as the altitude that leaves competitors breathless after the Great Ethiopian Run


Dear fellow Ethiopians, our people’s problems are way far from over. We need to continue to UNITE and address the situation carefully and in a professional manner.  This is the time to come together and help the raped, beaten, tortured and murdered and their families. Dear all, I respectfully urge each one of us to donate everything we can. Let us share the burdens of our brothers and sisters. Please continue to support the voiceless immigrants by:
1. Forward and encourage others to sign the petition http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/stop-violence-against-5?mailing_id=17122&source=s.icn.em.cr&r_

by=9515510


Saudi Arabia Doubles Down on Abuse
Dawit Giorgis [2], David Andrew Weinberg [3] 
November 22, 2013
There are an estimated nine million foreign workers in Saudi Arabia, mostly doing jobs that Saudis themselves do not want to take. And so far, the sudden crackdown is mainly just causing disruptions to Saudi Arabia’s national economy. According to a story in the [6] [6]Saudi Gazette [6], twenty thousand schools in the country are now short of janitors, and 40 percent of small construction firms have stopped operations. One observer even counted thirteen facilities for the religious ritual of washing dead bodies that had been shuttered in Jeddah because the workers responsible for this thankless task had been forced to flee.


Radicalism as a challenge to Ethiopia
By AMAN SETHI
Source: The HINDU

Sporadic outbursts of violence across Ethiopia show how state intervention in religion has alienated sections of Muslim youth and generated the kind of anti-regime sentiments the government had hoped to defuse A knock on the door well after midnight. Mohammed Hassan Abdalla opens the door to find that a posse of policemen have come for his elder brother, Sheikh Abdulsalam Abdalla, a preacher in the local mosque in this rural settlement of Wabe, 300 km southwest of the Ethiopian capital, of Addis Ababa.


Ethiopia rejects Egypt’s request to build Renaissance Dam jointly 
Al-Masry Al-Youm 

The Turkish Anadolu news agency reported on Wednesday that Ethiopia rejected a request by Egypt to jointly build all stages of the Renaissance Dam so as to make sure that Egypt’s share of Nile water is not affected. The agency quoted an Ethiopian diplomat that attended a meeting between Egyptian Interim President Adli Mansour and Ethiopian Prime Minister Mariam Desalegn on the sidelines of the Arab-African summit in Kuwait as saying that Desalegn adhered to the Entebbe Convention and rejected any Egyptian supervision or participation in the construction of the dam.


The Tragedy of the Ethiopians in Saudi Arabia

Ethiopian Observer editors

The killings, torture or inhuman treatment of fellow Ethiopians and the deaf ear of the West that claims they have the highest regard for Humanity, seems to have lost their collective conscience. What is happening in Saudi Arabia against Ethiopians gruesome torture, rape and killing is a tragedy that could have been easily avoided.  The more shocking cases over the past seven days cruel methods, not a single Western embassy is known to have protested nor has responsible African Union or international organization expressed concern over the Ethiopians vulnerability in the hands of coward Saudi forces and their thugs. 


Democratic State versus Developmental State:
Unraveling a False Dichotomy to Promote an Adaptive Democratic Developmental State
Asghedom G/Michael, PhD    Nov. 19, 2013


Stop the Killing and Torture of Migrant Workers in Saudi Arabia
author: Mohammed Nurhussein

Saudi Arabia has an obligation to protect the migrant workers under its jurisdiction. Tell them to stop the crackdown and start working to protect immigrant workers from these appalling conditions!


Zakaria: The Saudis Are Mad? Tough! 
Why we shouldn't care that the world's most irresponsible country is displeased at the U.S.
 
By Fareed Zakaria 


Saudi Arabia continues its brutal crackdown on Ethiopian immigrants

Shocking video MILITARY beating and torturing foreigners

Shocking video: Saudi Arabia police torture Ethiopians

Secret Saudi executions shame the West 
Robert Fisk, Middle East Correspondent, reveals a frenzy of beheadings in the first of a series on women victims of Gulf 'justice'

Amid a frenzy of executions in the Arab Gulf states, at least 12 women have been put to death after Islamic trials, most of them publicly beheaded by the sword in Saudi Arabia. The majority of the executions were kept secret from all but spectators for fear of public reaction in the West, and followed unfair hearings which often denied the women a Defence lawyer. Among the more shocking cases over the past three years were a mother and her daughter who were decapitated together in front of an audience of men in a Dhahran market last August for allegedly killing the elder woman's husband. The nature of the Islamic trials and the cruel methods of execution call into question the morality of the West's military and political support for Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states whose supposedly civilised values were defended by 500,000 US, British and other Western troops after Iraq's invasion of Kuwait in 1990. Not a single Western embassy, however, is known to have protested at the beheading of women - nor at the increasingly ferocious lashing of hundreds of foreign female workers in the Gulf for alleged misdemeanors.


A another cruelty of Saudi Arabia a man waiting for Sentenced To Be Paralysed / Middle East News
Saudi Arabia owner is in the world is the most uncivilized punishments country, A man in waiting to be forcibly paralyzed in punishment for a crime which left his victim in a wheelchair , The Saudis are 

still many members of the organization, but that the world should end. When he was 14, Ali al Khawaher stabbed a friend in the spine, paralysing him from the waist down, Amnesty International said. The London-based human rights group said Mr al Khawaher, now 24, has spent 10 years in jail waiting to be paralyzed surgically unless his family pays one million Saudi riyals (£180,000) to the victim. Amnesty said the case demonstrated the need for Saudi Arabia to review its laws to “start respecting their international obligations and remove these terrible punishments from the law”. Saudi judges have in the past ordered Sharia punishments that included tooth extraction, flogging, eye gouging and – in murder cases – death.


EXPULSION OF SAUDI ARABIA FROM THE UNITED NATIONS
By Tecola W. Hagos

NB: This article was written almost ten years ago and posted in www.tecolahagos.com. It is a voice of prophecy and acute observation of the State of Saudi Arabia, Its ruling autocracy, and the characteristics of Saudis. This is a nation of abominable subhuman creatures should be completely isolated from the rest of humankind and dissolved in its own oil filth. TWH
The governments of the World community cannot simply make sanctimonious public statements and do nothing by way of taking effective action to stop the enslavement and degradation of human beings in Arab Countries cited in the Report of the State Department. There are both treaty-based principles dealing with human rights issues and customary international law principles that provide us the legal regime to demand that the World community take steps against the Saudi Government and others for their violations of human rights. 


Africans decry 'discrimination' in India 
Murder of a Nigerian in Goa turns spotlight on African community, many of whom say they face unfair treatment.
Elizabeth Soumya Last updated: 14 Nov 2013 

Ties between India and Nigeria have hit a new low in the aftermath of the recent murder of a Nigerian in the western Indian state of Goa.The killing led to angry demonstrations by other Nigerian nationals in the state, besides triggering an ugly spat between Indian politicians and Nigerian envoys in the country. Following the murder and the subsequent arson, the authorities in Goa have embarked on a drive to detect and deport Nigerians living without valid visas. The drive has angered Nigerian embassy officials in New Delhi and evoked angry response. "There are only 50,000 Nigerians living in India, but there are over a million Indians living in Nigeria.Thousands of Indians living there will be thrown out on the streets if the forcible eviction of Nigerians in Goa does not stop," Jacob Nwadibia, an administrative attaché of the Nigerian high commission in New
....


Saudi Arabia, Russia and China Elected to UNHRC
Irony: Countries with questionable human rights records win seats on none other than the UN Human Rights Council.

By Elad Benari 

In a very ironic move, a host of countries with questionable human rights records on Tuesday won seats on none other than the UN Human Rights Council. Among the countries to win seats on the council are China, Russia, Algeria, Cuba, Vietnam and Saudi Arabia which came under fire from Amnesty International over its poor human rights record as recently as last month. AFP reported that the UN General Assembly elected 14 seats on the 47-member council which is taking on increased diplomatic importance because of Syria's civil war and other conflicts. In addition to the above, France and Britain returned to the Geneva-based body. South Africa, Morocco, Namibia, Maldives, Macedonia and Mexico also secured three year terms, according to AFP.


Saudi Arabia should be expelled from the UN & Ethiopia should take Serious Diplomatic Measures

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD
IDEA Editorial November 12, 2013

The Saudis may not be held responsible for what they do to their citizens, but they should not walk away with murder when they attack and brutalize other nationals. For this apparent reason, the Ethiopian Government should file charge against Saudi Arabia for the maiming, assault, rape, and murder of Ethiopian citizens. Moreover, Ethiopia should seriously reconsider its diplomatic ties with Saudi Arabia. Any nation’s independence is tested by its performance in securing the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the nation, and by safeguarding the fundamental rights of its citizens. 
If Saudi Arabia is not going to redeem the wrongful act wrought against Ethiopians and continues to violate international norms and breach international law in relation to human rights, the United Nations should consider to expel the country and terminate its membership unless and until it honors, respects, and implements the UN Declaration on Human Rights, and this by extension should apply to all other nations that breach international law with respect to human rights.

Ethiopians are detained in Riyadh, 9 November 2013


The recent episode that was perpetuated to those poor innocent immigrants in particular Ethiopians is a sad saga that needs worldwide attention. The Saudi are no strangers to such inhuman drama using unnecessary force. The question of human rights is one of that many Arab governments has persistently evaded or ignored. For many years the security of the immigrants has been ignored. Ethiopian Observer editors call upon Amnesty International and Africa Watch the atrocity being committed by Saudi force against those defenseless immigrants. Those vast immigrants are deprived the opportunity to repatriate in timely manner.  


Thousands of Ethiopians in Riyadh seek repatriation after riot
RIYADH: Thousands of mostly African workers gathered in Riyadh on Sunday seeking repatriation after two people were killed in overnight rioting that followed a visa crackdown by Saudi authorities.
One of those killed was a Saudi, said a government statement, and the other was not identified. An Ethiopian man was killed in a visa raid last week. Ethiopia’s foreign minister condemned the deaths, and told Reuters his government was working to bring its citizens home. “This is unacceptable. We call on the Saudi government to investigate this issue seriously. We are also happy to take our citizens, who should be treated with dignity while they are there,” Foreign Affairs Minister Tedros Adhanom said. He said Addis Ababa had formally complained to Riyadh and that embassy staff were working to help Ethiopians return home.


US companies awarded 300MW PV project in Ethiopia
Three solar power stations totalling 300MW will be built and operated in Ethiopia by two US companies, Global Trade and Development Consulting (GTDC) and Energy Ventures.

The Ethiopian Ministry of Water and Energy and directors at the Ethiopian Electric Power Corporation awarded the two Maryland companies the contracts for the three photovoltaic (PV) plants, each 100MW capacity in size. The three projects in Ethiopia, located in the eastern region of the country, were site selected and due diligence performed before receiving technical and financial approval from the two Ethiopian government bodies. The thee 100MW facilities, referred to collectively as the 300MW Solar Project, will create around 2,000 construction jobs. According to Energy Ventures, the project will inject “several million dollars into the Ethiopian economy”. The company claims that ongoing operations will also contribute several hundred jobs.


Earth, wind and water: Ethiopia bids to be Africa's powerhouse
By Oliver Joy for CNN

(CNN) -- Ethiopia is turning to renewable energy technology as the East African country looks to become a powerhouse for its regional partners. Last month, Ethiopia launched one of the continent's largest wind farms in a bid to rapidly boost its generating capacity over the next three to five years. Both developments will see Ethiopia's transition into one of the regions biggest energy exporters as electric output surges from 2,000 megawatts (MW) to 10,000 MW. More than half of this is expected to come from the Renaissance Dam. And with further commitments to geothermal power and potential for oil exploration, Ethiopia's energy resources are set to be among the most diversified in Africa.


Understanding Africa's water wars
By JANET OTIENO | Wednesday, November 6


The world is replete with cases of water being used as a weapon to score either political or socio-economic goals, especially if many countries share the common resource. So, what are some of the causes of the current water wars in Africa and what are their impact on the environment? Egypt and Ethiopia are going at each other’s throat over River Nile. Ethiopia is busy constructing a controversial dam, which Egypt complains will disrupt the river’s flow, with detrimental impact on its population that is almost entirely dependent on the Nile. Addis Ababa embarked on construction of the $4.2 billion Grand Ethiopia’s Renaissance Dam (GERD) with 6,000MW electric power generation capacity in April 2011, possibly taking advantage of the Arab Spring, that distracted Cairo.  This move angered Egypt so much that at one point Cairo threatened military action against Ethiopia, though the parties later agreed to dialogue over River Nile’s governance. 


Ethiopian Airlines Receives First of Four Boeing 777-300ERs
By Jesse Sokolow on 8 November 2013

An Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 777Ethiopian Airlines announced that it took delivery of its first Boeing 777-300ER aircraft on Friday. The carrier said it will take delivery of three additional 777-300ERs in the coming months.The airline’s first 777-300ER is able to seat approximately 400 passengers in a two-class configuration. The aircraft also features Boeing Signature Interior, which offers wider seats and aisles, as well as more headroom and seating flexibility. The Boeing 777-300ER is the world’s largest long-range twin-engine jetliner. It has a range of 7,825 nautical miles (14,490 kilometers). Ethiopian Airlines serves 76 destinations across the globe. Earlier this year in August, the carrier took delivery of its first 787 Dreamliner.


Egypt and Ethiopia Disagree on Probe of Nile Dam Impact
By Ahmed Feteha & William Davison

Egypt called for international experts to help prepare a new study on the regional impact of a $4.2 billion dam in Ethiopia, which said a team made up of officials from the two nations and Sudan is 

enough.

Egypt wants “trusted international consultancies” to look into how the hydropower project on a tributary of the Nile River will affect the waterway’s flow well as safety issues, Egyptian Irrigation Minister Mohamed Abdel-Moteleb said after meeting his Sudanese and Ethiopian counterparts in Sudan’s capital, Khartoum, on Nov. 4. Ethiopian Water and Energy Minister Alemayehu Tegenu said including such a group was unnecessary after global experts completed a report earlier this year.


The Country That's Never Had an Election
Posted By Tiffany Lynch Wednesday, November 6, 2013 -


Source:.foreignpolicy.com

Eritrea, a country of roughly 6 million people on the Horn of Africa, is one of the world's most repressive states. There is no freedom of speech, press, or religion. Not a single election has been held since the country achieved independence two decades ago after a 30-year war with Ethiopia. Prolonged detention and torture are routine for any dissenters. And adults are forcibly conscripted mandatory military or national service that can last as long as the government decides. 
Yet despite Eritrea's ghastly human rights record, few human rights activists, policy makers, or world leaders ever mention the place.  Here are ten reasons why we should care about the state of human rights in this oft-forgotten corner of the world: 


Ethiopia among Lonely Planet’s 10 best value travel destinations for 2014
Ethiopia has been named as one of the 10 best value travel destinations for 2014 by Lonely Planet, the largest travel guide book publisher in the world. Ethiopia is 'one slice of Africa that rewards the curious as well as the deep-pocketed', writes the publication. Tourists can see a huge amount of its highlights by taking great-value and time-saving flights along the country’s Historic Route. This astonishing journey includes the Lake Tana monasteries and the Blue Nile Falls, the rock-hewn wonders of Lalibela and much more, writes Lonely Planet.


Ethiopia opens Africa's largest wind farm to boost power production
(Reuters) - Africa's biggest wind farm began production in Ethiopia on Saturday, aiding efforts to diversify electricity generation from hydropower plants and help the country become a major regional exporter of energy. The Horn of Africa country - plagued by frequent blackouts - plans to boost generating capacity from 2,000 MW to 10,000 MW within the next three to five years, much of it coming from the 6,000 MW Grand Renaissance Dam under construction on the Nile.


Real wildcatters go to Ethiopia to hunt for oil
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia, Oct. 25 (UPI) -- Amid East Africa's oil and gas boom, the more adventurous oilmen are starting to gravitate toward the vast Ogaden desert region of Ethiopia, where drilling activity has been sparse since rebels attacked an exploration team in 2007, killing nine Chinese and 65 Ethiopians. Initial estimates are that Ethiopia has oil reserves of around 2.7 billion barrels. That's a modest enough total in global terms, but it's a potential bonanza for an impoverished state like Ethiopia, which has been land-locked since Eritrea broke away to form an independent state on the Red Sea in 1991 after a 30-year separatist war.


Dear Professor Ghelawdewos, I just read your review of the fascinating book Tower in the Sky by Hiwot Teffera. Incidentally, I came across it right after I finished reading the book, which I acquired a few days ago. As many were happy to see those brilliant young boys after years of absence just a few days earlier, this unexpected cruel act shocked the entire town. I always remember them, as they used to come to play football to our place in the good days preceding the red terror. They could really play football. Having heard of 'mercy' offered by the regime, I was then hopeful to see them in the university soon as they were some of the outstanding students of the time. I hoped, they would one day free their parents from destitution. It was all nightmare. I have no idea what thereafter happened to their parents, whose hopes had been dashed cruelly and forever.


Ethiopia opens Africa's largest wind farm to boost power production
(Reuters) - Africa's biggest wind farm began production in Ethiopia on Saturday, aiding efforts to diversify electricity generation from hydropower plants and help the country become a major regional exporter of energy. The Horn of Africa country - plagued by frequent blackouts - plans to boost generating capacity from 2,000 MW to 10,000 MW within the next three to five years, much of it coming from the 6,000 MW Grand Renaissance Dam under construction on the Nile.


East Africa’s 5 dollar billionaires and 55 million poor people
By PAUL REDFERN and JEFF OTIENO | Sunday, October 13 

Economists said the widening of the income inequality gap has become the Achilles’ heel of the region’s ambitious growth projects as wealth continued to be concentrated among the rich.
The numbers of people living in absolute poverty — less than $1.25 a day — across East Africa remains high, with Burundi and Tanzania having the highest percentage (at over 81 and 67 per cent respectively) and Ethiopia and Uganda (at 30 and 38 per cent respectively), the lowest in the region, according to the World Bank statistics compiled between 2005 and 2012.


Ethiopia signs US$4b geothermal deal
Source: AFP

Ethiopia signed a US$4 billion deal Wednesday with American-Icelandic company Reykjavik Geothermal to develop a 1000-megawatt geothermal farm, officials said.
ADDIS ABABA: Ethiopia signed a US$4 billion deal Wednesday with American-Icelandic company Reykjavik Geothermal to develop a 1000-megawatt geothermal farm, officials said.
When completed, the project to provide energy for both local consumption and export will be the largest source of foreign direct investment in Ethiopia.


Ethiopia bans citizens from traveling abroad for work
Source: BBC

Ethiopia's government has temporarily banned its citizens from traveling abroad to look for work, the state-run Erta news agency reports. The foreign ministry was quoted as saying countless Ethiopians had lost their lives or undergone untold physical and psychological trauma because of illegal human trafficking. The decision was meant to "safeguard the well-being of citizens", it added.
The travel ban will remain in place until a "lasting solution" is found. The ministry said the government had taken various measures to limit the suffering of its citizens, including setting up a national council and a taskforce to educate them.


Reposted for the 75th Anniversary of Italy's Fascist Crimes in Ethiopia.

Revisiting Fascist Italy's Crime in Ethiopia

Ghelawdewos Araia

This essay will make a brief historical synopsis and analysis of the crimes perpetrated by the Italian fascists against the Ethiopian people in the 1930s. At this particular juncture, it may sound ironic to revisit the crimes against humanity committed in Ethiopia by Fascist henchmen like Marshall Pietro Badoglio and Marshal Rodolfo Graziani, but sometimes the past contends with the present especially if justice has not been served and no official apologies extended by state and/or religious leaders of the perpetrator nation.This essay is also aimed at reinforcing the Global Alliance for Ethiopia, a group of Ethiopians’ initiative in an effort to convince the Vatican and Pope Benedict XVI to apologize to Ethiopians as he has done to the Jews in Germany with respect to the Holocaust committed by the Nazis. As a matter of fact, one of the members of the Global Alliance for Ethiopia, Ato Kidane Alemayehu has written a letter to the Holiness Pope Benedict XVI (Vatican_Apology_to_Ethiopia.doc) but to this day no answer was given.


Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan Mull New Probe Nile Dam Impact
By William Davison

Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt agreed to examine the regional impact of a $4.2 billion dam being built on a Nile river tributary in Ethiopia after experts said earlier studies were inconclusive.
A meeting of water ministers and delegates in Sudan’s capital, Khartoum, on Nov. 4 will discuss conducting a new study of the hydropower project’s downstream effect and more detailed appraisals of its environmental and social impact, said Fekahmed Negash, head of the Ethiopian Water Ministry’s Boundary and Transboundary Rivers Affairs Directorate.


Eritrea teetering on the brink 
By Chamara Sumanapala 

With a coastline of 600 miles, Eritrea occupies an important place in the Red Sea. It even takes its name from the Latin term for Red Sea, Mare Erythraeum. After a three decade long war of independence with Ethiopia, Eritrea overwhelmingly voted for independence in April, 1993. After just over 20 years, some analysts fear that Eritrea is on the verge of collapse. Eritrea is a nation of six million people belonging to nine officially recognized ethnic groups. Roughly half the population is Sunni Muslim and the other half belongs to several Christian denominations. 


Ethiopia unveils telescope in first phase of space programme
Source: AFP

Addis Ababa — Ethiopia unveiled Friday the first phase of a space exploration programme, which includes East Africa's largest observatory designed to promote astronomy research in the region.
"The optical astronomical telescope is mainly intended for astronomy and astrophysics observation research," said observatory director Solomon Belay.
The observatory, which will formally be opened on Saturday, boasts two telescopes, each one metre (over three feet) wide, to see "extra planets, different types of stars, the Milky Way, and deep galaxies," Solomon added.


