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"A man who was completely innocent, offered himself as a sacrifice for the good of others, including his enemies, and became the ransom of the world . It was a perfect act". Mahatma Gandhi 

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Young Senay Beyene who lost his life to eplilepsy at the tender age of 20.
This is to announce that the family and friends of Senay Bitta Beyene, who suddenly passed away at the age of 20 due to epilepsy on august 31, 2012 in Stockholm Sweden. A foundation has been constituted in his memory, Senay Epilepsy Support (Insamlingsstiftelse Senay Epilepsi Stöd) on the 7th of Dec. 2014. The main objectives o of this foundation is to support t children and others suffering from m epilepsy and carry out informational and educational work in Ethiopia as well as other related issues in cooperation with medical expertise and professionals.
Rest in peace and eternal love from all Bitta Beyene, Ribk ka Abreha, Feleg, communit and board members.


Ethiopia in first vote since Meles Zenawi's death
BBC

Hailemariam Desalegn on left, Debretsion Gebremikael (centre) and Tewodros Adhanom or rightEthiopians have been voting for a new parliament in the first election since the death of long-serving Prime Minister Meles Zenawi in 2012. The outgoing parliament has only one opposition MP. Mr Zenawi's successor Hailemariam Desalegn is expected to hold on to power.
Polls closed at 18:00 local time. 
No major irregularities were reported, election officials said. However, the opposition said their representatives were barred from some polling stations. Observers from the African Union issued an initial assessment to say the polls were conducted in a calm and peaceful manner.  Some preliminary results will be announced this week, the electoral board says. Full results are due next month. 


Election Eve Reality on the Ground and Possible Post-election Scenario in Ethiopia
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD May 22, 2015

However, smooth and civil debates in countries like Ethiopia with no prior democratic culture and some degree of tolerance amongst the fiercely competing political parties could be tricky. For all intents and purposes, Ethiopia’s current politics does not promise a transition to a full-fledged democracy because the latter requires a change of mindset on the part of the people, a thorough psychological preparedness on the part of ruling party and the opposition parties, and most importantly the establishment of robust democratic institutions, that are, for the most part, absent in Ethiopia. The absence of the latter institutions, however, should not be squarely put within the boundaries of the EPRDF or directly attributed to the ruling party, although arguably the Government and the ruling party should be held responsible, at least in the context of leadership, for the promotion of democratic culture. In the final analysis, however, all of us Ethiopians, especially intellectuals and professionals, should be held accountable for the delay or acceleration of the establishment of democracy in Ethiopia.


Ethiopia's economy to grow 10.5 percent in 2015/16: World Bank
ADDIS ABABA (Reuters) - Ethiopia's economy is expected to grow by 9.5 percent this fiscal year ending June before accelerating to 10.5 percent in 2015/16, the World Bank said on Friday, adding inflation will remain in single digits during this period. The ruling Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) has touted its economic achievements before Sunday's election, although no one doubts it will sweep to power again, as critics say it stifles any real opposition. There is just one opposition member of the outgoing parliament.
Lars Christian Moller, the World Bank's lead economist and program leader for Ethiopia, told Reuters that falling oil prices should help quicken Ethiopia's growth in 2015/16.


Civic Urban Revolt in Contemporary Ethiopia
Nahusenay Belay

The very objective of this short piece is to explore the politically ‘visible’, but academically overlooked issue of urban civic revolt in Ethiopia. The Ethiopian government is curious and cautious about this and the same is true to those who think and propagate orchestrating an urban civic revolt is a possibility. The simple answer is: playing according to the established ‘rules of the game’ and enhance ones capacity to influence the dynamics. There is no perfect democracy and the challenges of an infant democracy are obviously multi-dimensional. It has to be noted, however, that violence can only bred another wave of violence.


Why Africa must cancel Economic Agreements, Political and Military with France?
Per Dr. Mehenou Amouzou

A few months ago we published "Culture and Development in Africa". The intent of this publication is to analyze the causes of underdevelopment in Africa and how Africa could catch up by becoming a prosperous continent and not at the mercy of all predators. The topics that were discussed are: 
Culture encompassing social development; 
Culture, economic development resources; 
Culture, Democracy and Religion; 
Africa can become a continent of the future, prosperous and children need no longer take the risk of crossing the Mediterranean to be the sole bread-winner for many families in the continent. This phenomenon is all the more distressing that one third perished at sea, and another one third are treated inhumanely in camps and the final third of the survivors are undocumented citizens and therefore faces an uncertain future! 


Ethiopia Plans Export Hubs With $10 Billion Factory Parks 
By'William Davison

Ethiopia is targeting $1 billion of annual investment in industrial parks over the next decade to boost exports and make it Africa’s top manufacturer, a special adviser to Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn said. The government may invest half of the $10 billion needed for zones across the country that will house textile, leather, agro-processing and other labor-intensive factories, Arkebe Oqubay said in an interview in the capital, Addis Ababa. The International Finance Corp., the World Bank’s private lending arm, along with Chinese and European lenders and private-equity funds are interested in projects, he said.
“In terms of industrial development and manufacturing development, we want to put Ethiopia number one in Africa,” Arkebe said.