Ethiopia Gears Up To Emulate China, Vietnam And South Korea In Factory Output
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia -- From the outside, the China-Africa Overseas Leather Products tannery looks eerily idle. Long white buildings with blue-tinted windows surround a nearly empty parking lot, and the facility is so quiet you can hear the fluttering of the Chinese and Ethiopian flags out front.
But inside the gate and down past the office buildings -- where many of the Chinese employees work and live -- is a collection of massive workshops, and there you can hear the whirr of machinery as animal hides are soaked, threshed, tanned, shaved, colored and finished. About 450 Ethiopian workers are there to move things along.


Ethiopia, Egypt Set to Start Talks Over $4.3 Bln Dam Row
October 16, 2013 at 9:23am

*Addis Ababa, which is fully funding the project, has pledged to sell excess power to Egypt.
By Nicholas Bariyo, WSJ.com
Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan will hold discussions next week over the impact of a new $4.3 billion hydro power plant along the river Nile, which Egypt fears will hurt water supply to its 84 million people. "The meeting is scheduled to take place...on Oct. 22, 2013 between officials of the three countries," the Ethiopian foreign ministry said in a statement. The meeting will be the first since experts submitted their recommendations on the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam project more than three months ago. Egypt fears the 6,000 megawatt plant is likely to hurt its water supply when it comes on-stream around 2017. Majority of the Egyptian population is centered near the Nile valley and the desert nation depends on the river for around 95% of its water.


Tower In The Sky 
Authored by Hiwot Teffera 

Addis Ababa University Press, 2012 
Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD 
October 17, 2013 

Tower In The Sky wholly and thoroughly examines the struggles of the EPRP in a very lucid and cogent way, but not only in terms of narrating the complex Ethiopian politics of the time and praising the fallen heroes in due course of the struggle, but also in criticizing the shortcomings and failures of the Party. Hiwot Teffera eloquently captures in a dramatic fashion EPRP’s clandestine operations from the outburst of the Ethiopian Revolution in 1974 to her incarceration and her release in 1986. 


Is the Horn of Africa facing another collapsing state?
AljazeeraAljazeera – Tue, Oct 15, 2013..

Is the Horn of Africa facing another collapsing state?
Is the Horn of Africa facing another collapsing state?Is the Horn of Africa facing another collapsing state?
Just as the Horn of Africa is witnessing the slow restoration of one collapsed state - after more than two decades of anarchic conditions in Somalia - it may be facing the collapse of another.
The small country of Eritrea, only 20 years after gaining independence from Ethiopia, has emerged as one of the largest sources of refugees in Africa - as well as one of the most militarised societies in the world. It is increasingly displaying signs of withering state structures and an unsustainable humanitarian situation. The Eritrean state has, since a 1998 border war with Ethiopia, been caught in a negative spiral of autocracy and deteriorating conditions. President Isaias Afewerki - the only leader this young nation has known - used the threat posed by Ethiopia as a pretext to eliminate all domestic opposition and indefinitely defer implementing the constitution and holding elections.


The International Criminal Court and African Leaders’ Concern 
IDEA Editorial

October 11, 2013
The precursor to the International Criminal Court (ICC) is the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 that was called upon by the Commission of Responsibilities. The Paris Conference initiative to establish an international tribunal, however, did not gain currency until the League of Nations addressed the issue again on November 1937, in which only thirteen countries signed but the idea of finding a permanent international tribunal was not ratified. Nevertheless, the idea persisted and this time it was precipitated by the Nuremberg Trials and the Tokyo Tribunals presided over by the Allied Forces following WWII. By 1950, the UN General Assembly was poised to establish an international tribunal, but this initiative too was circumvented by the Cold War. 


African Union summit opens with attack on ICC
By ANDUALEM SISAY in Addis Ababa | Friday, October 11

Ethiopia’s Foreign Affairs minister Tedros Adhanom has condemned the manner of trial of Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta and his Deputy William Ruto by International Criminal Court (ICC).
Mr Tedros said the demand for the two to attend all the court proceedings at The Hague was a threat against Kenya’s sovereignty. “ICC’s decision does not only undermine the ability of the Kenyan leaders in the discharge of their constitutional responsibilities, but also poses significant threats against the country's sovereignty,” said Mr Tedros, in his address to the African ministers gathered in Addis Ababa Friday.


Special Report: The Darfur conflict's deadly gold rush
By Ulf Laessing

KHARTOUM | Tue Oct 8, 2013 8:17am EDT 
(Reuters) - With its scrubland, unpaved roads and mud brick huts, the Jebel Amer area in Darfur, western Sudan, can look like a poor and desolate place. Under the ground, though, lies something sought by people everywhere: gold. In the past year or so the precious metal has begun to alter the nature of the decade-old conflict in Darfur, transforming it from an ethnic and political fight to one that, at least in part, is over precious metal. Fighting between rival tribes over the Jebel Amer gold mine that stretches for some 10 km (six miles) beneath the sandy hills of North Darfur has killed more than 800 people and displaced some 150,000 others since January. Arab tribes, once heavily armed by the government to suppress insurgents, have turned their guns on each other to get their hands on the mines. Rebel groups that oppose the government also want the metal.


Ethiopian premier says Hague court has 'double standards'
By Aaron Maasho and Edmund Blair

ADDIS ABABA | Thu Oct 10, 2013 3:19pm EDT 
(Reuters) - The International Criminal Court has shown "double standards" by pursuing only Africans so far and should defer trials of Kenya's leaders or take other steps so they can fulfill their elected offices, Ethiopia's prime minister said on Thursday. Hailemariam Desalegn was speaking before an African Union summit in Addis Ababa that will discuss relations with the court which has convicted only one man, an African warlord. The only others charged are also Africans.


Paris-based radio broke shipwreck news to Eritreans
By AFP | Thursday, October 10 2013

When tragedy struck off Italy's coast last week, it was a Paris-based radio station that broke the news to Eritrea, home to a majority of the 300-plus men, women and children feared dead in the shipwreck. State media in the tiny Horn of Africa nation made no mention of the Eritrean nationals who perished last Thursday near the southern island of Lampedusa. Their boat caught fire in the worst recent migrant disaster in the Mediterranean. That came as no surprise from a country where former rebel leader turned president Issaias Afeworki has ruled with an iron fist for two decades, prompting a steady exodus of refugees. The country ranked last below North Korea in a global survey on press freedom by media watchdog Reporters Without Borders (RSF). According to the United Nations, about 3,000 people flee Eritrea every month.But for staffers at Radio Erena, an independent radio station set up in 2009 with backing from RSF, covering the tragedy was "almost a personal mission," said its chief Biniam Simon.


Over 1 million Ethiopians 'graduate' from poverty 
By ANDUALEM SISAY in Addis Ababa | Wednesday, October 9

Over one million Ethiopians were lifted out of poverty within a year from July 2012 to end of June 2013 fiscal year, said the government. The development, explained the State Minister of Finance and Economic Development, Dr Abraham Tekestea, was due to the 9.7 per cent economic growth the country registered last year. The minister was briefing the media in his office Wednesday about Ethiopia's economic performance during the last fiscal year ended July, 7, 2013. “As a result of the 9.7 per cent GDP growth rate we registered last year, we are able to lift over one million people out of poverty,” he said. “Our growth is broad-based and the GDP growth we registered last year is above the minimum requirement to halve poverty as indicated in the Millennium Development Goals. It is also above the sub-Saharan GDP growth,” added the minister. He disclosed that currently, Ethiopia's GDP per capita had reached $550 from $510 last year, while the country’s GDP was $47 billion.


  Political Socialization in the era of Globalization in Ethiopian Schools

Desta, Asayehgn, Ph. D. Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development 
Abstract:

In contrast to other socialization agencies such as the family, peer groups, religious institutions and the tribal elders, and mass media, there is no doubt that schooling commands nearly undivided attention of students for long hours over many years and remains the most controllable channel for important cognitive and affective political socialization. During Haile Selassie’s regime (1930-1974) in Ethiopia, in addition to regarding education as one of the major players for training and the development of human resources essential for economic growth, the overarching goal of public schooling has been to build national pride, a strong common national identity dominated by one ethnic group, obedience to rules and laws, and the development of respect espousing legitimacy for government and the political institution.  In keeping with the socialist slogan pursued by the Military Junta from 1974-1991, Ethiopian schools, under the threat of the gun, were assigned to instill Ethiopian nationalism in order to create socialistic-minded Ethiopians under their authoritarian, military rule.  Galvanized by the mass terror in Ethiopia under the leadership of the Derg, eventually, the various ethnic groups, preserved through decades of cultural persecution, economic,....


Mayor Mike McGinn at Tigrai Community Fundraising event         

By Ethiopian Observer editor Bereket Kiros                                        

An amazing gala and a colorful fundraising for Tigrai Community event that depicts Ethiopian diversity was concluded yesterday with the presence of City of Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn along with his wife Peg Lynch, Deputy Mayor of Community Darryl Smith, the Honorable Ambassador Zerihun Retta Counsul General of Ethiopia at Los Angeles, and other high ranking officials from City of Seattle. As he ushered to the podium accompanied by community representative for the event Abel Girmay and Tigrai community chairman Addisu Bahta the audience was electrifying with standing ovation.  Indeed Mayor Mike McGinn is a true defender and advocate of immigrant and refugee communities in Seattle. 

Video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iHIXrUDb9w&feature=youtu.be


Viewers Open Wallets After 'World News' Report on $11 Cure That Lets Some Blind See
Erin McLaughlin More from Erin »Oct. 3, 2013 

An American doctor has been overwhelmed with donations from viewers who want to give the gift of sight to the millions in the developing world who live in darkness, after ABC's "World News" reported Wednesday on the doctor's efforts in Africa.  In fact, $139,186 was donated in the first 24 hours after ABC News' report, according to the Himalayan Cataract Project, enough to buy 12,653 lenses for patients with cataract blindness. "Thank you so much to all the viewers. Your donations mean thousands more surgeries will now be possible," said Job Heintz, of the Himalayan Cataract Project. "Patients will receive sight restoring surgery thanks to your story." 


Ethiopia: More Arrests in High Profile Corruption Case
By Elleni Araya, 29 September 2013 

Gebreselassie Hailemariam, a.k.a Aleqa Gebreselassie - owner of the COMET Building in the Hayahulet Mazoria area in Bole District, and father of Yemane Gebreselassie, who owns the new Capital Hotel & Spa on Haile Gebreselassie Avenue- was arrested three weeks ago, in connection with the current high profile corruption crackdown on the tax sector by the Federal Ethics & Anti Corruption Commission (FEACC). He has already been indicted and has joined other high profile officials in prison, Fortune confirmed from investigators. He joins the ranks of other high profile businessmen arrested over the last four months. It started with Nega Gebregziabehere, shareholder in Netsa Trading Plc; Simachew Kebede, part-owner of the Intercontinental Hotel, and Ketema Kebede, shareholder in K.K Plc, all of whom were arrested in May.


Battling brain drain: Training doctors in Ethiopia

Battling brain drain: Training doctors in EthiopiaSenait Fisseha leads a new initiative to train Ethiopian doctors. Credit: William Foreman
Brain drain is so severe in Ethiopia that the nation's health minister has complained there are more Ethiopian doctors in Chicago than in his own country. The good news is that the East African nation has one of the world's fastest-growing economies and is recovering from the nightmare decades of civil war and famine. Tackling the health care crisis is high on the priority list of the government, which has opened 13 new medical schools in the last two years. But training the doctors is still a huge challenge. One physician who is playing a key role in Ethiopia's bold medical initiative is Senait Fisseha, an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Michigan. She's leading a U-M effort to develop a postgraduate training program for doctors of obstetrics and gynecology that is fast-becoming a national model for Ethiopia.


Ethiopia: 2015 Diversity Visa Program Registration

September 30, 2013 – The U.S. Embassy in Addis Ababa is please to share, below, the Department of State announcement for the 2015 Diversity Visa Program (DV-2015). Ethiopia is an eligible country for DV-2015. DV-2015 applicants must submit entries online to the website address below. There is no charge for applications. Persons or entities that represent themselves as authorized agents of the U.S. Government and that charge a fee to submit applications or provide other services are fraudulent.


Eritrea: Dozens of Eritrean Mutineers Killed Says Army Deserter
30 September 2013 

Shire — An Eritrean soldier who recently fled to Ethiopia has alleged that many of the dissident soldiers who in January laid siege at the ministry of information building in the capital Asmara have been killed. Over 100 Eritrean dissident soldiers on January 21, 2013 stormed and took control of the ministry of information in Asmara and called for political reform and a return to the country's 1997 constitution. The day-long mutiny ended after Special Forces loyal to President Isaias Afeorki surrounded the building and the mutineers agreed to release hostages and to peacefully return to their base. The Eritrean army deserter who refused to be named for fear of reprisal against his relatives back in Asmera, said most of the mutineers were arrested days after their failed mutineer.


Water Wars: Egyptians Condemn Ethiopia's Nile Dam Project
As the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam takes shape, tempers rise.

Peter Schwartzstein in Cairo
National Geographic

Aerial photograph of the Blue Nile river in Northern Ethiopia."Ethiopia is killing us," taxi driver Ahmed Hossam said, as he picked his way through Cairo's notoriously traffic-clogged streets. "If they build this dam, there will be no Nile. If there's no Nile, then there's no Egypt." Projects on the scale of the $4.7 billion, 1.1-mile-long (1.7-kilometer-long) Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam often encounter impassioned resistance, but few inspire the kind of dread and fury with which most Egyptians regard plans to dam the Blue Nile River.The dam is now 20 percent built, and on schedule to be completed by 2017, according to Ethiopian officials. The Grand Renaissance Dam, it seems, is going to get built. But what happens next depends on how Egypt adjusts to its changed circumstances.
"Egypt needs to wake up to the new world," Verhoeven said. "This doesn't need to be a problem."

 

 

Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan Mull New Probe Nile Dam Impact
By William Davison

Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt agreed to examine the regional impact of a $4.2 billion dam being built on a Nile river tributary in Ethiopia after experts said earlier studies were inconclusive.
A meeting of water ministers and delegates in Sudan’s capital, Khartoum, on Nov. 4 will discuss conducting a new study of the hydropower project’s downstream effect and more detailed appraisals of its environmental and social impact, said Fekahmed Negash, head of the Ethiopian Water Ministry’s Boundary and Transboundary Rivers Affairs Directorate.


Eritrea teetering on the brink 
By Chamara Sumanapala 

With a coastline of 600 miles, Eritrea occupies an important place in the Red Sea. It even takes its name from the Latin term for Red Sea, Mare Erythraeum. After a three decade long war of independence with Ethiopia, Eritrea overwhelmingly voted for independence in April, 1993. After just over 20 years, some analysts fear that Eritrea is on the verge of collapse. Eritrea is a nation of six million people belonging to nine officially recognized ethnic groups. Roughly half the population is Sunni Muslim and the other half belongs to several Christian denominations. 


Ethiopia unveils telescope in first phase of space programme
Source: AFP

Addis Ababa — Ethiopia unveiled Friday the first phase of a space exploration programme, which includes East Africa's largest observatory designed to promote astronomy research in the region.
"The optical astronomical telescope is mainly intended for astronomy and astrophysics observation research," said observatory director Solomon Belay.
The observatory, which will formally be opened on Saturday, boasts two telescopes, each one metre (over three feet) wide, to see "extra planets, different types of stars, the Milky Way, and deep galaxies," Solomon added.


Ethiopia Gears Up To Emulate China, Vietnam And South Korea In Factory Output
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia -- From the outside, the China-Africa Overseas Leather Products tannery looks eerily idle. Long white buildings with blue-tinted windows surround a nearly empty parking lot, and the facility is so quiet you can hear the fluttering of the Chinese and Ethiopian flags out front.
But inside the gate and down past the office buildings -- where many of the Chinese employees work and live -- is a collection of massive workshops, and there you can hear the whirr of machinery as animal hides are soaked, threshed, tanned, shaved, colored and finished. About 450 Ethiopian workers are there to move things along.


Ethiopia, Egypt Set to Start Talks Over $4.3 Bln Dam Row
October 16, 2013 at 9:23am

*Addis Ababa, which is fully funding the project, has pledged to sell excess power to Egypt.
By Nicholas Bariyo, WSJ.com
Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan will hold discussions next week over the impact of a new $4.3 billion hydro power plant along the river Nile, which Egypt fears will hurt water supply to its 84 million people. "The meeting is scheduled to take place...on Oct. 22, 2013 between officials of the three countries," the Ethiopian foreign ministry said in a statement. The meeting will be the first since experts submitted their recommendations on the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam project more than three months ago. Egypt fears the 6,000 megawatt plant is likely to hurt its water supply when it comes on-stream around 2017. Majority of the Egyptian population is centered near the Nile valley and the desert nation depends on the river for around 95% of its water.


Tower In The Sky 
Authored by Hiwot Teffera 

Addis Ababa University Press, 2012 
Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD 
October 17, 2013 

Tower In The Sky wholly and thoroughly examines the struggles of the EPRP in a very lucid and cogent way, but not only in terms of narrating the complex Ethiopian politics of the time and praising the fallen heroes in due course of the struggle, but also in criticizing the shortcomings and failures of the Party. Hiwot Teffera eloquently captures in a dramatic fashion EPRP’s clandestine operations from the outburst of the Ethiopian Revolution in 1974 to her incarceration and her release in 1986. 


Is the Horn of Africa facing another collapsing state?
AljazeeraAljazeera – Tue, Oct 15, 2013..

Is the Horn of Africa facing another collapsing state?
Is the Horn of Africa facing another collapsing state?Is the Horn of Africa facing another collapsing state?
Just as the Horn of Africa is witnessing the slow restoration of one collapsed state - after more than two decades of anarchic conditions in Somalia - it may be facing the collapse of another.
The small country of Eritrea, only 20 years after gaining independence from Ethiopia, has emerged as one of the largest sources of refugees in Africa - as well as one of the most militarised societies in the world. It is increasingly displaying signs of withering state structures and an unsustainable humanitarian situation. The Eritrean state has, since a 1998 border war with Ethiopia, been caught in a negative spiral of autocracy and deteriorating conditions. President Isaias Afewerki - the only leader this young nation has known - used the threat posed by Ethiopia as a pretext to eliminate all domestic opposition and indefinitely defer implementing the constitution and holding elections.


The International Criminal Court and African Leaders’ Concern 
IDEA Editorial

October 11, 2013
The precursor to the International Criminal Court (ICC) is the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 that was called upon by the Commission of Responsibilities. The Paris Conference initiative to establish an international tribunal, however, did not gain currency until the League of Nations addressed the issue again on November 1937, in which only thirteen countries signed but the idea of finding a permanent international tribunal was not ratified. Nevertheless, the idea persisted and this time it was precipitated by the Nuremberg Trials and the Tokyo Tribunals presided over by the Allied Forces following WWII. By 1950, the UN General Assembly was poised to establish an international tribunal, but this initiative too was circumvented by the Cold War. 


African Union summit opens with attack on ICC
By ANDUALEM SISAY in Addis Ababa | Friday, October 11

Ethiopia’s Foreign Affairs minister Tedros Adhanom has condemned the manner of trial of Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta and his Deputy William Ruto by International Criminal Court (ICC).
Mr Tedros said the demand for the two to attend all the court proceedings at The Hague was a threat against Kenya’s sovereignty. “ICC’s decision does not only undermine the ability of the Kenyan leaders in the discharge of their constitutional responsibilities, but also poses significant threats against the country's sovereignty,” said Mr Tedros, in his address to the African ministers gathered in Addis Ababa Friday.


Special Report: The Darfur conflict's deadly gold rush
By Ulf Laessing

KHARTOUM | Tue Oct 8, 2013 8:17am EDT 
(Reuters) - With its scrubland, unpaved roads and mud brick huts, the Jebel Amer area in Darfur, western Sudan, can look like a poor and desolate place. Under the ground, though, lies something sought by people everywhere: gold. In the past year or so the precious metal has begun to alter the nature of the decade-old conflict in Darfur, transforming it from an ethnic and political fight to one that, at least in part, is over precious metal. Fighting between rival tribes over the Jebel Amer gold mine that stretches for some 10 km (six miles) beneath the sandy hills of North Darfur has killed more than 800 people and displaced some 150,000 others since January. Arab tribes, once heavily armed by the government to suppress insurgents, have turned their guns on each other to get their hands on the mines. Rebel groups that oppose the government also want the metal.


Ethiopian premier says Hague court has 'double standards'
By Aaron Maasho and Edmund Blair

ADDIS ABABA | Thu Oct 10, 2013 3:19pm EDT 
(Reuters) - The International Criminal Court has shown "double standards" by pursuing only Africans so far and should defer trials of Kenya's leaders or take other steps so they can fulfill their elected offices, Ethiopia's prime minister said on Thursday. Hailemariam Desalegn was speaking before an African Union summit in Addis Ababa that will discuss relations with the court which has convicted only one man, an African warlord. The only others charged are also Africans.


Paris-based radio broke shipwreck news to Eritreans
By AFP | Thursday, October 10 2013

When tragedy struck off Italy's coast last week, it was a Paris-based radio station that broke the news to Eritrea, home to a majority of the 300-plus men, women and children feared dead in the shipwreck. State media in the tiny Horn of Africa nation made no mention of the Eritrean nationals who perished last Thursday near the southern island of Lampedusa. Their boat caught fire in the worst recent migrant disaster in the Mediterranean. That came as no surprise from a country where former rebel leader turned president Issaias Afeworki has ruled with an iron fist for two decades, prompting a steady exodus of refugees. The country ranked last below North Korea in a global survey on press freedom by media watchdog Reporters Without Borders (RSF). According to the United Nations, about 3,000 people flee Eritrea every month.But for staffers at Radio Erena, an independent radio station set up in 2009 with backing from RSF, covering the tragedy was "almost a personal mission," said its chief Biniam Simon.