Global Tragedies of Neoliberalism: Lessons worth Critical Learning 
by Asghedom Ghebremichael, PhD 17 May 2015
The Ethiopian Scene

With a 2014 population of approximately 97,970,452 (increased from 2013’s estimate of 95,045,679), Ethiopia is the second largest country in the continent of Africa , after Nigeria. This population estimate is based on the most recent United Nations projections. Possessing untapped highly productive labor force of a young generation, a huge wealth of natural resources, and a glorious history Ethiopia’s future should be bright. The country is regarded as the Mother of Africa’s freedom. But, abject poverty has become enemy number one that must be defeated and be eradicated from the Ethiopian landscape. In Ethiopia, like in any other poor country, poverty is a multifaceted deprivation. Persistent poverty is a trap manifested through the horrors of: 


Mogous Abay

We have asked many times for your support to expose this hideous crime and many of you have written us with a sympathetic letter for which we are thankful. But the case remains hidden. It is very difficult to know how long for. We believe every body has moral obligation to support this case . Up and down the country all MEPs, MPs and Cllrs have been informed on several occasions but till to day no body has spoken about this injustice openly. The UK people has to know the whole history of this crime and the only way will be through an inquiry conducted by the home office or the Prime Minster's office. You can do this by writing to the Prime Minister David Cameron, the Home Secretary, Theresa May, the Communities and Local Government secretary, the justice secretary and the General secretary of UNISON. I believe this is premeditated murder and relates to Bow neighborhood in the London borough of Tower Hamlets where I was working in the housing department. As the attached letter from UNISON confirms it, my brother was murdered because of mistaken identity.  Many thanks Alemseged Abay


Ethiopians Rally Olympic-Style, Chip in on Bonds for Dam
By William Davison

A horse-drawn carriage festooned with balloons and Ethiopian flags stops in front of a crowd at a ramshackle football stadium. Two women in traditional white dresses pluck a gold trophy from the cart and place it on a stage inside a garland of red and white roses. Beneath is a computer-generated image of the $3.8 billion dam Ethiopia is building across the main tributary of the Nile River. The trophy celebrating what will be the world’s seventh-biggest hydropower plant, the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, has arrived at Debre Birhan town. It’s the latest stop in the African nation of almost 100 million people in an Olympic torch-style promotional tour.


A Saudi war fought with Eritrean troops?
By: Mohammad Abu Fares 8 May, 2015

Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Houthis, Eritrea, Asmara, Isaias Afwerki
Analysis: Saudi Arabia has been cosying up to Eritrea, leading to reports the African nation will join Senegal in offering troops for the war in Yemen, says Mohammad Abu Fares.
Eritrea could be the second non-Arab African nation to contribute troops to the Saudi-led alliance against Houthi rebels in Yemen. Eritrea's president Isaias Afwerki visited Riyadh last week to meet King Salman and other leading Saudi officials. This has led many to believe that Eritrea could follow Senegal's lead - the West African nation announced earlier this week that it would send 2,100 soldiers to join the Saudi alliance.


Development Finance and Debt Sustainability in Ethiopia: Lesson to
Sub-Saharan African Countries

By Teshome A1.(PhD), Assistant Professor, Friday, May 08, 2015
1. Introduction
Development is multi dimensional processes that required large amount of financial resources.
Economic theories have shown that financial resources are more important than natural resources
in the process of economic development (Teklu Kassu, D.K Mishra and Melesse Asefaw,
2014).The amount and the sources of development finance play major roles in realizing
sustainable economic development in developing countries. . There are two broad categories of
sources of development finance which know as internal and external sources of development
finance. The former sources of finance mainly relied on the domestic resource such as tax, nontax,
domestic loan. 


Despite executions, drowning, some Ethiopians still dream of Europe
AFP May 1, 2015
By Karim Lebhour 

Addis Ababa (AFP) - On the walls of homes in the poor Cherkos neighborhood of Ethiopia's capital, the portraits of "martyrs" killed in their attempt to enter Europe offer a grim warning. 
The murders of several Ethiopian Christians last month in Libya horrified Ethiopians and sparked global condemnation, including from Pope Francis who expressed his "great distress and sadness".
At least five of the victims out of the group of 28 migrants on the gruesome video were recognized as coming from this poor neighborhood in the heart of the Ethiopian capital and its tightly packed clusters of simple brick, tin roof buildings.
"We were about to leave, now we will wait a bit, but not too long," said one young man aged around 20, sitting with friends, all shocked by having watched the horrific executions on their mobile telephone


Strategies to combat and defeat the international menace of ISIS
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD May 3, 2015

Dedicated to the 30 Ethiopians who were shot and beheaded by ISIS in Libya on April 19, 2015
While the overall general trend of history could be reasonably predicted, history itself often comes up with relatively unfathomable phenomena, and we humans are caught at the crossroads and thresholds and rather become helpless. This might sound ironic but it happened many times in history every time societies encountered quandaries and conundrums, as well as social calamities manifested in the form of Nazism, Fascism, Jihad etc. In the above context, thus, the new ex machina of Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) or Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), would be one more surprise of history. Ex machina, is a positive attribute to a Godly appearance in religious tenets or a sudden appearance of a character in a drama that would provide solution to an insoluble difficult problem; it would be inappropriate to depict ISIS as ex machina in its literal sense, but I am using it only as “a sudden appearance of a phenomenon.” ISIS, far from providing solutions to problems, is in fact an international menace and global challenge. This menace should be combated and defeated.


'It's degrading,' says Ethiopian-Israeli soldier beaten by police
By Oren Liebermann, CNN

Jerusalem (CNN)—The Ethiopian Jewish soldier at the center of a viral beating video that has sparked protests across Israel says he supports the anti-racism demonstrations, but condemns the violent clashes that erupted. Cpl. Demas Fikadey, 21, told CNN he was a block away from his house in Holon, a suburb of Tel Aviv, when he tried to cross the street. Fikadey says an officer stopped him from crossing, then grabbed his bike and cell phone. Fikadey says he urged the police officer not to use force, but by then, another officer had joined in. The video shows the two officers push Fikadey to the ground and hold him down for approximately one minute before allowing him to stand up. The entire incident is caught on a nearby security camera, but the video has no sound. 