Over 1 million Ethiopians 'graduate' from poverty 
By ANDUALEM SISAY in Addis Ababa | Wednesday, October 9

Over one million Ethiopians were lifted out of poverty within a year from July 2012 to end of June 2013 fiscal year, said the government. The development, explained the State Minister of Finance and Economic Development, Dr Abraham Tekestea, was due to the 9.7 per cent economic growth the country registered last year. The minister was briefing the media in his office Wednesday about Ethiopia's economic performance during the last fiscal year ended July, 7, 2013. “As a result of the 9.7 per cent GDP growth rate we registered last year, we are able to lift over one million people out of poverty,” he said. “Our growth is broad-based and the GDP growth we registered last year is above the minimum requirement to halve poverty as indicated in the Millennium Development Goals. It is also above the sub-Saharan GDP growth,” added the minister. He disclosed that currently, Ethiopia's GDP per capita had reached $550 from $510 last year, while the country’s GDP was $47 billion.


  Political Socialization in the era of Globalization in Ethiopian Schools

Desta, Asayehgn, Ph. D. Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development 
Abstract:

In contrast to other socialization agencies such as the family, peer groups, religious institutions and the tribal elders, and mass media, there is no doubt that schooling commands nearly undivided attention of students for long hours over many years and remains the most controllable channel for important cognitive and affective political socialization. During Haile Selassie’s regime (1930-1974) in Ethiopia, in addition to regarding education as one of the major players for training and the development of human resources essential for economic growth, the overarching goal of public schooling has been to build national pride, a strong common national identity dominated by one ethnic group, obedience to rules and laws, and the development of respect espousing legitimacy for government and the political institution.  In keeping with the socialist slogan pursued by the Military Junta from 1974-1991, Ethiopian schools, under the threat of the gun, were assigned to instill Ethiopian nationalism in order to create socialistic-minded Ethiopians under their authoritarian, military rule.  Galvanized by the mass terror in Ethiopia under the leadership of the Derg, eventually, the various ethnic groups, preserved through decades of cultural persecution, economic,....


Mayor Mike McGinn at Tigrai Community Fundraising event         

By Ethiopian Observer editor Bereket Kiros                                        

An amazing gala and a colorful fundraising for Tigrai Community event that depicts Ethiopian diversity was concluded yesterday with the presence of City of Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn along with his wife Peg Lynch, Deputy Mayor of Community Darryl Smith, the Honorable Ambassador Zerihun Retta Counsul General of Ethiopia at Los Angeles, and other high ranking officials from City of Seattle. As he ushered to the podium accompanied by community representative for the event Abel Girmay and Tigrai community chairman Addisu Bahta the audience was electrifying with standing ovation.  Indeed Mayor Mike McGinn is a true defender and advocate of immigrant and refugee communities in Seattle. 

Video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iHIXrUDb9w&feature=youtu.be


Viewers Open Wallets After 'World News' Report on $11 Cure That Lets Some Blind See
Erin McLaughlin More from Erin »Oct. 3, 2013 

An American doctor has been overwhelmed with donations from viewers who want to give the gift of sight to the millions in the developing world who live in darkness, after ABC's "World News" reported Wednesday on the doctor's efforts in Africa.  In fact, $139,186 was donated in the first 24 hours after ABC News' report, according to the Himalayan Cataract Project, enough to buy 12,653 lenses for patients with cataract blindness. "Thank you so much to all the viewers. Your donations mean thousands more surgeries will now be possible," said Job Heintz, of the Himalayan Cataract Project. "Patients will receive sight restoring surgery thanks to your story." 


Ethiopia: More Arrests in High Profile Corruption Case
By Elleni Araya, 29 September 2013 

Gebreselassie Hailemariam, a.k.a Aleqa Gebreselassie - owner of the COMET Building in the Hayahulet Mazoria area in Bole District, and father of Yemane Gebreselassie, who owns the new Capital Hotel & Spa on Haile Gebreselassie Avenue- was arrested three weeks ago, in connection with the current high profile corruption crackdown on the tax sector by the Federal Ethics & Anti Corruption Commission (FEACC). He has already been indicted and has joined other high profile officials in prison, Fortune confirmed from investigators. He joins the ranks of other high profile businessmen arrested over the last four months. It started with Nega Gebregziabehere, shareholder in Netsa Trading Plc; Simachew Kebede, part-owner of the Intercontinental Hotel, and Ketema Kebede, shareholder in K.K Plc, all of whom were arrested in May.


Battling brain drain: Training doctors in Ethiopia

Battling brain drain: Training doctors in EthiopiaSenait Fisseha leads a new initiative to train Ethiopian doctors. Credit: William Foreman
Brain drain is so severe in Ethiopia that the nation's health minister has complained there are more Ethiopian doctors in Chicago than in his own country. The good news is that the East African nation has one of the world's fastest-growing economies and is recovering from the nightmare decades of civil war and famine. Tackling the health care crisis is high on the priority list of the government, which has opened 13 new medical schools in the last two years. But training the doctors is still a huge challenge. One physician who is playing a key role in Ethiopia's bold medical initiative is Senait Fisseha, an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Michigan. She's leading a U-M effort to develop a postgraduate training program for doctors of obstetrics and gynecology that is fast-becoming a national model for Ethiopia.


Ethiopia: 2015 Diversity Visa Program Registration

September 30, 2013 – The U.S. Embassy in Addis Ababa is please to share, below, the Department of State announcement for the 2015 Diversity Visa Program (DV-2015). Ethiopia is an eligible country for DV-2015. DV-2015 applicants must submit entries online to the website address below. There is no charge for applications. Persons or entities that represent themselves as authorized agents of the U.S. Government and that charge a fee to submit applications or provide other services are fraudulent.


Eritrea: Dozens of Eritrean Mutineers Killed Says Army Deserter
30 September 2013 

Shire — An Eritrean soldier who recently fled to Ethiopia has alleged that many of the dissident soldiers who in January laid siege at the ministry of information building in the capital Asmara have been killed. Over 100 Eritrean dissident soldiers on January 21, 2013 stormed and took control of the ministry of information in Asmara and called for political reform and a return to the country's 1997 constitution. The day-long mutiny ended after Special Forces loyal to President Isaias Afeorki surrounded the building and the mutineers agreed to release hostages and to peacefully return to their base. The Eritrean army deserter who refused to be named for fear of reprisal against his relatives back in Asmera, said most of the mutineers were arrested days after their failed mutineer.


Water Wars: Egyptians Condemn Ethiopia's Nile Dam Project
As the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam takes shape, tempers rise.

Peter Schwartzstein in Cairo
National Geographic

Aerial photograph of the Blue Nile river in Northern Ethiopia."Ethiopia is killing us," taxi driver Ahmed Hossam said, as he picked his way through Cairo's notoriously traffic-clogged streets. "If they build this dam, there will be no Nile. If there's no Nile, then there's no Egypt." Projects on the scale of the $4.7 billion, 1.1-mile-long (1.7-kilometer-long) Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam often encounter impassioned resistance, but few inspire the kind of dread and fury with which most Egyptians regard plans to dam the Blue Nile River.The dam is now 20 percent built, and on schedule to be completed by 2017, according to Ethiopian officials. The Grand Renaissance Dam, it seems, is going to get built. But what happens next depends on how Egypt adjusts to its changed circumstances.
"Egypt needs to wake up to the new world," Verhoeven said. "This doesn't need to be a problem."


ETHIOPIA: Democracy, Devolution of Power, & The Developmental State
Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA) 2013
Authored by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

Reviewed by Tariku Debretsion
Review first published on Amazon September 21, 2013

This book is an essential reading for all who are interested to study and act on the transformation of the Ethiopian state. For far too long, the policies and actions of the elites in power have been directed by existential instinct to cling to power indefinitely, while the oppositions were primarily concerned as to how to ascend to power in the shortest possible time. These have been the linchpins of the vicious cycle of violence that has dragged the nation into the abbeys of misery. The essential question is power for whom and what? Flowery manifestos have been written, ideologies hailed, revolution heralded, savage wars fought and victories declared, yet a modicum of change has occurred in the hapless lives of the people, the bureaucratic institutions and economic edifices.


NILE: SUDANESE SCHOLAR BACKS ETHIOPIAN DAM
September 27th, 2013
 

In a rare defiance of Egyptian pressure, to which Sudanese scholars acquiesced to for decades, a renowned legal scholar wrote an op-ed endorsing Grand Ethiopian Renaissance dam and the Nile Basin Cooperative Framework Agreement(a.k.a. CFA or the Entebbe Agreement).
Dr. Salman Mohamed Ahmed Salman elaborated the benefits of the dam at length and also emphatically noted that: "Cooperation and negotiation with Ethiopia and the other states of the Nile Basin in good faith and sincerity on the rights of those states in the framework of Entebbe Agreement constitute the sole guarantee for maximum utilization of Basin water


Africans Live On A Continent Owned by Europeans!
By: Mawuna Remarque KOUTONIN

The Dream of Europeans is to transform the whole continent into South Africa or Kenya, where a white minority owns and controls the local economy, while Africans are just good like consumers or their servants. The subject is uncomfortable but we need to talk about it, otherwise we will wake up with more Robert Mugabe who is doing a great job redressing centuries of white minority domination and exploitation of Zimbabwean people. In South Africa 64% of top senior management positions are filled by whites. 90% of the board of the Central Bank is made of the white minority. 90% of media is in the hands of Whites, who control content, project whiteness (local South African adverts have a 85% White representation) and marginalize and exploit Africans, with the exception of Africans being 86% represented in alcohol adverts. 97% of mainstream South African films are owned, produced and directed by non-Africans.


Logistics Deficit: A Critical Challenge for the Country’s Competitiveness Featured
Written by Berihun Mekonnen
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It has been widely recognized that the Ethiopian international trade has been in trouble for so long despite the growth it has been registering. The time consuming and costly customs clearance process, the weak and poorly coordinated logistics and transport services and the underdeveloped warehouse and inspection mechanism among others have been obstructing the performance of the sector.


Reposted for the 75th Anniversary of Italy's Fascist Crimes in Ethiopia.


Ghelawdewos Araia

This essay will make a brief historical synopsis and analysis of the crimes perpetrated by the Italian fascists against the Ethiopian people in the 1930s. At this particular juncture, it may sound ironic to revisit the crimes against humanity committed in Ethiopia by Fascist henchmen like Marshall Pietro Badoglio and Marshal Rodolfo Graziani, but sometimes the past contends with the present especially if justice has not been served and no official apologies extended by state and/or religious leaders of the perpetrator nation.This essay is also aimed at reinforcing the Global Alliance for Ethiopia, a group of Ethiopians’ initiative in an effort to convince the Vatican and Pope Benedict XVI to apologize to Ethiopians as he has done to the Jews in Germany with respect to the Holocaust committed by the Nazis. As a matter of fact, one of the members of the Global Alliance for Ethiopia, Ato Kidane Alemayehu has written a letter to the Holiness Pope Benedict XVI (Vatican_Apology_to_Ethiopia.doc) but to this day no answer was given.


Genius calculation without computer by Ethiopians 

Building businesses with Big Data - the African way
A unique opportunity to leap ahead of the rest of the world is presenting itself to the continent as the race is on to harness the power of information which could significantly boost bottom lines 
Written by Kidane Z. Haile, IBM Software Group Director of Information Management Labs, Africa

Kidane  Zerihun HaileAfrica’s technology and business leaders have in their hands an unprecedented opportunity to surpass their global counterparts. If we can harness the vast and growing sources of information known as “Big Data”, members of the C-suite – particularly Chief Marketing Officers (CMOs) and Chief Information Officers (CIOs), who increasingly share the responsibility for growth and innovation – stand to not only significantly boost our organisations’ bottom lines, but catapult our brands into positions of global leadership and best practice.Source:

http://www.africanbusinessreview.co.za/magazines/14015/page1


Reflections on the Ethiopian Anti-Terrorism Law Debate between the EPRDF and the Ethiopian Opposition Parties
IDEA Viewpoint September 9, 2013
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

The purpose of this essay is to critically appraise the issues surrounding terrorism in general and the Ethiopian Anti-Terrorism Law in particular. This essay would not favor or disfavor any of the contending debaters; on the contrary it would objectively analyze the nature, characteristics, and spirit of the debate.  The debate between the ruling party and the opposition, perhaps, could signal the reemergence of civil dialogue that could ultimately lead to national reconciliation and, in turn, to national development in which both the Government and the opposition could play a role and collaborate in the making and transformation of Ethiopia. 


New Ethiopian Parliament Building Complex Winning Proposal / Treurniet Architectuur + Michiel Clercx Architectuur + Addis Mebratu & S7 Architects PLC 
A join venture between Treurniet Architectuur, Michiel Clercx Architectuur, Addis Mebratu and S7 Architects PLC recently won the international design competition for the new building complex for the Ethiopian Parliament. The project represents the wide variety of 85 million people living across a fascinating landscape of 1,000,000 km2. The new building is of significance for every individual, every ethnic group, its thoughts, its interests and its own way of living. By creating a recognizable shape whith a strong symbolic value, the architects make full use of the site located on the hill in the middle of Addis Abeba. More images and architects’ description after the break.


100 Wells for Ethiopia
Since 2009, Smile Generation and their community of generous patients have supported the work of charity: water to bring access to clean, safe drinking water to those in need. This year, they want to go bigger. Their goal is to fund 100 wells by the end of 2013 so they can provide 25,000 people in Ethiopia with clean water. Join them!


World Bank Sees Ethiopia GDP Grow at 7 Percent for Medium Term
Source: VOA News

Reuters
ADDIS ABABA — Ethiopia's economy is likely to grow seven percent a year over the next three to five years, below its average of the last decade, and to push that rate higher, the government needs to change policy to encourage private investment, the World Bank said.


New rail project in Ethiopia evoke memories of glory days
By Matthew Newsome in Addis Ababa
Source: rfi

In the first of a five-part series on railways in Africa, we visit Ethiopia, the first country in Africa to have a railway. The French-built railway connected the capital Addis Ababa to the Red Sea port of Djibouti. However, the old diesel railway is now being replaced by a Chinese-built electrified railway, a grand plan that seeks to transport the country’s commercial exports to its neighboring countries.

Rhythm divine: the Ethiopian nun whose music enraptured the Holy Land
Jersusalem's classical music lovers honour Emahoy Tsegué-Mariam Guebrù, 90, after a life devoted to God and the piano From a small, spartan room in the courtyard of the Ethiopian church off a narrow street in Jerusalem, a 90-year-old musical genius is emerging into the spotlight.
For almost three decades, Emahoy Tsegué-Mariam Guebrù has been closeted at the church, devoting herself to her life's twin themes – faith and music. The Ethiopian nun, whose piano compositions have enthralled those who have stumbled across a handful of recordings in existence, has lived a simple life, rarely venturing beyond the monastery's gates


Corruption, weak institutions and Africa’s curse.
Were those Africans leaders conforming to the right path of development! Most Post -independence States and Political Parties established on the basis of Social Welfare such as better pay for the workers, health care services, education for Africans and Infrastructure.
There is a very big link between Strong leaders and Strong Institutions, like the Asian countries of Singapore, South Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan. It was largely due to the influence of the Strong leaders in these nations that transformed them from the third World to First world.


Ethiopia's Meles Zenawi: an extraordinary legacy on environment and development
By Nicholas Stern

Africa Report



Swedish retailer H&M Looks to Source Clothing From Ethiopia
Source: Wall Street

Retailer Hopes African Country Will Help Keep Shelves Stocked
STOCKHOLM—H&M Hennes & Mauritz AB HM-B.SK -1.63% is looking to Ethiopia as a new low-cost country in which it will produce clothing, as the apparel retailer races to keep shelves stocked at a growing number of stores world-wide. The Swedish company relies heavily on Bangladesh for clothes production, and a move to Africa would expand its sourcing footprint but not replace its commitment to production in Asia. One supplier says H&M is looking to source one million garments a month from Ethiopia.


Ethiopia launches revamp of flagging tourism industry
By ANDUALEM SISAY in Addis Ababa 
Source: Africa Review

"The she comes!" shrieked the older white lady, her finger excitedly pointed towards the blue sky.
Her younger male companion quickly snatched up the binoculars on the table and zeroed in on the drone about to land. The time was about 4:20 pm, and the two were seated at the terrace of the Bekele Molla Hotel in Arba Minch, southern Ethiopia., According to a tourist guide in Arba Minch, since the Washington Post newspaper reported the presence of a United States drone base in Ethiopia in October 2011, tourists have flocked to the city hoping for a sighting as they take in other attractions.


AGOA forum opened in Ethiopia as US seeks closer ties with Africa
Source: Xinhua 

The Ministerial Session of the 12th Africa Growth Opportunity Act (AGOA) Forum was opened on Monday at the African Union (AU) Conference Center in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia.
At the opening session, Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn expressed hope that potential will be fully tapped in cooperation between sub-Saharan Africa and the United States.


Israel Chemicals considering potash mine in Ethiopia
Site is cheaper on balance than other places worldwide, closer to company’s main markets.
By Yoram Gabison  Source: Haaretz
Israel Chemicals has been in talks recently with a Canadian listed company Allana Potash about opening a potash mine in Ethiopia. Allana Potash CEO Farhad Abasov met with ICL senior management in Tel Aviv three weeks ago to seek ICL's participation in the construction of a mine at the Dallol site in Ethiopia's Danakhil Valley, located in the country's northeast.


Tom Campbell: Wrong to favor Egypt in water rift 
By TOM CAMPBELL / Register Columnist 

Egypt's sense of nationhood is tied up in control of the Nile. So is energy self sufficiency for Ethiopia. The clash between these two realities can have deadly consequences. America will be tempted to intervene – on the wrong side. The issue is a major dam proposed by Ethiopia on the Blue Nile River, the source of over 80 percent of the water that eventually enters the Nile River system. The Blue Nile starts in Lake Tana in Ethiopia, and flows through tall, narrow chasms to the Sudan border. Within Sudan, the Blue Nile meets the White Nile in Khartoum, and from there flows into Egypt.


A meeting with Ayte Berhane Kidane Mariam, the Director of EFFORT and TPLF CC member

Seattle, Washington, August 12, 2013 was held in Seattle. The meeting was hosted by UTNA Seattle Chapter and attended by a lot of concerned Tigreans. The meeting was held in an atmosphere of harmony and total unity and brought on new vigor. It brought a renewal of the spirit of collaboration to participate in full gear and to be part and parcel in contributing to the development effort.

Ayte Berhane Kidane Mariam spelled out the objective of his presence in visiting Seattle. With his eloquent and persuasive ability, he explained the situation in Tigrai in areas of development and the role of EFFORT to uplift the hope and aspiration of many Tigreans from poverty to self-reliance. As he puts it, the main objective of the visit had a dual purpose: to explain the development activities that are taking place in the Tigrai region and to get a feedback from concerned Ethiopians from abroad. 


The Bureaucratic Empire: Serving Emperor Haile Selassie 
By Seyoum Haregot, The Red Sea Press, 2013 

Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD 
August 6, 2013 

This is a well-written and thoughtful book. It is sharp, stimulating and exquisite and I could not stop reading it. The book is full of authentic anecdotes in relation to the author’s private and political life and contains five parts and a total of thirty two chapters. The chapters, incidentally, are not the familiar chapters that one encounters in conventional textbooks in terms of length; some of them are indeed one page or one and half pages, but they are precise, concise, and to the point especially in documenting the overall political scenario in Ethiopia during Emperor Haile Selassie. By contrast, Chapter one runs into 51 pages and chronicles the nature and characteristics of governance and political personalities in detail.  


For Ethiopian Women, Construction Jobs Offer A Better Life
Source: NPR


The investment paradox that is Ethiopia
By LEE MWITI | Thursday, August 1 2013

This past week, a high-profile Kenyan business delegation visited Ethiopia to scout for private investment opportunities. They will, like many other curious foreign investors, most likely have come away encouraged by the market potential and momentum in the country of 85 million. 
Ethiopia is not your everyday African country. Laying claim to one of the richest histories, it is a curious mix of commercialism existing side by side with remnants of communism. Some would describe it as the quintessential modern Orwellian state.Widespread poverty mirrors the opulence of an elite few and a fast-growing middle class. To change this, the current leadership is on a manic mission to haul the economy into the 21st century through massive infrastructural investment.


Analysts: New Leadership Slow to Bring Change to Ethiopia
By Marthe van der Wolf

Source: VOA News

ADDIS ABABA — It has been almost one year since Hailemariam Desalegn came to power in Ethiopia, following the death of his predecessor Meles Zenawi. Despite recent demonstrations and a cabinet shuffle, little seems to have changed in the East African country. After weeks of speculation, Prime Minister Meles Zenawi's death was announced last year, on the morning of August 21st. The passing of the longtime ruler made way for his deputy Hailemariam Desalegn, to lead the second most populous nation on the African continent.


Civil Society
20 years of freedom? Not for Eritrea's youth

Eritrea suffers from very high rates of poverty, with two-thirds of the population considered poor by the UN. Over one-third of all Eritreans are considered very poor.One of the country's most controversial policies is compulsory military service for both young men and women, sometimes for unspecified amounts of time. Many youth attempt to flee the forced service. They escape via the sea, in makeshift rafts, often well aware of how life-threatening the journey itself can be. Others become victims of human traffickers as they pass through the Sinai Peninsula. Still, nearly one million Eritreans live in exile, some 20 percent of the population.