Obama Nominates Gayle Smith to Lead U.S.A.I.D.
By HELENE COOPERAPRIL 30, 2015 

WASHINGTON — President Obama nominated Gayle Smith, a senior White House official, on Thursday to be the next administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, administration officials said. If confirmed by the Senate, Ms. Smith, a longtime development and Africa specialist in the Clinton and Obama administrations, would succeed Dr. Rajiv Shah, who left the agency in February after five years on the job. Ms. Smith, 59, who is well-known in Washington development circles, would be responsible for leading the government’s response to humanitarian disasters like the earthquake in Nepal, the refugee crisis in Syria and the receding Ebola epidemic in West Africa, as well as managing the agency’s $20 billion budget.Ms. Smith spent 20 years in Africa — Ethiopia, Sudan and Kenya — first as a freelance journalist for the British Broadcasting Corporation, Reuters, The Associated Press and The Boston Globe, and then with nongovernmental groups. She is a co-founder of the Enough Project to end genocide.


The perilous journey migrants make to reach north Africa
30 April 2015 Last updated at 15:05 BST 

For migrants it is a dangerous journey to cross sub-Saharan Africa to reach the north African coast.
It is estimated that 100,000 migrants will go through the town of Agadez in Niger this year, higher than in 2014, putting their lives into the hands of smugglers. Some migrants will never make it, dying of thirst en route, or sold to militia for money. Our West Africa correspondent Thomas Fessy reports from Agadez. 


Ethiopians in Seattle Mourns (ISIL) Victims

Ethiopian Observer reporter

April 24, 2015 Hosted by Ethiopian Community Council (ECC) at Yesler Community Center mourns with joint Christian, Muslim and representatives of Nation nationalities of Ethiopian community and The Coalition of Immigrants, Refugees and Communities of Color (CIRCC serve  communities through annual candidate’s forum, educational workshops, grassroots organizing, youth programming, arts & civic engagement, and community & policy advocacy) for 30 Ethiopian and Eritrean Christians believed to have been killed by the Islamic State of Iraq in Libya. The apparent execution in a video released by ISIL murders, shown in footage last week on Sunday, have horrified Ethiopians in Seattle and sparked worldwide condemnation with great sorrow and sadness. Various speakers noted that the killing of the innocent people like animals is completely unacceptable, and inhuman.

The speakers noted it is the duty of all of us to expose and raise our voice to tell the world such barbaric deed had no place in any religion. Ethiopians in Seattle has condemned the Perpetuated killing of 30 Ethiopian and Eritrean Christians shown in a video released by (ISIL). The Ethiopian Community Council denounced the killings by ISIL as a "criminal" effort to create religious divisions among the Christian and Islam followers in Ethiopia. Throughout history Ethiopians have stood with our Muslim brothers/sisters shoulder to shoulder in peace and harmony. Their attempt to create havoc and mayhem and misuse of Islam religion has no place in Ethiopia. The 29-minute video, titled until, “There Came to Them Clear Evidence, appeared to be primarily aimed at offering religious justification for the targeting of Christians.  Seattle Residents of Ethiopian origin denounces the mass slaughter of Christians by the terror group ISIL depicts ‘Misuse of a noble religion'. Full report coming soon.


South Africa’s Incredible Amnesia: Forgetting Africa’s Contribution to the Liberation Struggle 
IDEA Viewpoint April 24, 2015 

We at the Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA) are disturbed by the ongoing xenophobic violence in South Africa against African immigrants. Hence we present this viewpoint and reflection so that our subscribers have a good flavor and understanding of the mob action against fellow Africans. We begin with a brief historical note and proceed in analyzing and critically examining the South African wave of anti-immigrant attacks. 
South Africans and other Africans may not know or remember the Massavana story because it took place so long ago, but that of Mandela and the struggle of liberation is a recent memory and South Africans are cognizant of the sympathy and solidarity extended to them by fellow Africans. At least the South African leadership knows too well about Mandela’s training in Ethiopia, the African National Congress (ANC) base camp in Tanzania, and the support they have enjoyed from Zambia, Zimbabwe, other SADC (Southern Africa Development Community) nations, as well as other Africans


Residents of Addis denounce the self-proclaimed IS
Addis Ababa, 22 April 2015 (WIC)
 

Residents of Addis Ababa held a huge rally against the self-proclaimed Islamic State (IS) here in Addis Ababa at Meskel Square.
Hundreds of thousands of people joined the march, denouncing the terrorist group for killing 28 Ethiopian migrants in Libya. Addressing the crowd, Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, said that the “killing is intend to create division among Ethiopians. However, Ethiopia’s long history of religious tolerance will not be hampered by this evil act.”
The slaughter of Ethiopians by the terrorist group has no religious base and it is intended against all human being, he said.


Grief Mixes With Anger Over Christian Ethiopian Deaths
By JACEY FORTINAPRIL 22, 2015 NY Times

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — In a downtrodden neighborhood called Cherkos, not far from the headquarters of the African Union, an olive-green tent stands as a tangible symbol of this nation’s grief. Two bereft families have gathered under its shade to mourn the loss of Eyasu Yikunoamlak and Balcha Belete, Ethiopian migrants who were killed in Libya by militants claiming to represent the Islamic State. “Eyasu was a good person who just wanted to make money to help our mother, who is very sick,” said the victim’s brother, Seyoum Yikunoamlak, as women in black scarves wailed around him. “He was a follower of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, and that is why they slaughtered him.


Ethiopians Shocked by Islamic State Killings
Ethiopian Christians killed by Islamic State were planning to take boat from Libya to Italy.

By ELIAS MESERET, Associated Press

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (AP) — Many in Ethiopia are reeling from the news that several Ethiopians were killed in Libya by the Islamic State group, which over the weekend released a video purporting to show the killings. The killings, which have shocked many in the predominantly Christian country, were condemned by Pope Francis and U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon
The victims were planning to go to Europe by boat from Libya but were captured and then killed by the Islamic extremists, said grieving family members and government officials. Ethiopia's government on Monday declared three days of mourning.


The Miracle of the Rising Anvil
We all know of the hammer that descends on the anvil, but who ever heard of an anvil that rises up to strike the hammer? That indeed, is a strange phenomenon. Dear reader, bear with me as I am about to recount my encounter with this amazing and incredible event for which I have no other explanation, except to say that it is indeed, a miracle. It was in the middle of winter so cold that while walking, one can often hear the chatter of the teeth of the person walking next to one. In fact, that was how I met Abba Gebre-Yohannes, a monk from Abune Gebre-Menfes-Kidus Monastery. We met as both of us were standing on the side of the street one late afternoon, waiting for the bus, when he casually said, “It is really cold, isn’t it?


Ethiopia: Site of the Ark of the Covenant?
By Colin Hancock and Daisy Carrington, for CNN

Mon April 20, 2015
Tigray, Ethiopia (CNN)—Ethiopia is often overlooked as a top destination for spiritual pilgrimage. This is an unfortunate oversight. 
The country is not just the cradle of civilization, it has played a significant role in the formation of many of the world's top religions. It is not only the location of the biblical kingdom of Sheba, it is currently believed by some to house the Ark of the Covenant. Click through the gallery above for a list of the country's top religious sites. 


Stop Xenophobia – Justice for the victims of xenophobia in South Africa !

 Zekarais Bekele

Once again we are witnessing another atrocious act of violence on immigrants in South Africa. Recently the number of violence and horrific act against immigrants in South Africa especially on immigrants from African nations has been off the chart. Witnesses and video footage on social media sites such as Face book, Twitter and You Tube shows how much the level violence is escalated. The situation is becoming out of control. 
This act of violence is happening again and again in South Africa. In short memory on May 12, 2008 a series of riots started in the township of Alexandra (in the north-eastern part of Johannesburg) when locals attacked migrants, killing two people and injuring 40 others.

Will you sign this petition? Click here:
http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/stop-xenophobia-justice?mailing_id=28743&source=s.icn.em.cr&%3Br_

by=9447883&r_by=953070


Ethiopia/Eritrea - The Great Illusion : Part VI Isaias Afwerki’s Colonial Question
By Worku Aberra 

Fictional stories serve useful purposes. Ethiopians tell teret, parables to convey a moral message; and Isaias, the EPLF, and its supporters have been telling the fiction that “Eritrea was a colony of Ethiopia” to sanction independence. Today, other ethnic fundamentalist groups, including the TPLF in the past, are doing the same. 
Isaias told the two interviewers that the struggle in Eritrea was an anti-colonial struggle. Even after 25 years of Eritrea’s independence, even after having achieved his cherished dream, even after being crowned the “founding father” of Eritrea, he still repeats the false claim. It seems that the fiction has become an article of faith, almost a dogma, for him and for members of the EPLF. 


Bad hosts
Why black South Africans are attacking foreign Africans but not foreign whites

 

The attacks on migrant shop owners in Durban this week reminds us the position of foreigner in South Africa is a complex one. After decades of isolation from the rest of the African continent, and the world, during apartheid, South Africa finally opened up to the rest of world in 1994. Under apartheid, South Africa’s immigration mirrored the narrow mindedness and prejudice of the National Party. Several laws made visiting or living in South Africa unpalatable to many. Particularly those of non-European descent. The violence against immigrants is “an expression of a terrible failure of memory by South Africans” who endured racial intolerance under apartheid, two South African foundations said. The foundations are named after anti-apartheid leader Nelson Mandela, who died in 2013, and Ahmed Kathrada, another campaigner against the white racist rule that ended in 1994.


South Africa grapples with outbreak of anti-immigrant violence 
April 15, 2015, 11:50 AM|Reporting from Johannesburg, South Africa

It began after the Zulu king, Goodwill Zwelithini, told his followers last month that foreigners in South Africa should pack up and leave. President Jacob Zuma’s eldest son, Edward, chimed in that foreigners were “taking over the country” in a “ticking time bomb.”. Then last week, violent attacks on immigrant shopkeepers in Durban townships exploded and have continued since. Dozens of immigrants in Johannesburg and other cities shuttered their shops Wednesday as anonymous cell phone text messages warned that Zulu people were coming to kill immigrants in neighborhoods with large migrant populations.


Africa's Next Hegemon Behind Ethiopia's Power Plays
By Harry Verhoeven 

In 1991, as the Cold War drew to an end, the only African country that had never been colonized by European imperialists was but a pale reflection of the Great Ethiopia that generations of the kingdom’s monarchs had pursued. A million people lay dead following two decades of civil war. Secessionist movements in the provinces clamored for self-determination. The economy was in tatters, and another catastrophic famine loomed. The world came to associate Ethiopia with images hoards of starving children, and the country’s regional and domestic decline opened questions about its very survival. Ethiopia has come a long way since the dark days of a quarter-century ago. Its resurgence, domestically and internationally, is unmistakable. Never have so many Ethiopians had so much reason to be optimistic and confident about the future. The Ethiopian vision of a Nile Basin where resources no longer lead to zero-sum competition and violent (proxy) wars, but rather to joint strategies to tackle poverty, unemployment, and climate change deserves wide-ranging support. Simultaneously, however, Ethiopia’s rulers know that they will face a long, uphill struggle to persuade their neighbours of their good intentions: 


Ethiopian Airlines among the top 10 most dependable airlines in the world

 

Ethiopian Airlines, Africa's largest and most profitable airline, has been ranked as the 6th most dependable airlines in the world according to CBS news. With a fleet size of 76 aircraft and more than 100 destinations , 81 of them internationally, Ethiopia's flag carrier has an on-time record of 71% and is ranked as the 6th most dependable airlines in the world.  Ethiopian flies to more destinations in Africa than any other airline in the world and it is Africa's dominant airline in Asia, flying to 21 cities in Asia including the Middle East and Gulf. The most dependable airline in the ranking is Qatar Airways followed by Emirates and China Eastern. Singaopre Airlines is ranked 4th and China Southern Airlines 5th. You can see the complete list on CBC News


Ethiopia 5th largest source of Black Immigrants in America
A Rising Share of the U.S. Black Population Is Foreign Born

Source: Pew Research
A record 3.8 million black immigrants live in the United States today, more than four times the number in 1980, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data. Black immigrants now account for 8.7% of the nation’s black population, nearly triple their share in 1980. 