Ethiopia says Eritrea 'continues support' to Somalia's Al-Shabab - ST
By Tesfa-Alem Tekle

July 29, 2013 (ADDIS ABABA) – In fresh allegations made by Ethiopia on Monday, the East African nation said that efforts to maintain peace and stability in Somalia is taking longer due to Eritrea’s continued support of the Islamist militia group, Al-Shabab. The Ethiopian government said despite ongoing efforts by regional governments and the African Union peace keeping force (AMISOM), Eritrea continues to undermine peace efforts in war-ravaged Somalia


Egypt Rules Out War With Ethiopia Over Nile River Hydropower Dam
By Fred Ojambo 
Source: Bloomberg

Egypt has no plans to go to war with Ethiopia over the Horn of Africa nation’s construction of a hydropower dam on the Nile River, said Mona Omar, special envoy for Interim Egyptian President Adly Mansour. Former Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi told supporters last month his government will “defend each drop of Nile water with our blood.” Mursi, overthrown by the army on July 3, had a failed foreign policy and Egypt plans to negotiate with Ethiopia about the dam, Omar told reporters today in the Ugandan capital, Kampala.


Anti-Ethiopia article from American University Faculty and Al Jazeera
By Dula Abdu

Recently there were strings of articles hostile to Ethiopia most emanating from Aljazeera. Many Ethiopians are concerned about it in light of remarks by Egyptian politicians to destabilize Ethiopia by planting false propaganda and sabotage. One of the articles originated from two scholars from American University. Ambassador Akbar Ahmed, Chair of Islamic Studies at American University in Washington and Frankie Martin, an Ibn Khaldun Chair Research Fellow at American University's School of International Service, wrote a piece entitled "The Oromo and the War on Terror in the Horn of Africa" and claimed that Emperor Menelik from 1860-1900 killed 5 million Oromos. This is unknown to many Ethiopian and many historians. Some believe this is part of the propaganda to destabilize and saw the seeds of division as envisioned by the Egyptian government in order to stop the construction of the Nile Dam in Ethiopia.


 


Economic Analysis of Lean Wastes:
Case Studies of Textile and Garment Industries in Ethiopia

[Tsegay Tesfay Mezgebe, [Hadush Berhe Asgedom, Ethiopian Institute of Technology-Mekelle, Mekelle University, and Asayehgn Desta, Sarlo Distinguished Professor of sustainable economic development, Dominican University of California, USA Abstract

In today's competitive world, customers are demanding for better quality products with fast and reliable deliveries. To meet this demand, textiles and garments manufacturing technologies in developed countries have established lean production principles to minimize and/or remove waste elements in their production system in order to produce new products and ultimately achieve improvements in their manufacturing processes. However, since labor has become expensive component to produce textiles and garments in the developed countries....


ETHIOPIA’S CAPTURE OF THE BLUE NILE
In addition to Egypt’s latest political turmoil, its government is extremely worried about Ethiopia’s newest dam on the headwaters of the Blue Nile. The Blue Nile is the leading source of water for the north-flowing Nile. Fears in Egypt and the Sudan are that the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam will radically reduce the Nile’s flow.  Ethiopia seeks to become a major exporter of electricity. Its leaders are hoping that exports of electricity to neighboring countries within a decade will surpass coffee as a source of revenue. Ethiopia’s latest hydroelectric project (GERD) will reduce the flows to the Nile Valley. Because the Nile is Egypt’s “lifeline” in its desert environment, the dependability of its flows are critical downstream.


Ethiopia signs $700 mln mobile network deal with China's Huawei
By Aaron Maasho

ADDIS ABABA, July 25 | Thu Jul 25, 2013 3:45pm EDT 
(Reuters) - Ethiopia on Thursday signed a $700 million agreement with China's Huawei Technologies Co Ltd to expand mobile phone infrastructure and introduce high-speed 4G broadband network in the capital Addis Ababa and 3G service throughout the country. Huawei, the world's second largest telecom equipment maker, has been involved in developing phone and internet services in the Horn of Africa country for several years.


Ethiopia plans 'cradle of mankind' museum to boost tourism

By ANDUALEM SISAY in Addis Ababa
In attempts to boost its tourism, Ethiopia plans to construct a unique museum dedicated to archaeological findings such as Lucy, Selam and other remains of early hominid specimen.
Already, The Ministry of Culture and Tourism has secured 4,500 square meters of land in central Addis Ababa around the National Museum. “The Museum will be the first of its kind,” said Mr. Amin Abdulkadir, Minister of Culture and Tourism of Ethiopia. Of the 14 human origin specimen, 12 are found in Ethiopia. Researchers agree that the evidence makes Ethiopia the cradle of mankind.  In addition to boosting country's revenue through tourism, the museum will also play an important role in promoting Ethiopia’s tourism industry.


Black Egyptians decry daily racism 
Non-Arab Africans say they are routine victims of discrimination by officials and on the street. 
Black, non-Arab Africans say the case reveals long-standing racism that threatens the security and livelihoods of Egypt's sizeable sub-Saharan population. While refugees in the country face an overburdened and highly bureaucratic asylum system and aid organizations are under funded and ill equipped to help them, non-Arab refugees face much more serious problems.


Nation Building in Africa at Stake

Com Athyei K Byamugisha

While addressing the crowd at South Sudan’s 2nd independence anniversary in Juba this year , president Museveni remarked that  solutions to African problems must be home grown but not from outside. This seems to impress with Museveni being looked at as the only surviving revolutionary after the late Muamar Gadafi and aging Robert Mugabi on the continent. The Ugandan story seems to be rosy in terms of economic figures but the reality is of grim picture of humiliating poverty and misery impacted through state bureaucratic corruption. 


Top 10 things that make Ethiopia extraordinary - CNN
Fairy tale castles, superb coffee and the Ark of the Covenant (OK, possibly) are just some of the unexpected attractions of this African country
By Oliver Robinson, for CNN 
What sets Ethiopia apart from its African neighbors?
The excellent coffee?
The fact that it was never colonized?
Or that Rastafarians regard it as their spiritual home?
Or could it be the smooth, well-maintained roads, so rare on the continent, that make exploring the country by car such a joy?
After a 1,430-kilometer drive through Ethiopia's Northern Circuit -- up mountains, through Martian-like landscapes, into lost kingdoms of yore -- we found 10 crucial things that define the country.


Al Jazeera on Ethiopia's Grand Renaissance Dam - Video
For thousands of years, the Nile River has provided for the people living along its banks. For Ethiopia, this is the key to its prosperity. The country started a dam project that will solve the country's desperate electricity problem. However, Great Renaissance Dam has raised concerns in other Nile countries, particularly in Egypt, which is concerned about the dam's possible impact on the flow of the river. Al Jazeera's Catherine Soi reports from Ethiopia


July 20, 2013The Exigency of Religious and Political Toleration in Ethiopia: Reflections on The Tragic Death of Shiek Nur Imam
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD  July 20, 2013

During the reign of Emperor Yohannes I (1667-1682), a group of Armenian clergy led by a bishop visited Gondar in 1679. The Emperor was not sure whether these Armenians profess same faith like the Ethiopians or not and he assigned two of his council scholars, namely Qostantinos and Arseyanos to interrogate and open dialogue with them by way of conducting a Q & A session. Thus, Qostantinos interrogated the bishop of Armenia on pertinent religious dogmas such as the nature of Christ, the Virgin Mary, lent during epiphany etc. Ultimately the dialogue resulted in the satisfaction of Emperor Yohannes and he declared the Armenians as “brethren”. 


Supporting GERD is a must; no ifs, no buts.
Godofai Tgiorgis June 27, 2013

tgiorgis12@yahoo.com

The Grand Renaissance Dam has been a hot bed for many arguments, pro and against, not only among countries who are directly affected but also among Ethiopians since the beginning of its construction. Understandably, one would not feel insulted if countries that claim to have entitlement, however de facto, argue against the dam because their privilege is now contested.  What is insulting is however when one hears the very same tone from people who identify themselves as Ethiopians. One would even be accommodating if such concern and opposition came from a visible problem the dam poses, a drastic environmental damage for example. But it does not. Why are the opposition groups crying foul then? Crocodile tears aside, it is not for Ethiopia’s advantages, definitely not for the people. 


Brian Stewart: Egypt's other existential crisis — the Nile
Ethiopia's construction of a giant hydro dam near the headwaters of the Nile has Egypt's leaders talking military action

By Brian Stewart, special to CBC News  Jul 15, 2013
It is also discussing with Russia the purchase of 18 modernized SU-30 jet fighters to further beef up an air force that is regarded as one of the most capable on the continent. (Ethiopian pilots now train South Africa's.) Most analysts doubt this so-called "river conflict" will lead to actual war. However, we do live in exceptionally unpredictable times as the upheavals across North Africa and the civil war in Syria clearly show.


Ethiopia Plans to Make WTO Offer on Services by September
By William Davison
Source: Bloomberg

Ethiopia will submit an offer to the World Trade Organization on access to services such as banking and telecommunications before the next meeting of a decade-long accession process in September, a Trade Ministry official said. Last year, Ethiopia submitted suggested tariffs on goods to the 159 member countries of the Geneva-based body for negotiation, Geremew Ayalew, head of the trade relation and negotiation directorate at the Trade Ministry, said in an interview in the capital, Addis Ababa. The Horn of Africa nation is now working on offers for 160 service industries, some of which are controlled by the state.


Eritrea: back to the dark ages
7July 12, 13 by Martin Plaut

This information comes from sources with direct contact with people living in Eritrea. It gives a unique picture of life under a regime that tolerates no independent media coverage – national or international. Note: the unofficial exchange rate is 70 – 75 Nakfa to the £. Life in Asmara today It has been almost two weeks since there has been any electricity supply in Asmara and those who have no access to generators are in the dark. Their mobile phones are dead too… Scarcity of petrol and diesel means public transport is difficult. Horse drawn carts and wheel-burrows have returned to the streets. People use their carts to transport water. In many areas of the city taps have run dry. People queue for hours to get water, filling jerry cans and barrels and carting them off.


Pan-African land grabbing expose launched
Call for story proposals: FAIR has created a partnership with the US based Oakland Institute (OI) to investigate specific cases of land grabbing in Africa. [Deadline: July 15]
OI has pioneered investigative research in this field that has changed policy, broken corrupt deals, etc. See more at www.oaklandinstitute.org
We are looking for eight to ten journalists who are highly skilled with a history of innovative investigative journalism, able to travel to remote areas longer periods of time, intelligent, able to speak to diverse audiences (from corporate to displaced peoples), and who are ready and willing to get their hands dirty. 


Ethiopia Continues Dam Construction 
July 11, 2013 VOA Marthe van der Wolf

Ethiopia and Egypt have been in a diplomatic dispute for weeks over the construction of what will be Africa’s largest hydro-electric dam - impacting the waters of the Nile River. But with Egypt facing political turmoil at home, attention has also been diverted from this controversial project.The massive construction of the Great Ethiopian Renaissance Dam continues despite sometimes angry protests from Egypt. At issue is - diverting part of the Blue Nile since May.


Is Egypt on the brink of further divide? 
As the influential al-Nour party suspends its participation in the transition, we examine its role in Egyptian politics. More than 40 people have been killed, and as many as 500 injured, in gunfire at Cairo's Republican Guard headquarters, where former President Mohamed Morsi is thought to be held. People at the scene have told Al Jazeera many of the dead were shot as they prayed. But the military blamed the shooting on what it called an armed terrorist group that had tried to storm the barracks - saying at least two of its own soldiers had also been killed.


Bank sees China, Ethiopia as good fit
Updated: 2013-07-05 12:44 
By Li Lianxing ( China Daily)

New partnership aims to remove obstacles to foreign investment in promising African nation 
Ethiopia is attracting significant Chinese foreign direct investment, but has still been lagging in overall FDI. However, an official from the World Bank says a partnership between the bank and Chinese companies will help remove obstacles that have been preventing Ethiopia from becoming one of Africa's most attractive destinations for investment. Guang Z. Chen, country director for Ethiopia at the World Bank, says the bank is a major player in Africa, providing local soft financing and bringing in knowledge-based services and technical assistance. Chen believes the bank's cooperation with Chinese companies could greatly improve Africa's development.
 


Bribe paying still very high worldwide but people ready to fight back
More than one person in two thinks corruption has worsened in the last two years, according to the world’s largest public opinion survey on corruption from Transparency International, but survey participants also firmly believe they can make a difference and have the will to take action against graft. The Global Corruption Barometer 2013 is a survey of 114,000 people in 107 countries and it shows corruption is widespread. 27 per cent of respondents have paid a bribe when accessing public services and institutions in the last 12 months, revealing no improvement from previous surveys. Still, nearly 9 out of 10 people surveyed said they would act against corruption and two-thirds of those who were asked to pay a bribe had refused, suggesting that governments, civil society and the business sector need to do more to engage people in thwarting corruption.


Congratulations Ethiopian University Students Class of 2013
IDEA Editorial
July 8, 2013

The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA), Inc. extends its heartfelt congratulations to all 2013 Ethiopian Universities graduates and celebrates their highest academic achievements with them. IDEA is proud to witness the spectacular and remarkable milestone that the Ethiopian students of 2013 have made and have colorfully celebrated in all the university campuses. There are now more than thirty universities in Ethiopia; the oldest is Addis Ababa University and the newest Addigrat University. While the former has been conducting graduation ceremonies since its foundation as University College of Addis Ababa in 1950, the latter has yet to celebrate its first graduates. In between these two universities fall many universities such as Mekelle University, Jimma University, Wollo University, Bahir Dar University etc.


Insight - Africa makes the grade for richest U.S. university investors
By Tosin Sulaiman

JOHANNESBURG | Sun Jul 7, 2013 11:09am EDT 

(Reuters) - America's wealthiest universities are venturing into Africa's fast-growing frontier markets in search of outsized investment returns that will allow them to offer scholarships, lure star professors and fund research. For Sub-Saharan Africa, recognition from these deep-pocketed U.S. institutions, who have often earned envy among fellow global investors for their strong returns, marks a significant shift. American university endowments - permanent funds of educational institutions - pride themselves on spotting new investment opportunities early, such as venture capital, private equity and natural resources such as timber. Combined, they manage assets of over $400 billion.


Freedom and Slavery
G.E. Gorfu 

Nietzsche found that all existing moral ideas might be divided into two broad classes, corresponding to the two broad varieties of human beings - the masters and the slaves. Every man is either a master or a slave, and the same is true of every race. Either it rules some other race or it is itself ruled by some other race. It is impossible to think of a man or of a people as being utterly isolated, and even were this last possible, it is obvious that the community would be divided into those who ruled and those who obeyed. The masters are strong and are capable of doing as they please; the slaves are weak and must obtain whatever rights they crave by deceiving, cajoling or collectively intimidating their masters.. 


Three questions on Egypt: Three radical scenarios and one viable option 
President Morsi has made many political miscalculations, but the opposition is divided and Egypt's deadlock persists. Last Modified: 02 Jul 2013 

How did Egypt descend into this dangerous political deadlock? 
There are a number of reasons why Egypt has descended into this situation. First of all, the Muslim Brotherhood and its political wing, The Justice and Freedom Party, chose to govern alone without soliciting support from the wider political spectrum.


Egypt ministers resign amid unrest 
Five quit Mohamed Morsi cabinet on second day of huge demonstrations across the country.
01 Jul 2013 14:24 

Five Egyptian ministers have tendered their resignations from Mohamed Morsi's cabinet, a senior official has said, as protests against the president's rule filled the streets of cities throughout the country.Earlier on Monday, the state news agency, MENA, said the ministers were considering resigning in sympathy with the protesters who were calling for the resignation of Morsi.


Army delivers ultimatum to end Egypt crisis 
President Mohamed Morsi and opposition groups told they have 48 hours to calm protests, or face intervention.

Gregg Carlstrom Last Modified: 01 Jul 2013
 



A true Ethiopian gives homage to Ras Alula, the great and legendary general of Ethiopia...

Language for whose Audience in the Ethiopian context? A Message to PM Hailemariam Desalegn
IDEA Viewpoint
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

June30, 2003
This viewpoint is intended to critically appraise the mode of communicative language Ethiopians use whenever they want to express their ideas in the form of speech or writing. The majority of educated Ethiopians (high school to advanced degree levels) like to either speak in English or in Amharic or other Ethiopian languages bombarded with English language, even when they address illiterate peasants who don’t understand English at all. It has become increasingly fashionable for urbanite “educated” Ethiopians to use Guramayle (English and Ethiopian languages) to exhibit that they are civilized and modern, but in doing so they have utterly disregarded the majority of Ethiopian people, who apparently are uneducated. They speak without due consideration of their audience, and most importantly they seem to have forgotten that the most sophisticated educated people are those who communicate with their audience in the language that the latter understands.


The theory and practice of Meles Zenawi
African Development: Dead Ends and New Beginnings, by Meles Zenawi. Unpublished Masters Dissertation: Erasmus University, Rotterdam, no date.

Alex de Waal*
Alex de Waal (Alex.DeWaal@tufts.edu) is Executive Director of the World Peace Foundation at the Fletcher School,  Tufts University.
In the months following his death on 20 August, Ethiopia's Prime Minister Meles Zenawi has been eulogized and demonized in equal measure. But his policies, and the transformational paradigm on which they were based, have rarely been elucidated. While alive, Meles was equally indifferent to praise and blame. To those who acclaimed Ethiopia's remarkable economic growth, he would ask, do they understand that his policies completely contradicted the neo-liberal Washington Consensus? To those who condemned his measures against the political opposition and civil society organizations, he demanded to know how they would define democracy and seek a feasible path to it, in a political economy dominated by patronage and rent seeking? 


Analysis: Egypt protesters look to army backing
By HAMZA HENDAWI 

The Associated Press CAIRO — 
Just a year ago, Egypt's liberals and pro-democracy youth movements were demanding the military, which took over from the ousted Hosni Mubarak, leave power. But after a tumultuous year under a freely elected Islamist president, many of them are hoping for the army's protection as they try to force out Mohammed Morsi with protests this weekend. Morsi's opponents calculate they can push him to go through the sheer number of people they bring into the streets Sunday — building on widespread discontent with his running of the country — plus the added weight of the army's backing.


Egypt’s Empty Bluff!
On June 3rd 2013, Egypt’s leader, President Mohamed Morsi, held a meeting with some other Egyptian plotters to discuss measures his country could take to thwart the Blue Nile dam project that Ethiopia is constructing. According to the information made available by mainstream media, most of the attendants around Morsi’s discussion table were representatives of Islamist groups like himself. The most astonishing part of the round table talk is not the bulling rhetoric that Egypt’s government has been pushing for centuries, acting as if they were the sole owners of the Nile, but the way they want to disseminate their pompous propaganda.


Egypt and the Hydro-Politics of the Blue Nile River 
By Daniel Kendie, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
Abstract 

As early as the 4th century B.C., Herodotus observed that Egypt was a gift of the Nile. That observation is no less true today than in the distant past, because not only the prosperity of Egypt, but also its very existence depends on the annual flood of the Nile. Of its two sources, the Blue Nile flows from Lake Tana in Ethiopia, while the White Nile flows from Lake Victoria in Uganda. Some 86% of the water, which Egypt consumes annually, originates from the Blue Nile River, while the remainder comes from the White Nile. Since concern with the free flow of the Nile has always been a national security issue for Egypt, as far as the Blue Nile goes, it has been held that Egypt must be in a position either to dominate Ethiopia, or to neutralize whatever unfriendly regime might emerge there. As the late President Sadat stated: " Any action that would endanger the waters of the Blue Nile will be faced with a firm reaction on the part of Egypt, even if that action should lead to war." 1


Better Late than Never:
The Imperatives of Immortalizing our Martyrs 

Asghedom G. Michael, PhD

Martyrdom 22-June-2013
Martyrdom is the suffering and death of a martyr. Who is a martyr? A martyr is a person who sacrifices himself/herself so that truth prevails for the benefit of those who remain. That is a person who fights for freedom, justice, and equality in all spheres of life (health, education, political voice, all-inclusive development, etc.) for the well-being of all citizens of a given nation. A martyr is a Samaritan, a humanitarian, and a compassionate. These human traits are naturally incarnated in a martyr’s flesh and blood. Our martyrs embodied all these and more special traits.


Ethiopia and Egypt agree to bridge dam divide
Source: Al Jazeera

Foreign ministers try to quell tensions over Ethiopia's plans to divert Blue Nile in controversial dam project. Ethiopia and Egypt have agreed to hold further talks on the impact of a huge Ethiopian dam project to quell tensions between the two countries over water-sharing. "We agreed that we will start immediately on consultations at both the technical level... and the political level," Egyptian Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamel Amr told reporters after meeting in Addis Ababa with his Ethiopian counterpart Tedros Adhanom on Tuesday.


Berhanu Nega receives half a million “grant” from Egypt to run Ginbot 7 and ESAT (Audio)
Awramba Times (Phoenix, Arizona) – Dr. Brhanu Nega (aka Ethiopia’s Ramirez Sanchez) has Confirmed in his own words that he received half a million Dollar (through Eritrea) to create chaos back in Ethiopia. According to Awramba Times confidential informants, the original source of this grant is the Egyptian government.  Please listen Dr. Berhanu’s explanation below


Beware Of Warmongers
Saleh "Gadi" Johar June 17, 2013 
Egypt_Ethiopia  Awte.com
If you notice, most fires of war are fueled by those who would not be burned by it. To them, it is just like a movie, you cheer one side against the other and no matter who wins, you forget about it the moment you see another movie. The violence in movies is make believe, the people who die actually never do, therefore, producers include gruesome violence to satisfy the viewers. However, in actual wars people die, properties are destroyed and families fall apart. It is unlike the fake wars of pyrotechnics that actors fight, earn millions and laugh about it.