Ethiopia, risen from the ashes

Irish Times
A safe country for tourists, well managed with a young educated workforce and a culture that runs much deeper than old headlines suggest. I’m crazy about Ethiopia. It’s exciting and elegant and stuffed full of history and drama. It offers vast distances between its remarkable tourist sites so, for a traveler like me who wants to get lost in the journey, it’s a fascinating place to visit and one that’s rapidly changing. It’s six years since my last trip here and change is everywhere. 


AFRICA BUSINESS-Foreign brewers battle for Ethiopia's beer drinkers
* Entry of drinks firms helping to transform business landscape
* Competition has driven down beer prices, improved supply
* Government keeps foreigners away from telecoms, banks
By Aaron Maasho and Edmund Blai


57 Peace Corps Volunteers Sworn in at U.S. Embassy in Ethiopia
US Embassy

Addis Ababa, April 3, 2015 – Ambassador Patricia M. Haslach administered the oath of service to 57 new Peace Corps Volunteers at the U.S. Embassy in Addis Ababa today. 33 of these Volunteers will be working within Peace Corps Ethiopia’s Community Health and HIV Project while the remaining 24 will be working within the its Environment Project. With this new group there are now 223 Peace Corps Volunteers in Ethiopia
.


Perspectives on the Declaration of Principles regarding the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam
Minga Negash, Seid Hassan, Mammo Muchie and Abu Girma1
I. Introduction
On March 23, 2015, Egypt, Ethiopia and the Sudan signed a declaration of principles on the Grand
Ethiopian Renaissance Dam2 (GERD). Since then, an intense debate has been going on regarding
the modalities and core principles which were spelled out in the Declaration. Unfortunately, the
principles contained in the Declaration have invited unhealthy rhetoric, particularly within Egypt,
Ethiopia and among the Ethiopian diaspora. There are two fundamental reasons for the negative
discourses. The first one involves the non‐cooperative, 



Revitalizing Ethiopia's Manufacturing Enterprises through the Japanese Production Management Strategy
by Asayehgn Desta

Currently, the Ethiopian manufacturers are at a disadvantage in the international market due to the preponderance of unskilled human resources, the scarcity of capital and differentiated management tools, and the lack of knowledge-based technology. The major span of the book entitled Revitalizing Ethiopia's Manufacturing Enterprises through the Japanese Production Management Strategy "Kaizen": A Critical Analysis explores in detail how a number of public and private enterprises in contemporary Ethiopia are in the process of discarding the Benchmarking process and the Business Process Reengineering techniques and redesigning their manufacturing and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) institutions to apply the Japanese Kaizen strategy in order to continuously improve their manpower, quality, and productivity of their products and services. 


Ethiopia Should Allow Free Press and Legitimate Dissent to Flourish 
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD March 16, 2015

free-press-2014The concern of the lack thereof of free press and by extension democracy in Ethiopia is the concern of all Ethiopians who genuinely aspire to witness the establishment of a democratic culture in their country. The question pertaining to free press is not forwarded by me alone; a lot of Ethiopians, including Tewodros Abebe, have raised it. In a recent opinion posted in the Washington Post, Tewodros argues, “If the government of Ethiopia is concerned for its citizens, as a spokesman asserted in a February 13 letter [“The Ethiopian government’s duty is to protect all of its citizens”], it should respect the rights and views of journalists and civilians who oppose its policies. It is repressive to block popular web sites and broadcasts such as the Voice of America that provide an alternative to government-controlled media… 


For Immediate Use
•Eritrean refugees kidnapped, tortured and ransomed in Sinai desert
The Sound of Torture is a haunting, multi-award-winning documentary about the plight of Eritrean refugees.

In the last decade, more than 300 000 Eritreans have fled the military dictatorship in their homeland, despite a ‘shoot to kill’ policy on the borders. They are followed by an estimated 3 000 every month.
Since 2006, when Europe closed its borders to Africans seeking asylum, more and more Eritreans have sought refuge in Israel, reachable by land via the Sinai desert.
In 2009, Bedouin smugglers in the Sinai desert started kidnapping, torturing and ransoming these refugees.
The Sound of Torture follows Meron Estefanos, an Eritrean journalist living in Sweden. She broadcasts a weekly programme on Radio Erena called Voices of Eritrean Refugees. Meron says, “In this radio programme, we give voice to those in the torture camp and to those who are trying to set them free.”


  http://aigaforum.com/events/TPLF-at-40-Tsadkan.php


Ayele Bekerie, PhD
Adwa, Ethiopia (TADIAS) –119 years ago, on March 1, 1896, at the Battle of Adwa, the unexpected happened. Ethiopia, an African country, defeated Italy, a European country. The defeat was decisive and the victory was permanent. More than 100,000 Ethiopian troops, who were led by Emperor Menelik II, were mobilized from all corners of the country and marched to victory at the battle that lasted less than half-a-day. The victory was so decisive, according to Fitawrari Tekle Hawariat, the 20,000 Italian and their ‘native’ soldiers were rushing to surrender and to be declared prisoners of war.


Spirit vs. War-machine: A Patriotic Resistance to Italian Occupation of Ethiopia (1936-1941)
Aregawi Berhe (PhD)

Introduction
For the second time in forty years, a European power, Italy invaded Ethiopia in 1935. Until this time, Ethiopia was a traditional polity with a predominantly feudal socio-political system, while Italy was an industrialized nation under the Fascist regime of Benito Mussolini. The invasion was conducted with the most advanced military organization and hardware -vast killing machine-against a spirited people of an old nation. In defiance of the occupation that ensued, the Ethiopians were engaged for five years in a multi-dimensional ‘patriotic resistance’ to drive the invaders out of their country, while the Ethiopian Emperor, Haile Selassie was engaged in an outmatched diplomatic struggle from exile.


The legend of the great Ethiopian drum the "Negarit”
By G. E. Gorfu

February 24, 2015

Baobab tree or in Dima in Tigrigna is a huge tree found throughout Ethiopia"I hid in its wet hollowed trunk, used it for liquid and shelter. I called it mother. It stood strong against the sun with branches spread yards beyond its bulging womb. I slept beneath oblong fruit and knew the promise of food." (Excerpt from the "The baobab tree", 1996 by Susan Hahn) The baobab tree (Adansonia digitata) is known as ድማ (dima) in Tigrigna or ባምባ (bamba) in Amharic.


ETHIOPIA IS TOO BIG TO FAIL

Cyber Politicians’ Bad Omen & Critique on the Doomsday Scenario of Ethiopia

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD                             February 21, 2015

 First and foremost let me make my position crystal clear why I decided to write this piece. I am not affiliated to any political organization nor am I interested to address any party, governing elite, or government in relation to this essay. I see myself as an independent scholar who advances a modicum of advocacy on behalf of Ethiopia, and I would be more than willing to perform as a spokesperson for my country. As the subtitle of this essay implies, I am critiquing the recent video clip entitled US Policy: Ethiopia A Failed State1 that has been circulating among Ethiopians in the Diaspora.  I am perplexed and flabbergasted by the contents of the narrative of the video surrounding a pending disaster for Ethiopia, and while I am not interested in totally refuting what has been presented in the video, I am however disappointed by the egregious negligence and exclusion of the Ethiopian people, the ultimate force who play a pivotal role in determining the fate of Ethiopia. Moreover, the video completely ignores the greatness of Ethiopia that I will address later in order to reinforce my thesis of ‘Ethiopia, too big a nation to fail’.  


The Miracle of the Rising Anvil
We all know of the hammer that descends on the anvil, but who ever heard of an anvil that rises up to strike the hammer? That indeed, is a strange phenomenon. Dear reader, bear with me as I am about to recount my encounter with this amazing and incredible event for which I have no other explanation, except to say that it is indeed, a miracle.


Ethiopia bets on grand projects in drive for industrial power
By Edmund Blair and Aaron Maasho

ADDIS ABABA (Reuters) - Chinese workers mingle with Ethiopians putting the finishing touches to a metro line that cuts through Addis Ababa, one of a series of grand state infrastructure projects that Ethiopia hopes will help it mimic Asia's industrial rise. Brought to its knees by "Red Terror" communist purges in the 1970s and famine in the 1980s, Ethiopia has been transformed in the last quarter century, becoming one of Africa's fastest-growing economies. 
At the heart of the state's "Growth and Transformation Plan" are railway, road and dam projects to give the landlocked nation cheap power and reliable transport, as well as the metro line - the first urban light railway network in Sub-Saharan Africa. "This is the future," said Abate Yaye, 27, from the poor south as he helped complete the $475 million system being built by China Railway Engineering Corp, much of it on concrete stilts to keep it above the crowded streets of an expanding capital.


An encounter with one of the marvels of our nature The Erta Ale constant lava sea of Afar-Ethiopia
Yohannes Kiros, Dr.

The Ethiopian landscape is endowed with awesome nature with variations in high altitudes and sinks, ranging from zones with high plateau and mountain ranges, intermediate zones to lowlands. It is a mesmerizing experience to discover places, where we normally do not pay attention to or even bother about. We seldom venture outside large cities and towns to investigate our surroundings. This is especially the case for the diaspora Ethiopians or Ethiopians living in the country, who are not used to internal tourism during their weekends and holidays.  One of the most beautiful and exciting places to visit is one of the world’s active volcanoes Erta Ale or the “smoking mountain” as it is called by the Afars of Ethiopia. This is a unique creation of our mother nature, where the magma chamber continuously releases a sea of lava from within the deep crater. It now and then spews its natural “fireworks” one to two meters high, the lava flowing and out-flowing within the crater 10 meters deep, while the visitors standing on the edge after hours of trekking bustle to take photos and videos clips of this magnificent display (see below Video)


Obituary: Ato Nega Woldeslassie.

A well-known Sport Journalist who contributed a lot to Ethiopian sport Federation, Ato Nega Woldeslassie passed away at age of 78 on February 5 2015 in Montreal Canada after a brief illness. He was born in Adwa and worked as Sport Journalist in the Ministry of Information of Ethiopia for over 20 Years before he moved to Canada. He was a father of three. His family and friends thank to those who comforted and encouraged them.
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(Book Review) Third World Colonialism and Strategies of Liberation: Eritrea and 
East Timor Compared Third World Colonialism and Strategies of Liberation: Eritrea and East Timor Compared New York: Cambridge University Press. 348 pages. ISBN 978-1-107-03123-4. $79.20

 Hardback. Awet Tewelde Weldemichael. 2013.Third World Colonialism and Strategies of Liberation
 is a comparative case study of the liberation strategies in Eritrea and East Timor using interviews with key actors, United Nations (UN) documents, government and nongovernmental materials, and scholarly publications. Through a historical examination of Eritrea’s and East Timor’s respective struggles for independence from Ethiopia and Indonesia, the book challenges the Western- and state-centric notions of colonial-ism, grand strategy, and terrorism. It also answers why, despite similar circumstances of decolonization from Western countries and secondary colonization by its adjacent neighbors, Eritrea and East Timor undertook divergent pathways toward independence and, subsequently, different forms of governance. In doing so, the book aims to contribute to a greater understanding of the peace prospects in the Horn of Africa and Southeast Asia. 