Ethiopia, Egypt tone down talk of war over Nile dam
By Aaron Maasho

ADDIS ABABA | Tue Jun 18, 2013 8:35am EDT 
(Reuters) - Ethiopia and Egypt cooled talk of war on Tuesday and agreed to more dialogue to resolve a row over a giant dam that the Horn of Africa nation is building on the Nile, on which Egyptians depend on for almost all their water. Africa's second and third most populous nations have traded barbs in past weeks about Ethiopia's new hydroelectric project, which Egypt fears will reduce a water supply vital for its 84 million people, who mostly live in the Nile valley and delta.


Egypt’s Nile Threats Weaken Case to Secure Water: Shinn
By William Davison and Salma El Wardany - Jun 17, 2013 

Egypt must drop its objection to an Ethiopian dam on the main tributary of the Nile River or it may struggle to ensure adequate supplies from the world’s longest waterway, former U.S. Ambassador to Ethiopia David Shinn said.  A $4.3 billion, 6,000-megawatt hydropower plant, set to be Africa’s largest on completion in 2017, has raised concern in Egypt that it will cut supplies of water allocated by accords put in place more than five decades ago. President Mohamed Mursi told supporters in Cairo on June 10 his government will “defend each drop of Nile water with our blood” if the country’s water security is threatened. 



News Analysis: Nile issue, political instability lead to Egypt's stock market slump
English.news.cn by Marwa Yahia

CAIRO, June 6 (Xinhua) -- As Egyptian stock exchange lost more than 1 billion U.S. dollars with the main EGX30 index dropping 2.6 percent to 5,083 points on Wednesday, analysts said investors' fears of Egypt's instability and a political crisis between Cairo and Ethiopia over Renaissance Dam is to blame for the stock market slump. The EGX30 index continued its downward trend Thursday, shedding 0.21 percent to 5,061 points, while foreign investors, who represent around 39 percent of the market, tending to sell the negatively impacted trading. Experts said the tensions between Egypt and Ethiopia sparked by the dam that is planned to be built on the Blue Nile and will affect the Egyptian share of water, as well as the expected massive anti-government protests called upon by Rebel campaign on June 30 have been the main reason behind the falling stock market


Museveni Warns Egypt As Nile War Looms
Giles Muhame 

President Yoweri Museveni has sternly warned the Egyptian “government and other groups” against making “chauvinist and irrational statements” in the wake of Ethiopia’s decision to construct a multi-billion dollar electricity dam, Chimp Corps report.  “I have seen in the print media statements coming out of Egypt regarding the commendable work of the Government of Ethiopia of building dams for electricity in that country,” said Museveni.


Egypt Has No Choice but to Cooperate with Ethiopia On The Issue of the Nile 
IDEA Editorial

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD
June 12, 2013

Egypt claims its so-called “historic rights” on the basis of the 1929 and 1959 treaties, apparently superimposed on Africans by the former colonial powers. Egypt must realize that the majority of the riparian states no longer accept the old treaties by which the country had been accorded 87% use of the Nile. However, this does not mean Egypt won’t continue to have rights on the use of the Nile; on the contrary, the people of Egypt will continue to enjoy the waters of the Nile in spite of the dam construction project in Ethiopia. Most importantly, the Ethiopian people will not flinch in the face of any threat and they are determined to extend full support to the Ethiopian government and the engineers and construction workers on the ground, so that they could complete the construction of the Grand Renaissance Dam as scheduled in 2016.


Ethiopian parliament votes to strip Egypt of rights to majority of Nile water
Tensions rise between neighbors over £4.7bn Great Renaissance Dam project

Reuters in Addis Ababa 

guardian.co.uk, Thursday 13 June 2013 
Ethiopia's parliament has unanimously ratified a treaty that strips Egypt of its right to the lion's share of the Nile river waters, raising the political temperature in a dispute between Cairo and Addis Ababa over the construction of a dam. The parliament's move follows days of irate exchanges between two of Africa's most populous nations over Ethiopia's new hydroelectric plant, which Egypt fears will reduce a water supply vital for its 84 million people.


How Egypt Might Try To Stop Ethiopia's Dam Project
Ethiopia’s initiation of a dam project on the Blue Nile has quickly drawn the ire of Egypt, which is critically dependent on it as a source of much of the country’s freshwater needs. As Egyptian Foreign Minister Mohamed Kamel Amr said June 9 following Ethiopia’s refusal to halt construction of the dam and ahead of his trip to Addis Ababa to discuss the project, Egypt will not give up a “single drop of water from the Nile.” ”No Nile, no Egypt,” he said.


Law Professor Urges Ethiopia to Take Nile Issue to International Court
Posted by EthioPro on June 11, 2013

Chapman University Law School Dean Tom Campbell
New York (TADIAS) – In the late 1990s, long before the Egyptian cabinet got caught on live television discussing to sabotage Ethiopia’s $4.7 billion Grand Renaissance hydroelectric dam

project, a law professor and his students at Stanford University were quietly researching the legal case that could assist Ethiopia in the event that the inter-country conflict ended up at the International Court of Justice for resolution. 
“I was very happy when I learned Ethiopia was going ahead with the Blue Nile Gorge project; and then very concerned when the Egyptian cabinet meeting conversation leaked, referring to Egypt’s going to war against Ethiopia,” said former Congressman Tom Campbell who is currently the Dean of Chapman University School of Law in Orange, California. “What totally irresponsible statements.”


Ethiopia rejects Egyptian protests over Nile dam 
Construction of Grand Renaissance dam to continue despite Egyptian concerns over impact on water supply and farming 
By Patrick Kingsley in Cairo, The Guardian June 12, 2013 
"Of course we are going to go ahead with the project, because we believe we are justified," Reda said. "Why would a self-respecting government spend $4.5bn simply to spite Egypt? It's beyond reason and it's beyond science. None of the concerns of the Egyptians [are] really something you can remotely associate yourself with."



NILE| SHINN: AMERICA WILL INTERVENE IF TENSIONS ESCALATE TO CONFLICT
Amb. David Shinn is an Adjunct Professor of International Affairs at The George Washington
University’s Elliott School of International Affairs.
He was United States’ Ambassador to Ethiopia and Deputy Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassy in Sudan. David Shinn also served as Desk Officer for Somalia, Djibouti, and assistant for Ethiopia, State Department coordinator for Somalia during the U.S. intervention, Director of East and Horn of African Affairs, among others.
Read below his interview with Youm7 (an Egyptian privately-owned Arabic daily) on June 1, 2013.
Question: Did the Egyptian government pay the required attention or exert the appropriate efforts regarding the Nile Basin issues and is there a political solution to the problem?


Ethiopia says it won't bow to Egyptian pressure over Nile dam June 07, 2013 
By Aaron Maasho

ADDIS ABABA: Ethiopia's construction of a dam on a tributary of the Nile is not open to negotiation, the Addis Ababa government said on Friday, as a confrontation with Egypt over the project 

escalated.

A picture taken on May 28, 2013 shows the Blue Nile in Guba, Ethiopia, during its diversion ceremony. AFP PHOTO / WILLIAM LLOYD GEORGEThe Cairo government said this week it would demand the project be halted, after its southern neighbor began diverting a stretch of the river to make way for the $4.7 billion dam that will become Africa's biggest hydropower plant. Ethiopia said it had summoned Egypt's ambassador to explain comments by politicians in Cairo advising Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi to take hostile action to halt the building of the dam. A spokesman for Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn said Cairo's position on the dam was unclear and its concerns were often not based on science. Ethiopia has set out plans to invest more than $12 billion in harnessing the rivers that run through its rugged highlands and to become Africa's leading power exporter.


'No Nile, no Egypt', Cairo warns over Ethiopia dam
ReutersBy Shadia Nasralla |

Last week, Ethiopia summoned the Egyptian ambassador after politicians in Cairo were shown on television suggesting military action or supporting Ethiopian rebels - a mark of the threat felt in Cairo from the plan to dam the Blue Nile, the tributary that supplies the bulk of water downstream in Egypt. "Egypt won't give up on a single drop of water from the Nile or any part of what arrives into Egypt from this water in terms of quantity and quality," Amr told MENA, noting that Egypt has little rain and is effectively desert without its great river.


Kaizen Initiatives at the
Ethiopian Wonji Sugar Manufacturing Company 
Asayehgn Desta, Ph.D.

Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development
Dominican University of California

Introduction
Faced with emerging global competition and substantial changes in consumer needs, desires, and tastes, a number of enterprises today are rapidly making adjustments to re-engineer their manufacturing processes to meet these needs. The dynamic kaizen strategy is an activity of continually revolving cycles of Plan, Do, Check and Act (PDCA) which focuses on customer-driven processes to improve productivity and quality of products and services by amassing marginal improvements over time.


 

Sudan and Egypt clash over Ethiopia's Nile damBy MOHAMMED AMIN in Khartoum
Thursday, June 6

A rare disagreement has occurred between Sudan and Egypt over the possible impact of an Ethiopia dam on the downstream Nile basin countries.
The controversial Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) could see the course of the Blue Nile tampered with and Egypt has warned it would spare no effort to guarantee its share of the water.
But Sudan is warning of a possible water war between the Nile Basin countries because of Egypt’s ‘provocative' stance Sudanese government spokesman Ahmed Bilal has asked Egypt to stop what he called provocations after an Egyptian opposition leader described Khartoum's stand on in the issue as disgusting. An Egyptian opposition leader, Mr Ayman Nour, publicly described the Sudanese stand on the Nile as disgusting. 


Ethiopia official labels Egyptian attack proposals over new Nile River dam ‘day dreaming’
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — Egyptian officials tried to cool tensions with Ethiopia Wednesday over the new Nile River dam project by highlighting its “neighborliness” as the Ethiopian prime minister’s spokesman insisted that nothing would stop the dam from being completed upstream from Egypt, which is wholly dependent on Nile River water. Egypt fears a diminished flow from Africa’s largest dam and hydropower station but Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi said Egypt respects Ethiopia and will not engage in any aggressive acts against the East African nation. Egyptian politicians had suggested the country should sabotage the project in a meeting with the president Monday.


Ethiopia has moved from fourth lowest place for the number of out of school children in the country to third, taking India’s place. However, there has been significant progress in Ethiopia over time: There are now 1.7 million children out of school in Ethiopia (as per latest data from 2011) compared to 2.4 million in 2010.  Over the past five years, the country has improved the numbers of children out of school by 59%. 
This puts Ethiopia in second position for the largest progress in absolute terms (number of out of school children) of any country in the world over the past five years, and in sixth position in relative terms (% of children out of school). Ethiopia received a 3% share of total aid to basic education in both 2010 and 2011 – the sixth highest individual share of any country in the world in 2011 (eighth in 2010). Kate 


Regarding the dam
Mahmoud Salem June 3, 2013 

All the while, many talking heads started spouting nonsensical crap about an Egyptian military strike on Ethiopia, while seemingly screaming in all of their interviews that “We are too strong and powerful for Ethiopia to mess with”. Never mind that Ethiopia was never conquered in any war and that our military never fought in the south and cannot protect its soldiers within our borders, and that there is zero evidence that the Ethiopian military- which is not weak- will kneel in front of our military might. I am chalking this up to temporary insanity caused by over-heating of the brain due to lack of consistent air conditioning in the middle of the horrible heat-wave we are currently experiencing. Let’s assess the situation, shall we?


Exploring an Ethiopian Poet by Pure Accident
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

June 5, 2013

It was a nice spring day and I went out for a quick shopping to the Hamden Plaza in Connecticut, 

and in the Stop and Shop I bumped into a dignified Ethiopian by the name Gashaw Lake. He was with his wife and daughter and when we were about to greet and introduce each other, in the traditional Ethiopian manner, which has now became increasingly a rare commodity, he lifted his hat and greeted me. 

I was delighted to encounter the best of Ethiopian values but I must admit that I was subconsciously compelled to reciprocate by bowing while shaking the hand of my Ethiopian brother.In the tradition of poetry, the power of Gashaw’s poems authenticate reality by successive stanzas and cadences, and these are best exemplified by the many poems dedicated to either family members or random Ethiopian and/or African American personas. For instance, ለጋሼ ሲራክ is for General Sirak Tesfa; ምን ያለ ያገር ሰው is for the late Professor Asrat Woldeyes; Eይዋት ስትናፍቀኝ is obviously for the late famous Ethiopian singer Tilahun Gessesse; ስንብት is dedicated to Abraham Weinshet Workalemahu, and ‘The Statue’ is in honor of Whitney Young, an African American who struggled for human rights. ‘The Statue’, incidentally, has an emancipating power because it represents “a sanctuary for people’s rights”.


On the Renaissance Dam
Ethiopia's decision to divert the Blue Nile could be a defining moment that pushes Egypt to embrace genuine African unity

Ahmed Mahmoud , Saturday 1 Jun 2013
In summary, Ethiopia is suffering a great deal and needs a helping hand. Because we ignored our ties to these vital states Ethiopia has turned to the US to assist its renaissance, although I have doubts about genuine US interest in the renaissance of Ethiopia or any developing country.
Second, building the Renaissance Dam could be very risky for Ethiopia despite the benefits. Should we leave our Ethiopian brothers to take the risk or should we study the issue more diligently instead of demanding an aggressive response?


Ethiopia dam is 'declaration of war': Al-Gamaa Al-Islamiya
Ahram Online , Thursday 30 May 2013
Sheikh Abdel-Akher Hammad calls on Egypt to defend its honour and oppose construction of Ethiopian dam

Ethiopia's Renaissance Dam and the diversion of the Blue Nile is a declaration of war on Egypt, Sheikh Abdel-Akher Hammad of Al-Gamaa Al-Islamiya said on Wednesday. 
On Tuesday, Ethiopia began diverting the course of the Blue Nile, one of the Nile River’s two major tributaries, as part of its project to build a dam for electricity production. Speaking on Al-Arabiya satellite channel, Hammad claimed the move would reduce Egypt's water supply and damage national security. "If such a war is forged against us, we are ready to fight and we will embark on it with all our strength to defend our honour," asserted Hammad. 


Nile| Renaissance dam’s unnoticed impact on Ethiopian psyche
Posted by Merkeb Negash 

“The humiliation of a thing is sufficient to stimulate it; the humiliation of a country is sufficient to rejuvenate it” - Book of Rites (Chinese literature) When the late prime minister came up with the idea of building the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (then known as Project X), many considered it as an ambitious project that emanated from naivety. Many wondered why the government would want to build such a grand project of high cost and high stakes while it could have started with small projects that are both affordable and less sensitive.


‘Skinny guy with a funny name’: Morehouse valedictorian’s long journey to graduation
By Meron Moges-Gerbi, CNN

‘Skinny guy with a funny name’: Morehouse valedictorian’s long journey to graduation(CNN) - On a rainy afternoon this spring when President Barack Obama gave the commencement speech at Morehouse College in Atlanta, he called valedictorian Betsegaw Tadele the “skinny guy with a funny name” – a nickname Obama has often called himself.So, who is that other “skinny guy?” Tadele’s journey to sharing a stage with the president began in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, the youngest of Tadele Alemu and Almaz Ayalew’s two children. Tadele’s first name, Betsegaw, means "by God's grace" in Amharic, his native language. In the summer of 2009, Tadele came to the United States in pursuit of a higher education.


Diversity Immigrant Visa
The United States is a unique country that draws the attention of many other nations. The diversity of cultures within the United States makes it an attractive place for foreign nationals and encourages them to immigrate on a more or less permanent basis. You may also be one of the foreign nationals who wants to settle in the United States but do not know how to immigrate to the country of your dreams. If you seek to immigrate to this great nation, you must know about the country and about how to get an immigrant visa. Immigrant visas are absolutely necessary for foreign nationals to enter the United States and to become permanent residents with Green Cards.


PRESS RELEASE
Tony Elumelu advocates for Africapitalism as the solution for Africa’s development

MARRAKESH, Morocco, May 31, 2013/ -- Charity and aid have failed Africa and its leading entrepreneurs are now driving the continent’s development agenda.
This was the sentiment of Tony Elumelu’s speech, described by many as “powerful,” which was delivered at the African Development Bank’s (AfDB) Annual Board of Governors meeting held in Marrakech, Morocco. The speech was followed by a panel discussion moderated by the BBC presenter Zeinab Badawi with Ronald Lauder, founder of the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation.


Views and Opinions
By Shimelis Amare May 27, 2013
Recently, I spent about six weeks in Ethiopia and what I have seen and observed reinforce the opinion I have regarding the current government: on one hand they are successfully working to transform the nation and to eradicate poverty, and on the other hand, they are miserably failing to build strong and viable institutions. During my stay, I carried conversations with a lot of people to find out why this paradox exists.


How Islamist militancy threatens Africa Comments 
BBC

The countries of North and West Africa have become embroiled in a new war waged by violent Islamist militants - a conflict that has no front line.Last week's suicide assaults in Niger on a military base and French-run uranium mine, and a siege in January of the gas plant in Algeria reveal the insurgents' ruthless tactics. And the start of the withdrawal of French troops from Mali, four months after recapturing northern cities from Islamist insurgents, is being touted by the militants on internet forums as the beginning of their victory.


Kenya police raped, tortured refugees in 'rampage': rights group
By Katy Migiro

Wed May 29, 2013 9:11am EDT 
NAIROBI, May 29 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Kenyan police tortured and abused more than 1,000 refugees, asylum seekers and Somali Kenyans in Nairobi in a "10-week rampage" beginning in late 2012, Human Rights Watch (HRW) said in a report on Wednesday. The abuses were part of a police crackdown that began the day after an attack on a crowded bus in the Somali-dominated suburb of Eastleigh, which killed seven people, HRW said. No one claimed responsibility for the blast.


Petitioning His Imperial majesty Haile Selassie I,STATUE
A STATUE FOR EMPEROR HAILE SELASSIE! 

His Royal Highness Emperor Haile Selassie 1, had played crucial role in financing the Headquarters of the OAU, because of Emperor Haile Selassie, Ethiopia in 1923 was admitted to the League of Nation, the Emperor condemned Italy’s aggression and using of chemical weapons on Ethiopians in the League of Nation, the Emperor’s internationalist views enabled him to become a member of the United Nations, the Emperor condemned apartheid South Africa at the UN, the speech the Emperor and his firm stand of being anti-Fascists around the world made him "Man of the Year" in Time Magazine,




The Rise of the Sun People: A New Morning Breaks in Africa
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD May 24, 2013

For the last two decades I have been telling my students that Africa will one day rise, and it looks the time has arrived for a triumphant and jubilant Africa. The golden jubilee of the founding of the OAU (now AU) thus would not simply be a gathering of African heads of states and governments, a conventional conference with underpinning conventional wisdoms, but a landmark in the history of the continent that signals the preliminary achievements of the Lion Kings. It will also signal that, at long last, the sun people have managed to overcome centuries old of obstacles and a new morning has indeed broken in the African continental landscape.


As East Africa faces famine, autocratic Eritrea suffers in silence as refugees flee
MAI-AINI, Ethiopia - Alem Teke watched her crops in Eritrea shrivel and die from drought. She braved landmines and escaped being raped by soldiers to save her children from starvation by fleeing across the border to a refugee camp in neighboring Ethiopia. Alem, a farmer's wife, made it to the Mai-Aini refugee camp in Ethiopia. She was more fortunate than some of her friends who were raped. Like many people fleeing famine that has hit parts of the Horn of Africa, Alem has overcome the odds to escape hunger, but as the world focuses on famine in Somalia, Eritrea suffers in silence.


More to the poverty discussion than China
By Ben Leo, Special to CNN

Editor’s note: Ben Leo is Global Policy Director of The ONE Campaign, an international advocacy organization co-founded by Bono. The views expressed are his own.
GPS recently published a thoughtful piece on how global poverty rates are falling fast. It argued that one country in particular is almost solely responsible for this dramatic trend: China. Meanwhile, it said progress in the rest of the world “has been much, much slower – if there’s been progress at all.”


Ethiopia: BBC Reports Ethiopia Has One of World's Fastest Growth Rates
By Zeryhun Kassa, 20 May 2013

Once known for its famines and dependency on foreign aid, Ethiopia now has one of the world's fastest growth rates. This is a report by the BBC in connection to the 50th African Union Anniversary gathering pace to be celebrated in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The report says some of that growth is coming from small businesses - and George Alagiah has been to a shoe factory with a difference in Addis Ababa. Following is the full text of the story George produces from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.


Map of Secret Prison Network in Eritrea Pinpoints “Infrastructure of Repression” 
Contact: Suzanne Trimel, strimel@aiusa.org, 212-633-4150, @AIUSAmedia

(NEW YORK) – Twenty years after gaining independence, Eritrea’s prisons are filled with thousands of political prisoners who are locked up in atrocious conditions without ever being charged with a crime, said Amnesty International Wednesday in a briefing that includes a map offering an unprecedented look at the network of secret prisons." The government has systematically used arbitrary arrest and detention without charge to crush all opposition, to silence all dissent, and to punish anyone who refuses to comply with the repressive restrictions it places on people’s lives,” said Claire Beston, Amnesty International’s Eritrea researcher.