Can Ethiopia’s Resource Wealth Contribute to its Growth and Transformation?
January 26, 2015

ADDIS ABABA, January 26, 2015 – Ethiopia has averaged a 10.7% economic growth rate over the last 10 years, more than double the annual average of countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, which was around 5.2%. However, despite having a huge potential to contribute to Ethiopia’s economy, the development of oil, gas, and mineral resources are not among the key drivers of the country’s growth.  Although the country has geological potential for the discovery of new, sizeable oil, gas and mineral deposits, most of its extractive industry is still in its infancy stage. Currently, there is one large-scale gold mine in operation, while a growing number of large mining projects are under development and exploration for oil and natural gas is intensifying after significant discoveries in neighboring countries. Ethiopia also has an extensive and unique artisanal mining sector; the government estimates there are around 1 million miners, making it an important source of job creation, and an important source of foreign currency. 


Experts Rank Ethiopia's Coffee Among Best 
Marthe van der Wolf January 21, 2015 10:43 AM 

ADDIS ABABA— 
Ethiopia’s coffee has been ranked as the best in the world by an international group of coffee connoisseurs. Not surprisingly, coffee is a top export for the country. But at home it is a source of pride. International coffee experts travel the world to find the best tasting cup. They keep coming back to Ethiopia, where importers like Morton Wennersgaard say the climate produces quality coffee beans.


Poverty in Ethiopia Down 33 Percent Since 2000
January 20, 2015

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia January 20, 2015- Agricultural growth was the main driver of poverty reduction in Ethiopia since 2000, according to the World Bank Group’s latest Poverty Assessment. Poverty in Ethiopia fell from 44 percent in 2000 to 30 percent in 2011, which translated to a 33 percent reduction in the share of people living in poverty. This decline was underpinned by high and consistent economic growth.  Since 2005, agricultural growth has been responsible for a reduction in poverty of 4 percent a year, suggesting that the agricultural growth strategy pursued by the Government of Ethiopia has paid off. High food prices and good weather ensured that increased use of fertilizer was translated into higher incomes for poor farmers with access to markets. Government spending on basic services and effective rural safety nets has also helped the least well-off in Ethiopia. The Productive Safety Net Program alone has pushed 1.5 million people out of poverty.


UNESCO Should Recognize Ethiopian Epiphany as Intangible Cultural Heritage 
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD January 24, 2015 

UNESCO has already recognized Ethiopia’s most popular Meskel festival (the founding of the True Cross holiday) as one of the world’s intangible heritages and Ethiopians were appreciative of the constructive undertaking rendered by the UN agency for education, science, and culture. There is no doubt that Ethiopians would be more appreciative if UNESCO recognizes Timket (Ethiopian epiphany), which is as popular as Meskel, as yet another intangible Ethiopian heritage.
The faithful Ethiopians, thousands upon thousands of them, will converge near a body of water or Timkete-Bahir (pool, river, stream, or artificial fountain) to observer the celebration of the divine-liturgy, as early as 2 am in the morning. On the 18th of January (known as Kerem or eve of epiphany) the faithful have already taken their spaces around the water and they will not return home until the real celebration takes place on the 19th of January every year (or on the 20th of January on a leap year).



The Historic Ethiopian-Egyptian Renewed Diplomacy and Cooperation

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD                                                            January 12, 2015


I am gratified to witness the renewed Ethiopian-Egyptian diplomacy and cooperation after much turbulence, mistrust, and bellicose political climate that have griped the two African nations for decades. To be sure, it was Egypt that had promoted animus belligerendi (a near war attitude) against Ethiopia since the days of Emperor Haile Selassie. Now, thanks to the wise leadership of President Field Marshall Abdel Fatah el-Sisi and the pragmatic vision of the Egyptian people, Egypt has completely reversed its old policy and enhanced a friendly foreign policy toward Ethiopia. Ethiopia, on the other hand, had advanced a more conciliatory and compromise d’arbitrage (resolving disputes peacefully) policy toward Egypt, but finally, so it looks, the Ethiopian patience paid off.


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Ethiopian Observer editors believed readers deserve to read different opinions, we are not specialized in singling out any forum of political organization. The views and opinions of the authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect Ethioobserver position. Ethioobserver  doesn't exercise any editorial control over the information therein.

Dear Ethiopians, By Belay Fekadu 

Despite having the opportunity of ruling our country for the last 24 years--albeit by force—the government is an unfortunate regime that has been unable to guarantee good governance, justice, democratic and human rights for which it had supposedly struggled in the name of the people. The fact of the matter is that, the Ethiopian government chooses to repress than listen to the people. (As has been said often, EPRDF has a mouth but does not have the ears nor will of the people). We should not allow shiny buildings nor instant created multimillionaires to help us be bling with what is taking place in Ethiopia. 


The role of the media in …….”Unity in diversity”

Recently, I wrote an article on Mr. Gebru’ s book to contribute to the ongoing discussion on Ethiopia’s unity.  Gebru is a courageous fighter who came forward with proposed solution for the country he loves against all odds.  I heard Mr. Gebru’s interview in various media outlets and I salute the behavior he presented and the way he approached the questions. He is outspoken, matured person who handled all questions thrown at him unlike Aboy Sbihat’s fierce reaction to the publication of book and the issues. Even though, Sebhat was not a stranger for his controversial comments in the past, the interview he made commenting on this book was full of inconsistency and untrustworthy. He questioned Gebru on motive for publishing the book.


Oakland Institute’s efforts to damage Ethiopia’s development policies: a comment

(MoFA) 12-26-14 In the 1980s, Ethiopia, with images of starving Ethiopian children filling the Western media, became a symbol of humanitarian need.  Subsequently, this was twisted into a representation of an incompetent African government dependent upon wasteful foreign aid and disinterested in the suffering of its people.  These conveniently simplistic journalistic images were never very accurate. Today, they are totally wrong.