The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA), Inc. is proud to announce the launching of Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia�s new book. For contents of the book, please click on the following link: www.africanidea.org/Ghelawdewos_Araia_New_Book.html and individual subscribers (including students) interested in purchasing the book should send a check of $25 ($20 + $5 for shipping and handling) payable to �Ghelawdewos Araia� to 1199 Whitney Ave Suite 523 Hamden, Ct, 06517; institutions including libraries should send $35 ($30 + $5 for shipping and handling). For further information, email webmaster@africanidea.org or call (203) 789-1990 (203) 747-2763 (203) 537-0240


Behind the Façade of Corruption in Ethiopia and what the Government ought to do

IDEA viewpoint

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD May 12, 2013

Corruption is a very intriguing concept in theory and an elusive human conduct enmeshed in bizarre 

and rather subtle but toxic human activity, and it is manifested in different forms, as well as assumes different scales and scopes. To be sure, unless there is a system in place to monitor corruption or there is a political system strong enough to mitigate, if not eliminate this disease, it could pervade the larger society like a malignant cancer. Another major façade that the Government of Ethiopia should seriously rethink is the patronage politics or patron-client relationship that has engulfed Ethiopian government bureaucracies at local, regional, and federal levels. 


Ethiopia arrests minister, 11 others over corruption
(Reuters)
- Ethiopian police have arrested a minister and 11 other people on corruption charges, an official and state media said on Saturday, in the country's most high-profile swoop against graft for more than a decade. Businesses in the region regularly complain of corruption as an obstacle to their work. Transparency International ranked Ethiopia 113 out of 176 nations worldwide in its 2012 perception of corruption index, where No. 1 is considered least corrupt. The spokesman said there were further arrests as well but did not give a total. The state news agency reported 12 arrests overall. Independently, newspapers said the arrests included a prominent businessman and customs employees outside the capital. Global Financial Integrity last year said Addis Ababa lost $11.7 billion in outflows of illegal funds in the past decade.


Population Explosion and Population Crash Part II

by G. E. G.
In part I of this series we saw how population increase is directly tied with the production, availability, and distribution of food. We also saw that the imminent population crash that appears to be inbuilt in the current exponential growth might not occur but that there could be many small crashed until a new vista opens up for the next cascade of population rise. We pointed at technology as one of the keys factors that would open the way to the next vista of population growth. We also suggested ways to increase food production by directly going to grass and leaves and figuring out ways to take out their toxicity and make them edible for humans.


Ethiopia's journey from poverty to prosperity
By Haddis Tadesse
Source: World Economic Forum

The walia is a species of ibex found only in northern Ethiopia. Some 40 years ago, with fewer than 200 left, the walia was in danger of extinction. It remains an endangered species, but through conservation measures, numbers are increasing. Things are getting better. The development of the walia’s home country – Ethiopia – is even most robust. As leaders from around the world gather in Cape Town, South Africa, for the World Economic Forum on Africa, they will be talking not about the wali but about countries like Ethiopia, and comparing notes on the challenges and opportunities they represent.


Kofi Annan: Africa plundered by secret mining dealsBy 
BBC Friday, May 10

Tax avoidance, secret mining deals and financial transfers are depriving Africa of the benefits of its resources boom, ex-UN chief Kofi Annan has said. Firms that shift profits to lower tax jurisdictions cost Africa $38bn a year, says a report produced by a panel he heads. "Africa loses twice as much money through these loopholes as it gets from donors," Mr Annan told the BBC.It was like taking food off the tables of the poor, he said. The Africa Progress Report is released every May - produced by a panel of 10 prominent figures, including former Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo and Graca Machel, the wife of South African ex-President Nelson Mandela.


Population Explosion and Population Crash Part II
In part I of this series we saw how population increase is directly tied with the production, availability, and distribution of food. We also saw that the imminent population crash that appears to be inbuilt in the current exponential growth might not occur but that there could be many small crashed until a new vista opens up for the next cascade of population rise. We pointed at technology as one of the keys factors that would open the way to the next vista of population growth. We also suggested ways to increase food production by directly going to grass and leaves and figuring out ways to take out their toxicity and make them edible for humans.


Egypt Investment Collapsing as Citizens Turn Into Vigilantes
By Tarek El-Tablawy, Mariam Fam & Salma El Wardany - May 8, 2013

More than two years after the fall of President Hosni Mubarak, the proliferation of weapons and a spate of vigilante killings, violence and sexual attacks are eclipsing the hope born from the revolt. Fueled by political deadlock and economic stagnation, the security breakdown threatens to put solutions beyond the reach of President Mohamed Mursi.


Why Self-proclaimed Kaizen Management is becoming very fashionable in Ethiopia? An Observation

 Asayehgn Desta, Ph.D.

Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development

Dominican University of California

Despite the current economic slowdown in Japan (for example, according to Global competitiveness, Japan’s stance has declined from 8 in 2009/10 to 9 in 2011/12), it is very interesting to note that a number of public and private enterprises in contemporary Ethiopia are proclaiming that the Japanese kaizen management strategy (meaning change for better or continuous improvement involving everyone in the organization) would restore for them the quality and quantity of their products


Egyptian investor says Ethiopia has every right to construct the Renaissance Dam: Revision
In just about 15 months of studying the possible opportunities here, an Egyptian businessman has seized the advantage to dive into the Ethiopian manufacturing sector:
Alaa El Sakaty is interested in making money by setting up three factories in the Tigray Regional State. During an exclusive interview he gave to The Reporter, El Sakaty said he is making progress in setting up furniture, electric power transformer and sesame processing factories here. The furniture factory is planned to kick-start production in two months, where chipped-wood production is enormous in the Tigray region. The transformer factory is making its way to finalization, where half of the machineries are already in place, he said
.


2013 World Press Freedom Index: Dashed hopes after spring
After the “Arab springs” and other protest movements that prompted many rises and falls in last year’s index, the 2013 Reporters Without Borders World Press Freedom Index marks a return to a more usual configuration. The ranking of most countries is no longer attributable to dramatic political developments. This year’s index is a better reflection of the attitudes and intentions of governments towards media freedom in the medium or long term. The same three European countries that headed the index last year hold the top three positions again this year. For the third year running, Finland has distinguished itself as the country that most respects media freedom. It is followed by the Netherlands and Norway.


Africans endangered 
We are seeing and hearing more tales involving deportation of Africans on planes amid screams and resistance                                                                                                                    News from the Middle East concerning the predicament of over 700 black Africans, most of them of South Sudanese and Eritrean origin, facing the prospect of deportation from Israel is a rude awakening. This comes on the back of violent protests in Tel Aviv in which two black Africans were targeted while driving on the streets of this famous biblical city. According to estimates the figure of Africans living in Israel either illegally or as asylum seekers is around 60,000.


EDITORIAL COMMENTS ON THE BLOCKING OF THE ABAY DAM BOND SALES BY ANARCHISTS AND MUSLIM EXTREMISTS. 

By Ethiopian - American Forum.

In Norway, as well as in California, some Anarchists, Muslim Extremists, OLF supporters, Shabiya and others recently blocked the sales of Abay Dam Bonds by force as shown in the videos below. Supporting the Abay Dam has nothing to do with supporting or opposing EPRDF (i.e. the current Government). The Abay Dam will promote economic development in Ethiopia among other things.


An Empirical Investigation on Innovative Practices of Electromechanical Manufacturing: The Case of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in Mekelle City, Ethiopia: 
 Mengstu Ashebre, Lecturer Mekelle University; Gebremeskel Kahsay (PhD), Assistant Professor, Mekelle University and; Desta, Asayehegn, Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Dominican University.
ABSTRACTA review of the literature reveals that manufacturing small and medium scale enterprises (SMEs) and support institutions in developing countries, like Ethiopia, are not able to identify the major determinants that affect innovation practices and their effects. The purpose of this study is therefore to identify innovation determinants of electromechanical SMEs and examine their marginal effects
.


Dr. Aberra Molla interview on ETV 
The young Aberra Molla demonstrating science to Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia, the royal family and guests (1965). ግዕዝ በኮምፕዩተር እንዲሠራ ከፈጠሩት ከዶ/ር ኣበራ ሞላ የግዕዝ ቀለሞች በኣንድና ሁለት መርገጫዎች እንዲከተቡ የፈጠሩት ኣዲስ ዘዴ ሕዝቡ በነፃ በኣማርኛ እንዲጠቀምበት ኣበርክተዋል። የኣዲስ ኣበባ ዩኒቨርሲቲ ተማሪዎች ግሩም ኣስተያየትም ኣለበት።በነፃ ድረገጽ ላይ በግዕዝኤዲት ለመጻፍ የሚከተለውን ይጫኑ፦ http://freetyping.geezedit.com


Ethiopia to Get Chinese Funds for $1 Billion Hydropower Line
By William Davison

Ethiopia will receive funds from China for a transmission line valued at $1 billion that will bring electricity from a hydropower plant to the capital, Addis Ababa according to a government official. 
The 619-kilometer (385-mile) link from the 6,000-megawatt Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam on the Blue Nile River will be constructed over the next three years by China Electric Power Equipment and Technology, Deputy Prime Minister of Economy and Finance Debretsion Gebremichael told reporters in Addis Ababa today. 


Ethiopia: Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn's interview with France 24 
Source: France 24

Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn was elected as chairman of the African Union in January. Since then, he has to deal with the war in Mali. After months of fighting, the country still needs the international community’s military support and faces a food crisis. Moreover, Mali has been in political limbo for more than a year. Hailemariam Desalegn tells Marc Perelman about his efforts to promote the reconciliation process in Mali and help Malians address the root causes of the crisis.


Taxi-hailing app startup Hailo seeks to avoid Uber-like controversy, gets 1,200 Boston cabbies on board

Kyle AlspachVC Editor- Boston Business 

"In January, Hailo surveyed 200 cab drivers in Boston and found that 60 percent spend between a quarter and half of their shifts without passengers and many work more than 60 hours a week just to make ends meet," Beker and Colas wrote in a blog post on Wednesday. "We believe technology and a service that does not take advantage of drivers — and only wins when they win — is the key to Boston’s new and better taxi service."


Judge to review Uber rules amid plans for new taxi-like app in Denver
By Andy Vuong The Denver Post

The question over whether a transportation app maker should fall under the same regulations as taxi companies will be the subject of a public hearing Tuesday. Administrative Law Judge Harris Adams will hold a hearing to discuss his proposed revisions to transportation rules that could impact how Uber Technologies operates in Colorado.


US-BACKED EGYPT MILITARY "TO CONTROL NILE" | ISRAELI MEDIA 
April 23rd, 2013 

Egypt's military, financed by the United States, has been preparing for what could be a war for control of the Nile.  Western intelligence sources said the military command has urged President Mohammed Morsi for a buildup meant to block any attempt to divert the Nile. They said the military envisioned a crisis with Ethiopia that could threaten water supplies to Egypt and Sudan.  "For the Egyptian military and government, this is perhaps the most burning security issue today," a source said.  The sources said Morsi has sought to form a military alliance with Sudan to prevent Ethiopia from constructing a dam along the Nile. The Renaissance Dam was meant to draw 84 billion cubic meters of water from the Nile, sufficient for hydroelectric power. 



Saudi king removes deputy defense minister in royal reshuffle
By Angus McDowall

RIYADH (Reuters) - Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah has removed veteran deputy defense minister Prince Khaled bin Sultan from his post, state media reported on Saturday, the latest move in a reshuffle among princes holding government jobs in the U.S.-allied kingdom. Switches of important posts between princes are closely watched because they indicate possible changes in the line of succession in the monarchy, the dominant power among Gulf Arab states and the world's biggest oil exporter.


Egypt worried over potential negative impact of Ethiopian Dam
A report on the effects of the Ethiopian mega dam on Egypt’s water safety is to be issued late May, government official says An Egyptian government official said a technical report on the impact of the new Ethiopian mega dam, currently under construction, will reveal the need for Addis Ababa to attend to safety and environmental concerns at the construction process. The report will also reveal concerns of potential negative influence on Egypt’s share of the Nile Water "depending on the mechanism and time of water storage behind the dam," the government official added.


US Secretary of State Kerry to visit Ethiopia for AU summit
US Secretary of State John Kerry on Thursday revealed he will attend an African Union summit in Ethiopia next month, and said Washington had be more engaged with Africa.
The May 19-27 summit in Addis Ababa will mark the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Organization of African Unity, the predecessor to the AU.


How Could a Lasting Peace Between Ethiopia and Eritrea Be Achieved?
BY SALIH NUR
ANALYSIS

Source: Think Africa Press
After more than a decade of low-level hostilities and sour relations, there are signs Eritrea and Ethiopia could be ready to talk again. It has been over a decade since talks regarding the demarcation of Eritrea-Ethiopia border stalled, and relations between the two long-standing nemeses deteriorated into an effective cold war.


Ethiopia's SouthWest Energy eyes east Africa oil boom
By Michael Kavanagh

Financial Times
SouthWest Energy of Ethiopia aims to be the latest company to profit from east Africa’s oil and gas exploration boom after securing encouraging third-party estimates for the amount of oil contained in its licenses across the country. Tewodros Ashenafi, founder and chief executive of SouthWest, said that he expects the release on Monday this week of a report gauging prospective reserves to drive private investor support for the drilling campaign in the Jijiga Basin region.


Ethiopia: Unexpected wonders in the rock churches of Lalibela and Addis Ababa
By Chris Granet 

1 Apr 2013 15:13
Chris Granet discovers the delights of east Africa
Red rock: Bet Abba Libanos church, Lalibela

Red rock: Bet Abba Libanos church, Lalibela

 

A gold-robed deacon stood in front of a makeshift altar at the shadowy heart of the nave, clutching a staff as he led the mournful chanting. Surrounding him was a cluster of white-shawled priests, some holding bibles and candles, others ornate crosses and icons. Around them were throngs of pilgrims, also robed in white, lost in a reverie of chanting and praying.


Egypt, Ethiopia Headed For War Over Water
By: Mustafa al-Labbad Translated from As-Safir (Lebanon). 

In the coming years, Egypt and Ethiopia may be forced to fight a “water war” because Ethiopia’s ambitions contradict Egypt’s historical and legal rights in the Nile waters. Ethiopia can only be deterred by the regional and international balance of powers, which in recent years has favored Ethiopia. For any Egyptian government, Egypt’s water share and securing the Nile’s headwaters are the top national security priorities, irrespective of the Egyptian government’s ideology or domestic policies. This fact is dictated by geography. For thousands of years, Egyptian rulers have been aware how important water is for Egypt. Water is the lifeline of Egypt (97.5% of Egypt is barren desert). Egyptian rulers have always used any means to defend their country’s historic rights to the Nile waters. As Greek historian Herodotus said, "Egypt is the gift of the Nile.” 


Ethiopia, China eye stronger ties
ADDIS ABABA, March 24 (Xinhua) -- Ethiopia and China on Sunday expressed the hope to lift their cooperation and bilateral relations to a new level. The two sides exchanged views on the issue during a meeting between Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn and Chen Fengxiang, deputy head of the International Department of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC). Chen is here as the head of a CPC delegation attending the 9th Organizational Congress of the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF), the ruling party in Ethiopia, held in the town of Bahir Dar, some 560 km north of Addis Ababa.


The Hague - The Latest Warlord Being Dragged from - The Congo

by G. E. G.
On this sad day that I read the passing of Chinua Achebe, the great author of Things Fall Apart, I also read with dismay of the Congo rebel leader, General Bosco Ntaganda,* who left for The Hague under the custody of the so called: “International Criminal Court officials” for trial for his acts of genocide and ‘crimes against humanity’. Don’t get me wrong. I have no sympathy for the man and know nothing more about his criminal acts except what has been reported in the media. That being said, I feel sad and ashamed to see African leaders being dragged like sheep and goats and herded into a European prison and put on trial. Is Africa still a colony of Europe?


EPRDF Elected Members

Newly elected Politburo (executive committee of TPLF)
1. Abay Weldu
2. Azeb Mesfin
3. Dr. Debretsion G/micheal
4. Dr. Tewodros Adhanom 
5. Tirfu K/mariam
6. Alem G/wahid
7. G/meskel Tareke
8. Tewodros Hagos 
9. Beyene Mekru
The vacated positions of Meles Zenawi (deceased), Abadi Zemo (Ethiopian Ambassdor to Sudan), and Tsegay Berhe (National Security Advisor to the PM) replaced by Tirfu K/mariam, G/meskel Tareke and Alem G/wahid


“Between the Jaws of Hyenas”
A Diplomatic History of Ethiopia (1876-1896)Richard Caulk 
Richard Caulk 

Edited and with an introduction by Bahru ZewdeHarrassowitze Verlag, Weisbaden, 2002
Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia 
March 21, 2013

In the introduction to the Book that Bahru wrote, he succinctly captures the distinct roles Yohannes and Menelik played when the Italians encroached Ethiopia’s northern most territory: “The death of Yohannes meant the fall of the north, for he was ‘the linchpin for the defense of the northern highlands’…When he died at Matamma, the loss of the Marab Mellash, as Eritrea was then known, became almost inevitable. Menilek certainly seems to have come to acquiesce in it, although he made some effort to salvage what he considered essential parts throughout the 1890s.”


Egypt: A Coup In The Wings?
By Conn Hallinan
blog
March 14, 2013

When an important leader of the political opposition hints that a military coup might be preferable to the current chaos, and when a major financial organization proposes an economic program certain to spark a social explosion, something is afoot. Is Egypt being primed for a coup?
It is hard to draw any other conclusion given the demands the International Monetary Fund (IMF) is making on the government of President Mohamed Morsi: regressive taxes, massive cuts in fuel subsidies, and hard-edged austerity measures whose weight will overwhelmingly fall on Egypt's poor.


Ethiopia: A Potentially Golden Block on East Africa’s Tertiary Rift
Posted On : March 7th, 2013 

The terms would be fairly attractive, with the Ethiopian state taking 10% of any discovery. Tullow and partners plan to build a total of 11 wells in what is labeled the Kenya-Ethiopia Frontier Basin. Three of those wells will be in Ethiopia. Ethiopia also has an estimated 3.89 billion tons of oil shale (enough to produce about one trillion barrels of oil, roughly) in Tigray State, on the border with Eritrea. It is also believed to have around 100-120 million tons of oil shale in the Delbi.


Egyptians were Dark Black Africans – The Evidence
March 19th, 2013 
By Black T Bvumavaranda

Could the great and mighty Pharaohs of Egypt be actually Zimbabweans, or South Africans? Well, here is the evidence: While the contemporary world has ordinarily portrayed Egyptians as being inclined to Arab descendancy, a little has been said in history about the overwhelming evidence pointing to the majority of the Egyptians that lived during the biblical days, the days of the construction phase of the pyramids as well as the most interesting historical phase of Egypt. These were dark black Africans as noted from irrefutable pieces of evidence in art, paintings and many other Egyptian features that occupy their culture and museum buildings.


Many Africans from war-torn Somalia and Ethiopia seek their luck across the sea in Yemen. Luck they hardly find. Racism they do. 
By Judith Spiegel, Sana'a source RNW

Somali refugees at a UNHCR camp in Yemen, July 2007The black man on the bus, they pat him on the head and push him in the back. They make jokes about his pronunciation of the name of the market he is going to. He sits still, waiting for the humiliation to pass.A Somali man gets beaten at the bus station because he allegedly stole something. He doesn’t fight back, but cries. Passersby look the other way. Minutes later, a woman is ignored by the bus driver because he doesn’t want Africans onboard. She patiently waits for the next bus.


Discontent at the Top: Mismatching Disjointed Eritrea
March 15th, 2013 

On 21st January, 2013, something momentous that the opposition was hoping for took place in Asmara: about one hundred soldiers, supported with two tanks, took over the Ministry of Information and were able to broadcast two demands: the implementation of the constitution and the release of political prisoners. After that, EriTv went non-operational for hours. We also know that soon after the occupation of the Ministry, the mutinous soldiers were surrounded by loyal troops, a standoff that allegedly set the context for “negotiation”. There was also additional news that, in the end, the leaders of the insurgency attempted an escape, which was reported both in opposition and regime sources, with some variations on the details of the fate the escapees. The rest of the information still remains scant and obscure.


Development Improves in Ethiopia, But Just Slightly
By Martha van der Wolf

VOA News
ADDIS ABABA — The United Nations Development Program has released its 2013 Human Development Index. Despite recent economic growth, Ethiopia is still near the bottom of the index.
Ethiopia ranks 173 out of 187 countries in the Human Development Index 2013, unveiled by the United Nations Development Program, UNDP, on Friday. The Index is part of the Human Development Report that is presented annually and measures life expectancy, income and education in countries around the world.


Ethiopia: The Access Real Estate saga which exposed the pernicious lies of ESAT
By Tadeos Anteneh

When the surprise but brief arrest of Ermias Amelga, the beleaguered head of Access Real Estate was announced last month, the cause of his arrest would have been obvious to the hundreds of customers who accuse him of letting them down by failing to deliver their long awaited dreams of owning homes that they could call their own. 


Dear Mr. Gorfu:
Thank you for taking the time to write. I have heard from many Americans regarding firearms policy and gun violence in our Nation, and I appreciate your perspective. From Aurora to Newtown to the streets of Chicago, we have seen the devastating effects gun violence has on our American family. I join countless others in grieving for all those whose lives have been taken too soon by gun violence.


CHINESE RAIL IN ETHIOPIA TO REPLACE HISTORIC FRENCH LINE
DIRE DAWA, Ethiopia (AFP) - Camels rather than locomotives lumber over the railway tracks in this remote desert, famously traversed by storied French adventurers Arthur Rimbaud and Henry de Monfreid in the early 20th century. The old French-built railway that connected Addis Ababa, the capital of landlocked Ethiopia, to the Red Sea port of Djibouti, is now being replaced by a Chinese-built electrified railway, a bold project that seeks to boost Ethiopia's commercial exports.


Embracing Africa’s Economic Potential
Recommendations for Strengthening Trade Relationships Between the United States and Sub-Saharan Africa U.S. Senator Chris Coons

Chair, Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on African Affairs March 7, 2013 
America is losing ground and ceding economic opportunities in Africa to competitors. China, which has made dramatic inroads across the continent in recent years, may undermine or even counter value-driven U.S. goals in the region, and should serve as a wake-up call for enhanced American trade and investment. This is truly a critical moment, as our Chinese competitors are securing long-term contracts that could lock American companies and interests out of fast-growing African markets for decades to come.


Ethiopia and the history not seen


The $156m Heineken brewery in Ethiopia will produce Harar, Bedele and Heineken brand beers Heineken to build Ethiopia’s biggest brewery
At between 4-5 litres a year, Ethiopia’s beer per capita consumption is one of the lowest in the region. Yet its market has doubled over the last five years thanks to its growing population, urbanisation and rising incomes. All this is proving to be an irresistible draw for global brewers – with Heineken the latest to announce plans to build a new $156m brewery in the country.


Mining to be Ethiopian economic backbone
TORONTO (miningweekly.com) – Sub-Saharan Africa was at the fore of the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada’s 2013 show, with projects from West, Central and Southern Africa firing the imagination of many delegates and even grabbing several headlines. But another region worthy of close attention is Ethiopia.


Aid Worker Diaries - Resilience in Ethiopia – treating the root causes of hunger and poverty
By Pankaj Kumar

Source: AlertNet
Selecting beneficiaries for any resilience project is always difficult. But one of the basic principles is that women, children, orphans and the elderly should be near the top of the queue. In Ethiopia, with its high population density, land shortages and rain failure, Concern Worldwide started to tackle food insecurity in Amhara region back in December 2011. Among those it targeted were women and members of female-headed households.


Ethiopia: The First Christian Nation?
By Brendan Pringle

For centuries, historians have widely accepted the argument that Armenia was the first Christian nation. This important claim has become a source of national pride for Armenians and has remained virtually undisputed for centuries -- until now


Expanding Ethiopia’s Impressive Successes in Health
Source: World Bank

ADDIS ABABA—The road to Dongore Difurda, a kebele or locality in Ethiopia’s large Oromia state, runs east from Addis Ababa. It is congested with traffic heading to Djibouti and the coast. About 125 km along this road, a vehicle would have to turn off onto an unmarked dirt track, passing donkey carts and grazing camels to reach the main village nestled beneath a low hill.


Open Letter to Prince Kahlid Bin Sultan, Deputy Defense Minister of Saudi Arabia:
Sir,

G. E. Gorfu 
I read your comments as reported in the Sudan Tribune of Feb. 27, 2013 where you accused Ethiopia of posing a threat to the Nile water rights of Egypt and Sudan. Where did these Nile water rights come from? Are you referring to the Treaty of 1929 where your Colonial Master of the time, Britain, gave rights to waters it did not own? If so, Your Excellency needs to know, as Ethiopia was neither a colony nor a protectorate of Britain, the issue is moot. But that is not why I am writing to Your Excellency.


Ethiopia and Kenya: An ideological competition between two diametrically opposed economic models
Source: Economist

ETHIOPIAN BORDER GUARDS at the arrivals terminal in Metema check every passport against a handwritten list of undesirables to be kept out. This a country in which the state knows best. That may be tiresome for visitors, but it has made Ethiopia one of Africa’s development stars. A newly built road leading away from the border is surrounded by intensively farmed fields of sesame, Ethiopia’s second-biggest export after coffee. Golden bundles of harvested stalks sit on fields flanked by streams. It is a long time since famine-struck 1984, when Bob Geldof sang about the country “where nothing ever grows / No rain or rivers flow / Do they know it’s Christmas time at all?”


While Rome Prepares For New Leader, Ethiopian Orthodox Church Picks New Patriarch
By Palash R. Ghosh | March 01 2013

As the Roman Catholic Church in the Vatican prepares to elect a new Pope under much media scrutiny and fanfare, one of the oldest Christian churches has already chosen its own new leader 3

with much less global attention. The Ethiopian Orthodox Church has elected Abune Matthias as its new patriarch, replacing Abune Paulos, who died of an undisclosed illness last August after leading the church since 1992. (‘Abune’ means ‘Our Father’ in the Ethiopian language.) Daniel Sefermikael, a church official, said Matthias received a majority of votes -- 500 out of 806 -- cast by church members in Ethiopia and elsewhere, Agence France Presse reported. The 71-year-old Matthias, who fled Ethiopia after a military coup by Hailemariam Mengistu in 1974, has traveled throughout the Middle East, Europe and North America in exile for decades. He will now settle in his homeland to run the church.


Miss Israel is Ethiopian immigrant Yityish Aynaw, who was entered into the competition by a friend, made aliya with her family at age 12By TIMES OF ISRAEL STAFF February 28, 2013
Yityish Titi Aynaw, a 21-year-old from Netanya, was chosen Miss Israel 2013 on Wednesday night — the first Ethiopian-born contestant to win the title.

Yityish Aynaw, Miss Israel 2013 (photo credit: Channel 2 screenshot)Aynaw, who came to Israel with her family when she was 12, was entered into the competition by a friend, and had no previous modeling experience. She said during the competition that she hoped to go into modeling “to change attitudes to dark-skinned models. I’d love to become the first Israeli (TV) host, the Tyra Banks of Israel.” Interviewed on Thursday, Aynaw, who served as an officer during her military service, said her integration into Israeli society had been greatly eased because she had been “thrown into the deep end” in the state school system, “and I learned to swim,” rather than placed in separate Ethiopians-only classes.


Ethiopia's economy benefits from returning diaspora 
By Anders Kelto, PRI's The World; 
February 28, 2013 

At a salon in Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa, customer Erica Kanesa relaxes in a leather chair.
“I’m just doing manicure and pedicure,” she says, leaning her head back while a beautician works on her nails. Spa businesses in Ethiopia are thriving because the country’s middle class is expanding, and also because of the efforts of one man. Tadios Getaco Belete was born in Ethiopia, but – like many – he fled in the 1970s when an oppressive communist government took over. He settled in the United States and eventually opened a successful salon in an upscale part of Boston.


In unusual rebuke, Saudi Arabia accuses Ethiopia of posing threats to Sudan & Egypt

February 26, 2013 (KHARTOUM) – A senior Saudi Arabian official unleashed a barrage of attack against Ethiopia saying that the Horn of Africa nation is posing a threat to the Nile water rights of Egypt and Sudan. "The [Grand] Renaissance dam has its capacity of flood waters reaching more than 70 billion cubic meters of water, and is located at an altitude of 700 meters and if it collapsed then Khartoum will drown completely and the impact will even reach the Aswan Dam," the Saudi deputy defense minister Khalid Bin Sultan said at the meetings of the Arab Water Council in Cairo. "Egypt is the most affected party from the Ethiopian Renaissance dam because they have no alternative water source compared to other Nile Basin countries and the establishment of the dam 12 kilometers from the Sudanese border is for political plotting rather than for economic gain and constitutes a threat to Egyptian and Sudanese national security "the Saudi official said.

Saudi deputy defense minister Khalid Bin Sultan (Al-Riyadh)


Terrorism in the Streets and Television Studios of Stockholm…02/25/2013…Eritrean Communities in Stockholm
Last night two acts of violence and terrorism was perpetrated in the Streets of Stockholm and the television studios of SVT in Sweden aimed against the organized and law abiding Eritrean Community of Sweden simultaneously.


Defining Heroism
Asghedom G. Michael, PhD
25-Feb-2013
Prelude
This is a historic narrative of an encounter. I met two American individuals of Ethiopian-Amhara origin at a prestigious international conference. From the abstracts of their papers, I had deduced that they were economists of high caliber. By age, they are my seniors. In our Ethiopian-traditional way, I introduced myself to each of them as a Canadian of Ethiopian-Tigraian origin. We arranged a dinner evening together. A lot of issues on sustainable development were glossed over during the casual-dinner-table conversations. But, they twisted the conversation into polemics that tended to demean Tigraians and to undermine Woyane’s contributions to modern Ethiopia’s nationhood. They tried, but failed. Knowing that chauvinism is a genetic disease that does not have a cure, I maintained my cool headedness and listened, with minimum interruptions
.


Eritreans in Sweden targeted for extortion
23 Feb 13 10:10 CET

Two men and one woman have been arrested in Stockholm on suspicion of blackmail and conspiring to commit murder in a case believed to be connected to the Eritrean regime's systematic oppression of Eritreans living in exile. The three suspects allegedly presented extortion demands from kidnappers in Egypt and told their victims that their relatives would be killed unless they paid huge sums for their release. The threats persisted for weeks until the three were arrested earlier this week


Ato Belai was born from his father, the famous Ethiopian patriot Dejazmatch Abbai Kassa and his mother, W/o Gezachin Abbai on August 22, 1927. About seven years after Ato Belai was born, 

Fascist Italy invaded Ethiopia following the 1935-36 Ethio-Italian war. Ato Belai’s love and devotion to all things Ethiopian were boundless. Even during his retirement, he continued to champion and to fight for Ethiopian cause. He was an ardent advocate for Ethiopia’s sovereignty and territorial integrity.  He was convinced that the Port of Assab and the adjoining area have been integral part of Ethiopia for centuries. He wrote a number of monographs to elucidate his position. May he rest in peace.


Investment in Tigrai, Gold mining
Tigray Resources Inc Acquires Option on Adyabo Licenses. Adyabo is in western Tigrai where there is huge deposit

Foto Friday – Ethiopia – Land of Wonders
February 1, 2013 - 6:23 PM by Rachel Neiman

Eretz-Israel-Museum_Ethiopia_manuscript

The ties between the Land of Israel and Ethiopia are as old as the Bible itself from the marriage of Moses to a woman from the land of Cush (Numbers 12:1) to the Queen of Sheba’s visit to King Solomon (1 Kings 10:1-13). Whether or not that visit resulted in a son named Menelik, as is the tradition of Ethiopian Jews, or whether Judaism arrived in Ethiopia later, what is certain is that this is the oldest Diaspora community practicing a Torah Judaism that pre-dates Rabbinic Judaism.


Ghelawdewos Araia’s New Book 2013 Release 
ETHIOPIA
Democracy, Devolution of Power, and The Developmental State 

Note: The Book is a comprehensive survey of democracy, devolution of power, and the developmental state in Ethiopia and critical and comparative analyses of contemporary Ethiopian politics and development programs as indicated in the various chapters. The seventeen chapters of the book are designed to cater scholarly research methodologies and paradigms for academic circles and to serve as handbook for politicians, policymakers as well as political scientists and political economists.


Who Owns the Nile? Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia’s History-Changing Dam
By ANDREW CARLSON 

Origins
A Publication of Ohio State University
vol. 6, issue 6 - March 2013

Who Owns the Nile? Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia’s History-Changing DamEditor's Note:
Egypt and Sudan are utterly dependent on the waters of the Nile River. Over the past century both of these desert countries have built several dams and reservoirs, hoping to limit the ravages of droughts and floods which have so defined their histories. Now Ethiopia, one of eight upriver states and the source of most of the Nile waters, is building the largest dam in Africa. Located on the Blue Nile twenty five miles from the Ethiopian border with Sudan, the Grand Renaissance Dam begins a new chapter in the long, bellicose history of debate on the ownership of the Nile waters, and its effects for the entire region could be profound.


Editor’s Note: Ayte Abebe (Radio Degen) speaks on very many levels to all political leaders and such people may have attached a different significance to his theory. To me whether I agree or disagree as a fellow Tigrean who has concern, I will post it as a caution of what must not be stifled in his free speech. It is a moral imperative for me not to silence him by failing to post his theory. As Ethiopians, in particular as Tegaru, we should be able to respect each other’s opinions and unite on common ground defending our heritage from hate mongers who made a career to destabilize our Ethiopia.   


Kidane Alemayehu
Global Alliance for Justice: The Ethiopian Cause,
4002 Blacksmith Drive, Garland, TX 75044, USA

Racism and xenophobia are direct violations of the principles of liberty, democracy, respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms and the rule of law, principles upon which the European Union is founded and which are common to the Member States. (EU Council Framework Decision 2008/913/JHA of 28 November 2008)


From Economic Dependency and Stagnation to Democratic Developmental State: Essays on the Socio-Political and Economic Perspectives of Ethiopia
Desta, Asayehgn Ph.D. Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Dominican University of California of ventures.  

Fully convinced that the Japanese kaizen management model would be an effective strategy for latecomers like Ethiopia to industrialization and realizing that the contribution of the manufacturing sector to GDP is only about 5 %, employees of thirty pilot companies from Ethiopia were sent to Japan. Chapter 8 therefore reviews the literature and develops a conceptual framework for assessing the transferability of the Japanese “kaizen” management techniques to manufacturing plants in Ethiopia.


Ethiopia Coaxes Investors as It Struggles to Finance Growth Plan
Source: Bloomberg

Ethiopia’s government plans to attract more foreign investment and boost domestic savings as it struggles to finance infrastructure and other development projects, State Minister of Finance Abraham Tekeste said. The government is seeking “concessional loans” from development banks for roads and power lines and is “aggressively promoting” investment from Europe and the Middle East, Abraham said in an interview in the capital, Addis Ababa. Natural resources, improving infrastructure and cheap labor and power mean there are “bankable” opportunities in areas such as chemicals and agro-processing, he said.


IBM in Ethiopia: it's all about data
By Katrina Manson
Financial Times
The link between one of the world’s most powerful corporate leaders and a small bank in Ethiopia might not be immediately obvious. In this case, it’s an IBM server, which powers Awash International Bank. But soon it could be a lot more if Ginni Rometty (pictured) has anything to do with it. Rometty, IBM’s chief executive, is spending a week in Africa with her top 15 executives. It’s the first time so many of them have been in one place outside New York. It’s also the first time IBM has convened its chief executives from all over the continent.


Life in an Ethiopian palace full of African leaders
Source: Africa Report

At the Sheraton Addis Ababa, in the Ethiopian capital, Heads of State, diplomats and government officials exchanged pleasantries, talking about issues, as those at diplomatic loggerheads busily avoided each other. Indulging in the padded lobby of the Sheraton Hotel in Addis Ababa, the President of Benin and outgoing president of the African Union, Boni Yayi - in spite of the seemingly omnipresent Malian crisis and the 2013 African Cup of Nations - could not be missed.


Why Election Boycott Is a Suicidal Idea and a Surer Road to Political Extinction 
By Tesfaye Habisso,

Introduction 
The purpose of this brief paper is to show the futility and failure of electoral boycotts by opposition parties in Ethiopia to bring about the desired outcome (pressure the ruling party to agree on political concessions or force regime change, etc.) or make any meaningful impact on the political process due to the existence of over 75 organizationally and financially weak and fragmented political groups which have so far played an inconsequential role in the national and regional parliaments [legislature] as well as in the government [executive branch] and the judiciary at the federal and regional levels of the nation’s political system as they have so far failed to win any worthwhile victory in the periodic elections since the birth of the FDRE Constitution in 1994/95.


Ethiopian Diaspora Politics and the People of Tigray

Ghelawdewos Araia

IDEA Viewpoint   February 2, 2013

The latest barrage and curse against the people of Tigray is fomented by a group of Ethiopians who run and manage the so-called Ethiopian Satellite Television or ESAT. This media, almost always, attacks Tigrayans and it looks that its mission is to mobilize other Ethiopians against Tigrayans, but ESAT is more of an empty kettle than a mobilizing force. Most importantly, why is it that these Diaspora Ethiopian groupings (which by the way are a minority vis-à-vis other Ethiopians in Ethiopia and outside Ethiopia) are so much focused on Tigray and Tigrayans? What could be the real cause for the Tigray phobia? The bottom line, it seems to me, is the power nexus, and the cynical Ethiopian Diaspora is troubled by the fact that Tigrayans have captured the helm of power politics in the Ethiopian state.


Faces of Africa 01/21/2013 Meles Zenawi: The man who gave back


Re: What language should Ethiopians speak?
Fiseha Haftetsion  January 31, 2013
I am writing this piece in response to Dr. Ghelawdewos Araya’s article entitled “what language should Ethiopians speak?” published on June 4, 2012 by www.africanidea.org
that was inspired, as he said, by my draft article entitled “choosing a working language in multiethnic nations: rethinking Ethiopia’s working language policy”. Dr. Ghelawdewos’s article incorporates well-articulated multifaceted issues in relation to choosing a common language in diverse countries such as Ethiopia. The central theme of his article is, however, to retain the status quo in Ethiopia i.e. Amharic and only Amharic should remain the working language of the federal government of Ethiopia. He even said Amharic should remain the working language of Ethiopia. 


Israel Admits to Coercing Ethiopian Immigrants Into Taking Birth Control

by s.e. smith January 28, 2013
Shocking news has emerged from Israel, where journalists have been exploring why the birth rate among Ethiopian Jews living in Israel appears to be on the decline. Thousands of Jews of Ethiopian origin live and work in Israel, and evidence shows the immigrant women among them were coerced into taking Depo-Provera, a long-acting birth control medication designed to prevent pregnancy for up to three months. Women were told that they wouldn’t be allowed to enter the country without the injection, and once in Israel, many of them continued to use it.

Population Explosion and Population Crash

G. E. Gorfu
The sharp increase in population over the last few decades can be seen in the exponential graph Fig. 1. Clearly, this is unsustainable. It is easy to understand why this has come about. Many advances in human technology, from improved agriculture to strides in medical and pharmaceutical sciences have allowed human beings to increase in numbers never imagined in the time of Rev. Malthus, a mere two hundred and fifty years ago.


When mutiny came to Eritrea 
Was the latest challenge to President Isaias Afawerki's rule just a taste of things to come? 


A mutiny in Eritrea went almost completely unnoticed when renegade troops staged one of the strongest challenges yet to the country’s authoritarian rule. On Monday, a group of soldiers stormed the Ministry of Information, briefly taking over the state-run television service in an apparent rebellion, which failed. They called for a change in the constitution and the release of political prisoners. Rights groups say up to 10,000 are being held.


U.S. gift of F-16 fighters headed to Egypt, despite Morsi's harsh rhetoric
By Maxim Lott January 22, 2013
FoxNews.com

Four F-16 fighter jets left the U.S. this morning, bound for Egypt as part of a foreign aid package critics say should have been scrapped when the nation elected a president who has called 

President Obama a liar and urged that hatred of Jews be instilled in children. 

A source who works on the naval air base in Fort Worth, Texas, confirmed the departure of the state-of-the-art fighter planes to FoxNews.com. Sixteen F-16s and 200 Abrams tanks are to be given to the Egyptian government before the end of the year under a foreign aid deal signed in 2010 with then-Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, a longtime U.S. ally.

 


Eritrea says 'all calm' after Asmara mutiny
By AFP | Tuesday, January 22 2013 
The statement also reportedly ordered the release of prisoners of conscience.
However, while the state-run Eri-TV television and radio broadcasts were taken off air Monday, they had resumed broadcasting on Tuesday, several sources said. "Eri-TV, under regime loyalists, has resumed broadcasting live," added the Awate website. "All ministry of Information employees have been released."


THE 'ARAB SPRING' ARRIVES IN ERITREA
By Mirjam van Reisen* | IDN-InDepth NewsViewpoint

BRUSSELS (IDN) - Arab Spring has arrived in the Horn of Africa. Young people have been 

campaigning for the last year, inspired by events in Tunisia and Egypt, phoning households in the 

country that has been in the grip of its leader Isaias Afewerki since independence from neighboring Ethiopia in 1991. The young campaigners were asking citizens to stay home on Friday afternoons to protest against the dictatorship. The country has been in clutch of fear, while journalists, church leaders, writers, politicians and ordinary citizens have been locked up in jails. The country even scores below North Korea in terms of press freedom.


Coup Attempt Is Said to Fail in Eritrea
By JEFFREY GETTLEMAN New York Times
GARSEN, Kenya — Eritrea, a sliver of a nation in the Horn of Africa that is one of the most secretive and repressive countries in the world, was cast into confusion on Monday after mutinous soldiers stormed the Ministry of Information and took over the state-run television service, apparently in a coup attempt. According to several people with close contacts inside Eritrea, the coup attempt failed, with government troops quelling the would-be rebellion and no one rising up in the streets. But many analysts said it was only a matter of time before President Isaias Afwerki, Eritrea’s brash and steely leader for the past 20 years, is overthrown — and most likely from within.


ያመፁ የኤርትራ ወታደሮች የማስታወቂያ ሚኒስቴሩን ለአንድ ቀን ከተቆጣጠሩ በኋላ ለቅቀው መውጣታቸው ተዘግቧል፡፡ወደአንድ መቶ እንደሚሆኑ የተነገረው ወታደሮች ወደ ደቡብ የጦር ሠፈራቸው የተመለሱት ከፕሬዚዳንት ኢሣያስ አፈወርቂ ጋር ከተነጋገሩ በኋላ እንደሆነ ተሰምቷል፡፡


Eritrea: 'Troops deployed' in Asmara
BBC

Reports from Eritrea say a group of about 200 soldiers backed by tanks have surrounded the ministry of information in the capital, Asmara. State TV has also reportedly been taken off air in what some have described as a coup attempt. The city is said to be calm with no shots having been fired. Eritrea's government has been criticized by human rights activists as one of the world's most repressive and closed countries. The websites of key Eritrean state and ruling party media are currently operating erratically, with the site for the ruling People's Front for Democracy and Justice (PFDJ) party inaccessible. Attempted military coup in Eritrea shuts down state TV: reports | Al Bawaba 


Ethiopia’s Diaspora Contribution to Ethiopia’s Development
IDEA Editorial January 18, 2013 
Ghelawdewos Araia

The present generation of Ethiopia is challenged by a calling from the motherland, not to cash-in but to pitch-in for the development of the country, and as Frantz Fanon once aptly put it, “each generation must, out of relative obscurity, discover its mission, fulfill it or betray it.”


Forbes and the Most Powerful People Deception
By Ivan Simic

Every year we have the opportunity to read Forbes “the World’s Most Powerful People” list which is showing us who, by Forbes opinion, is the most powerful in the world. However, as years goes by this list is becoming more of a comic story then the reality. Somehow Forbes cannot accept the reality that there is no definition or criteria to determine the most powerful person in the world.



Aid to Ethiopia: British MP responds to Guardian article
Published in The Guardian

Your report (Report, 10 January) accusing the government of funding the Liyu police force is misleading. Not a penny of British money will go to the Liyu force. We take human rights extremely seriously and recognize that reform of the special police is critical for achieving a safe and secure Somali region. That's why we are discussing with UN partners how we might work together to improve the police's human rights record.


"Independent Eritrea"
A crumbling nation and a tragedy
Ghirmay Yeibio,

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. January 2013
The premise that Eritrea was annexed and colonized by Ethiopia is highly contentious. Colonialism involves; geographic occupation, socio-economic domination, transfer of population to a new territory as permanent settlers, the subjugation of one people by another, outright enslavement, forced assimilation, exploitation of cheap labor, economic exploitation of natural resources, and creation of new markets for the colonizing nation. Did the above happen to Eritrea when it was part of Ethiopia ? These are serious questions that need to be addressed.


Ethiopia’s Expanding Sectors Prone to Corruption
By Martha van der Wolf
VOA News

ADDIS ABABA — A new study says the fastest-growing sectors of Ethiopia's economy, such as telecommunications, land management and construction, are prone to corruption. A study conducted by the World Bank and the Federal Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission was made public on Friday. At the same time, the study praises Ethiopia for its generally low levels of corruption compared to other low-income countries. Rupert Bladon of the World Bank says fast growing sectors are more vulnerable to corruption but that steps can be taken to reduce the practice.


Ethiopia to Push Health Scorecard for African Continent
Marthe Van Der Wolf

VOA News
January 12, 2013
ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA — The Ethiopian government wants a uniform health evaluation process to be introduced in all of Africa to help reduce child deaths. The idea will be recommended during an upcoming African Child Survival Conference. One goal of the United Nation's millennium development project is to reduce the child mortality rate in sub-Saharan Africa by two-thirds by 2015. So far the reduction has been 39%. Ethiopia stands out because it already has reached a 60% reduction in the mortality rate of children under five years old. The country is hosting a conference on child survival and will suggest ways to achieve a two-thirds goal.


ETHIOPIA: Concerns over HIV/AIDS funding cuts
ADDIS ABABA, 9 January 2013 (PlusNews) - Major projected cuts in US government funding for Ethiopia’s health sector could greatly undermine the progress the country has made in the fight against HIV, authorities and experts say.“There’s an AIDS spending cliff in Ethiopia, and the government is already in free fall. Next year, Ethiopia will experience a 79 percent reduction in US HIV financing from PEPFAR [the US President's Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief],” wrote Amanda Glassman, a director at Global Health Policy and a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development. Ethiopian government officials, however, told IRIN/PlusNews that, while they were concerned about the funding cuts, they had been expecting them.


It is to be recalled Ato Bisrat Amare a former TPLF security head accused Asgede the author of three books called Gahadi for name defamation, after series of appeal the court's verdict on Ato G/Selassie' s case.


First African-designed' smart phone and tablet launched By BBC | 
Friday, December 28 2012 at 14:06
A smart phone and tablet said to be the first designed by an African company have been launched. The products, designed by Congolese entrepreneur Verone Mankou, are manufactured in China. His company VMK's devices run Google's Android software. They will retail at $170 for the smartphone and $300 for the tablet. "Only Africans can know what Africa needs," said Mr Mankou at the Tech4Africa conference in Johannesburg.


Ethiopia welcomes Chinese manufacturers to take on a larger presence
Source: China Daily

As China's labor, manufacturing and resources costs continue to rise, Ethiopia, one of the least-developed countries in the world is hoping Chinese companies will consider opening more factories there. "China is one of our country's main donors in building infrastructure, a big constructor and a major technology provider," said Seyoum Mesfin, Ethiopian ambassador to China. "But China will also be a major factory owner in Ethiopia and a big market for products made in Ethiopia in the future.


New UN Special Rapporteur on Eritrea urges Government to cooperate
GENEVA (21 December 2012) – The newly-appointed United Nations Special Rapporteur on the human rights situation in Eritrea, Beedwantee Keetharuth, on Friday urged the Eritrean authorities to cooperate with her mandate, as required by the UN Human Rights Council. “I hope that the Eritrean Government would consider the mandate of the Special Rapporteur as an opportunity to start a fresh and constructive dialogue on human rights issues that have been raised by the international community and other stakeholders,” Ms. Keetharuth said. She also noted that the primary concern of the Special Rapporteur is to provide an objective, fair and impartial picture of human rights in Eritrea.


UNAIDS Executive Director applauds Ethiopia on its remarkable progress in the AIDS response

UNAIDS

UNAIDS Executive Director Michel Sidibé congratulated the country on the dramatic decline in new HIV infections it has achieved during the past ten years on 17 December, while on an official visit to Ethiopia. Between 2001 and 2011, the rate of new HIV infections in Ethiopia among adults has been reduced by 90%



Mali: History, Politics, and Fundamentalism

IDEA Editorial

Ghelawdewos Araia

The history of Mali is inextricably concatenated to the history of ancient Ghana (not to be confused with present-day Ghana), Songhay, and Kanem-Borno, civilizations that thrived in Western Africa between 700 and 1500 CE. These civilizations were collectively known as the Niger Valley civilizations, and Mali was at the center of all this. 


Report: Israel operating spy bases in Eritrea 
Stratff or intelligence group: Israel's presence in Eritrea is very focused and precise,
involving intelligence gathering in the Red Sea and monitoring Iran's activities • Eritrea wants to use Israel to influence the United States — an ally of both Israel and Ethiopia — in decisions regarding Eritrea on the international stage. 
Israel Hayom Staff
According to Stratfor, Israel has a clandestine presence in and around Massawa. |Photo credit: Google Maps  Israel is operating an intelligence gathering base in the East African nation of Eritrea to monitor Iran's activities in the Red Sea, the Stratfor Global Intelligence company revealed Tuesday. The company says it uses a unique, intelligence-based approach to gathering information via open-source monitoring and a global network of human contacts.


"Independent Eritrea" A crumbling nation and a tragedy, born of baseless fear, meaningless Hatred and a mountain of lies.

by Ghirmay Yeibio
For the leaders of this people cause them to err, and they that are led by them are destroyed. Isaiah 9:16 (KJV)

On the 19th of November, 2012 and 23 November, 2012 Asmarino.com run a couple of articles entitled Asmara’s Crumbling Buildings: Let the pictures speak - Part I and Part II which showed the pitiful state of disrepair that the city of Asmara is in today. Like all things in Eritrea, the pictures do show that the land and people of Eritrea are on the verge of demise with no or little hope of rescue. The writer Bana, from Asmara (which by the way I would like to congratulate for the excellent expose, and a job well done) describes the total destruction this way:-


Making a Mountain Out of a Molehill, Missing the Forest for the Trees?

By Tesfaye Habisso, 10/12/ 2012
Introduction

On November 29, 2012, in accordance with the FDRE’s Constitution *Art. 74 (2)], PM Haile Mariam Desalegn submitted for approval to the House of Peoples’ Representatives *National Parliament or legislative body] five nominees for ministerial posts with the aim of filling vacant ministerial positions, ensuring party loyalty and previously agreed upon ‘ethnic representation’ of the dominant ruling elites in the EPRDF coalition government, and guaranteeing collective responsibility and effective leadership, managerial continuity, competence and administrative capacity of the cabinet that he inherited from his former mentor and role model, the late PM Meles Zenawi.


THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF MELES ZENAWI
African Development: Dead Ends and New Beginnings, by Meles Zenawi.
Unpublished
Masters Dissertation: Erasmus University, Rotterdam,  Alex de Waal*
Alex de Waal (Alex.DeWaal@tufts.edu) is Executive Director of the World Peace Foundation at the Fletcher School, Tufts University.
Alex de WaalMeles did not hide his views, but neither did he ever fully present his theory of the ‘democratic developmental state’ to an international audience. Over nearly 25 years, I was fortunate to be able to discuss political economy with him regularly, including critiquing his incomplete and unpublished master's dissertation. During this time, his thinking evolved, but his basic principles and sensibilities remained constant. 
World leaders have lauded Meles' economic achievements without acknowledging their theoretical basis. Human rights organizations have decried his political record as though he were a routine despot with no agenda other than hanging on to power. Reviewing his writings on the developmental state, this essay shows the unity of his theory and practice. 


China's African Water Scramble
Daniel Nisman. www.huffingtonpost.com

MENA Region Intelligence Manager, Max Security Solutions
Co-authored by Jay Radzinski and Nimrod Asulin.
"He who rides the sea of the Nile must have sails woven of patience." So noted British novelist William Golding a century ago; and his saying has clearly taken root in Beijing today. Under the radar of the Western world, China has patiently established its influence among Africa's emerging powerhouses, setting its sights on the continent's most contested resource: The Nile River. Amidst the decline of Egypt and the rise of Ethiopia, China has managed to manipulate a long-brewing conflict between Africa's two major powers to its benefit, slowly replacing the West as the continent's new kingmaker.


Talk to Al Jazeera - Can Ethiopia and Eritrea finally find peace?
After decades of hostility between the two countries, Hailemariam Desalegn, Ethiopia's new prime minister, explains why he would be willing to talk to the Eritrean president. He also discusses his plans to move Ethiopia and the region forward.

(III) The Circular Journey in Search of Eritrea: “Hadnetna” from Sahel to the Sinai 
Yosief Ghebrehiwet

How did Eritrea get into this mess? Courtesy of http://asmarino.com

If there was no distance in between the worlds of the “colonizer” and the “colonized” to begin with to justify the revolution, the ghedli generation had to invent it, with all the horrible price the Eritrean people were made to pay to maintain such a fabricated distance. In the last five decades, the fight against gravity has been going on relentlessly: whenever the direction seemed to point to the starting point (the normal world of the people), an unusual violence was needed to straighten it out for the abnormal ghedli journey to continue.To prove that independence, as in separation, doesn’t necessarily lead to a good end, one need only point to the current sad state of Eritrea. And when it comes to the unity of a nation, if two (or more) major population groups that make up the nation don’t get along (so much so that they keep hampering each other’s freedom, security, prosperity, happiness and fulfillment in ways that are irreconcilable)


Eritrea/Uganda: Eritrean National Football Team Defects to Uganda
By Michel Arseneault, 3 December 2012 

Eritrea's entire national football team has defected while on a visit to Uganda, according to one of the players. The footballer, who spoke on condition of anonymity, told RFI that 17 footballers and the team doctor are hiding in Kampala. "Everybody has to stay in secure places because the Eritrean government is searching for us," he said. "The Eritrean embassy in Uganda are trying to find us." The team member said the group could make an asylum claim on Thursday. He said he had decided to flee Eritrea because of its many problems, citing the government of President Isaias Afeworki as "the main problem" and accusing it of failing to respect human rights and having a compulsory and extensive programme of military training.



GETTING AFRICAN BUSINESSES ONLINE
Africa Business Pages has launched a new program of providing free list-ings for African businesses

The latest quarterly statistics from the Communications Commission of Kenya, indicate that the number of Kenyans accessing the Internet daily stands at 10.2 million people, 18 percent above the previous quarter’s numbers. It is this growth in digital usage that one of the world’s leading African B2B portals, Africa Business Pages, has launched a digital platform for Africa’s Small and Medium Enterprises (SME), dubbed ‘Getting African Businesses Online’.  The unveiling of this initiative means African businesses will have the opportunity to create their own websites and develop an online presence, for free, under the sub domain http://directory.africa-business.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Lazio Region.

Note: The Egyptian Air Force is the 4th largest F-16 operator in the world, mustering about 195 F-16s of 220 ordered. Their overall fighter fleet is a mix of high-end F-16s and Mirage 2000s, low-end Chinese F-7s (MiG-21 copy) bought from the Chinese, a few F-4 Phantom II jets, and upgraded but very aged Soviet MiG-21s and French Mirage 5s


African Service Committee Special Seattle Event


May 31, 2014

Book Launching and Discussion on Contemporary Ethiopia

 

The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA) is proud to announce the launching of Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia’s book, Ethiopia: Democracy, Devolution of Power, and The Developmental State in Washington DC on June 28, 2014.

 

IDEA encourages all Ethiopians and scholars on Ethiopia in the Washington DC Metro Area to join the fascinating discussion on contemporary Ethiopia. Professor Haile Gerima will introduce the book signing ceremony and Dr. Araia will engage the audience in a lively and interactive intellectual discussion.

 

Venue: Sanfoka Video and Books, 2714 Georgia Ave, Washington DC 20001

Time: Saturday June 28 at 3 pm

TEACHERS COLLEGE | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
Vice President’s Office for Diversity and Community Affairs, Office of Alumni Affairs, African Alumni Club of Columbia University
A BOOK LAUNCH AND RECEPTION FOR
GHELAWDEWOS ARAIA, PH.D
A BOOK LAUNCH AND RECEPTION FOR
DR. GHELAWDEWOS ARAIA
FEATURING HIS BOOK:

International Tigray Festival 2014 in Tigray, July 31st to Aug. 6th.
Guest Registration Form - Please include all relevant information


Union of Tigreans in North America

ማሕበር ተጋሩ ሰሜን ኣሜሪካ



  

 

 

 

 

  




ኣባይ  በእርግጥ  ይገደባል


Radio snit January 26, 2014

Radio snit Professor Medhanye

Radio snit Sunday's program. January, 12, 2014

Radio snit Sunday's program.

January, 10, 2014

Radio snit Sunday's program.

January 5, 01, 2014


Radio snit Sunday's program.

December 31, 2013

Radio snit Sunday's program. 
December 22, 2013


Radio snit Sunday's program. 
December 14, 2013


Radio snit Sunday's program. 
December 8, 2013


        In memoriam
Professor Jemal Abdulkadir

Elias S Siraj, Ahmed Reja, and Solomon Tesfaye
On Saturday August 24th, 2013, the world diabetes community lost Professor Jemal Abdulkadir, a pioneer of diabetes care in his native country, Ethiopia and theAfrican continent.

Socialist wins seat on Seattle city council
November 16, 2013 

Seattle voters have elected a socialist to city council for the first time in modern history. Kshama Sawant, a member of the populist Occupy Seattle movement, ran on a platform of raising Washington State’s minimum wage to $15 and levying a “millionaire tax” to pay for mass transit and public education.


Ato Bekele Berhane’s Legacy will Live On

 It was devastating news on Wednesday, October 10, 2013, to learn that Ato Bekele Berhane, an alumni and one of the original founders of the Queen Sheba School, Adwa, Tigrai, Ethiopia, has passed away, surrounded by his brothers, sisters, children, and a number of friends.




Petition to Urge Representative Christopher Smith Stop his drive to introduce an Anti-Ethiopian Bill
(by Ethiopians for Peace and Development, Washington DC)


After graduation, I had the privilege of traveling to Mekelle, Ethiopia for an internship in medicine and dentistry


እንቅልፍ የት ኣባቱ!

ጠረንሽ ወረረኝ 

ምን ይሻለኛል


Radio Merhawit Streaming on the Internet

Courtesy of Tigray net

September 16, 2012 Sunday Program


Featured Article

Beyond Politics and Innuendo: Preserving Our Humanity and Salvaging Ethiopia from Moral Decadence 



The Legacy of Atse Yohannes IV  


Emperor Yohannes IV of Ethiopia

ATSE YOHANNES IV HIGH SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY


Atse Yohannes IV of Ethiopia crowned January 12 Born the son of Mercha the Shum of Tembien and his wife Woizero Silass Dimtsu (Amata Selassie) of Enderta, Dejazmatch Kassai could claim Solomonic blood through the line of his paternal grandmother 


 


 



 



Queen Sheba Schools Alumni Association and Friends - International is holding a fundraising event in Dallas Chapter





 


Security Council, by Vote of 13 in Favour, Adopts Resolution Reinforcing Sanctions Regime against Eritrea ‘Calibrated’ to Halt All Activities Destabilizing Region

Security Council Tightens Sanctions Regime on Somalia, Eritrea, Extending Mandate of Monitoring Group for 12 Months

Security Council Committee on Somalia and Eritrea Adds Two Individuals to List of Individuals and Entities

 




The Legend of the Great Drum (The “Negarit”)

By G.E.Gorfu


Views from our Ethiopia readers


Embassy Announces Winners of Four Freedoms Art Competition
U.S. Ambassador Booth
Announces Art Competition Awards of 100,000 Birr: Envisioning President Roosevelt's Four Freedoms Today


የኢትዮጵያ ፌዴራላዊ ዴሞክራሲያዊ መድረክ ካለፈው ምርጫ በኋላ ለመጀመሪያ ጊዜ እሁድ ዕለት መቀሌ ከተማ ውስጥ ሕዝባዊ ስብሰባ አካሄደ    


  ከአብራሃም ያየህ



እርምት ለሙሲ ፈልምና ለደራሲው ብረሃነ ኑጉሰ
ከአስገደ ገ/ስላሲ


አቶ ዘርአይ አስገዶም በሙስና ተነከሩ


የኢትዮጵያ ሕዝብ

እንዲያውቀ ከአስገደ ገ/ስላሲ


ያገረሽበት ታሪክ
ከአስገደ ገ/ስላሲ


ማነህ ባለተራ


Us embassy cables the-documents nuclear weapons


Question and Answer with G.E. Gorfu


Outbreak of Liver Disease in Ethiopia Tigrai Region

Amharic

 

In Tigringa   


  MP3


A book “Peace or War? Views on the Ethio-Eritrean Conflict”

Dr. Yohannes Kiros


 

 

 

 

 


  

            

      ሕልሚ ደርሁ!


TDA-NA DC Chapter is hosting a grand fund raising event


Ayder Memrial Library

Invites you to Fundraising

Saturday June 12, 2010


Older than Egypt is Ethiopia 
From distant past to the dawn of Islam, Gamal Nkrumah looks at the history of this African nation 

 

November 1, 2010 G. E. Gorfu

 

      እግ

        ጠላትህን ዕወቅ!

THROUGH MIDNIGHT
May 4, 2010 G. E. Gorfu


News

Eritrea desperate to undo UN sanctions
afrol News - Eritrea President Isaias Afewerki is on a diplomatic offensive to make the UN lift sanctions 

Eritrean rebels claim killing 11 government soldiers Source: East Africa Forum

Oxfam: Climate Change Devastating Ethiopian Rural Communities
April 23, 2010 Michael  VOA

Ethiopian opposition express discomfort over AU election observer mission

April 23, 2010 –APA/Afriqueavenir

Statement at the Conclusion of an IMF Mission to Ethiopia

Press Release No. 10/108  March 24, 2010

International Monetary and Financial Committee Statement

Twenty-First Meeting   April 24, 2010

  Aristotle-Philosophy

    Of   Politics III

 


Ayder Memorial Library Project fundraising event 


35th birthday of TPLF, Yekatit 11 Party in Minnesota


Kidan, Ethiopia

The Girl Effect

Eritrea Police Raid Church Service; Dozens Detained

Thursday, January 29, 2009 (10:02 am)

Prophet Muhammad and the culture of the oppressed

By: Nazim Baksh


    Iran Human Rights Documentation 

Gorfu

መገኘ አለበታ!

Aristotle and Politics II
G.E. Gorfu

   
ኦሪት

     Ferenge
  Amlaku 4,5,6,7 series

  Ferenj Amlaku I, 2,     series
      FETTERS OF LOVE

    

 
   
   
•    
Memories of student 

• 

•   

•     Bashai Awalom?

•     The Need for 

 

  By Ivan Simic   

War Trend Will Soon 
    January 28, 2009
World War II: 63 Years 
World War II: 63 

  Ivan Simic  
Millionaire? 

Georgia vs. Ossetia:

   Conflict to Major War

   Ivan Simic  August 11, 

Radovan Karadzic: One 

Deceptions of July 22,

Millionaire?  

•  Kosovo Brief

Alfred Nobel: 

By Tecola W. Hagos

EDITORIAL: Congratulations, President Barak   Obama, the 44th President of the United States of America January 19, 2009
Open Letter to the Brave Warriors of Ethiopia Returning Home From Somalia

By Tecola W. Hagos   January 5, 2009

 

From The Times February 5, 2009

Zimbabwe's MDC plan to extradite Mengistu Haile Mariam to Ethiopia


East Africa: UN Council Demands Eritrea Engage in Efforts to Resolve Dispute With Djibouti
14 January 2009

Et0126_2Vertical Ethiopia: Climbing Toward Possibility in the Horn of Africa

Right on the heels of our time with Surf Is Where You Find It author Gerry Lopez, we have more good book news to share with you this week.

    KELLY CLARKSON 

 

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