Convergence or Divergence?...  A political consensus on Mr. Gebru’ s Book

I read the book thoroughly in some cases repetitively to grasp every bit of information on it. There is no doubt; it is well-written book which adds a lot to our knowledge of the past how the country went through the bad days.  Mr. Gebru is a fighter who gave his whole precious life for the peoples’ cause.  He is a selfless and never tried to accumulate wealth for his personal benefit.  He is courageous to come forward to the public for judgment by admitting mistakes done in the past. He criticizes himself at center and blamed the organization who loves for the blunders and mistakes done during and after the struggle. This is a book that every citizen has to read and have fresh discussion on the issues.  


Sovereignty and Democracy in Ethiopia: A Reflection on Gebru Asrat’s Book
Reviewed by Desta, Asayehgn, Ph.D. Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Barowsky School of Business, Dominican University of California 

Over the past forty years, we have been hearing and reading a lot about the Tigrai People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) which dismantled the inhuman and atrocious Military dictatorship that ruled Ethiopia from 1974 to 1991. It was not only highly skilled in military operations but was visionary.  The impression that was widely circulated was that when the TPLF came to power it would protect Ethiopia’s sovereignty, adhere to the rules of law and ensure that equity and social justice would prevail , and  above all democracy would  be  the norm of Ethiopian society. 


The Unification of Ethiopia & Djibouti will be of Paramount Historical Significance  

                                    Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

December 17, 2014


The unification of Ethiopia and Djibouti would be a historical reaffirmation of the genetic linkage of the two peoples. I argue that the peoples of Ethiopia and Djibouti are genetically and historically inextricably linked together, not only to imply that their respective countries are geo-politically intertwined, but also to undergird the common heritage, historical experiences, the oneness of cultural ethos, same language, and linguistic semiotics shared by the two peoples on either side of the Ethiopia-Djibouti border. The two main ethnic groups that make up Djibouti are the Afar and Issa, whose ancestral homes are in Ethiopia. Wherever they may be, all Afar people claim Awsa, Ethiopia as the birthplace of their ancestors. Likewise, all Issa (a Somali clan) strongly believe that their original home is Ugaz (in greater Dire Dawa, Ethiopia).  


Ethiopia’s rapid growth: Miracle or mirage?
December 14 2014 at 10:42am
By William Gumede Source: Independent

Ethiopia, like many of Africa’s new growing economies, began achieving high growth rates from a low base, writes William Gumede.Thirty years ago, in 1984, Ethiopia was plunged into a terrifying famine, with hundreds of thousands starving to death and the economy in freefall. For about 10 years, the country has notched up double-digit economic growth rates. The average annual rate in the past 10 years has been 10.9 percent, according to figures from the African Development Bank. By contrast, other sub-Saharan African economies grew 5.4 percent on average in the same period. By the end of the 2012-13 fiscal year, Ethiopia’s economy had grown by 9.7 percent, according to the 2014 Economic Report on Africa from the UN Economic Commission for Africa. This year it will probably show bumper growth.


Touching documentary Out of 30 adopted Ethiopians, 9 of them are homeless in Seattle 

American Journalist Dan Rather has produced a documentary - "Unwanted in America" - which highlights how nine out of 30 children adopted from Ethiopia ended up homeless in the streets of Seattle. The documentary is heartbreaking for all fellow human beings, let alone Ethiopians. The documentary should serve those of us living in Seattle as a wakeup call to stop the crime against innocent children.

We can’t be Silent on the Reality Surrounding Abused Ethiopian Adoptees: Appeal to Diaspora Ethiopia & The Ethiopian Government

December 13, 2014


I want to die in my own country; I don’t want to die in somebody’s country

Abey, Ethiopian homeless in Seattle, Washington

Children with no voice

Pastor Berhanu Seyoum, Mekane Iyesus Ethiopian Church, Seattle, Washington

The Dan Rather video clip on abused adoptees and subsequent homeless Ethiopian teenagers in Seattle, Washington is a wakeup call for all of us Ethiopians. After exchange of ideas and information and discussing the adoption enigma in some detail, we at the Ethiopian Observer and the Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA) have decided to take a more proactive position on the problem of illegal human trafficking and adoption of apparently orphan Ethiopian children, and use this opportunity to call upon all Ethiopians in the Diaspora and the Ethiopian Government to come up with some novel solution to this invidious problem.



Kidnapped, raped and left for dead: who will protect Ethiopia's girls? 
The Guardian

One day in early October, Hanna Lalango, 16, did not return from school to her home in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, at the usual time. Her father Lalongo Hayesso was worried about his youngest daughter. “We waited for her at her usual time … but we had to wait for 11 days to hear that she had been abandoned on the street. She was incapacitated and couldn’t even get up,” said Hayesso. His daughter had been abducted, gang-raped and left for dead. Hanna was not able to get to hospital until 12 days after her attack, where she was treated for traumatic gynaecological fistula and other injuries. She died on 1 November.


African Diaspora: Come Back with Glory or Don’t Come Back At All!
By: Mawuna Remarque KOUTONIN

Africans in diaspora must understand that a Lizard in US or UK can not suddenly become an Alligator in Nigeria or Kenya, just because their plane have just landed from NY or London!
If you are a returnee who have to compete with locals for job, business or attention, you’ll face an unspoken resentment of returnees, which will translate into many forms of ostracism or rejection.
People coming from human zoos (Europe, USA, etc) will be shocked because it’s not a zoo here. You have no one who is responsible for you, guard you, or give you a list of things not to eat or to drink. You have to constantly use 100% of your native survival instincts and trust them


Annotated Bibliography of New and Noteworthy Books on Ethiopia Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

Travel: Ethiopia Rocks
By Aaron Mashoo 

Reuters
Addis Ababa - When Scottish explorer James Bruce published a five-volume work in 1790 about his search in Ethiopia for the source of the Nile, European readers dismissed his account of ancient churches and castles – surely no such thing existed in the heart of Africa. Fast-forward to this year and Solomon Tadesse sometimes feels he faces similar preconceptions as he seeks to attract tourists three decades after images of famine and communist purges filled TV screens and shaped the world’s view for a generation. Yet Solomon’s Ethiopian Tourism Organization is making headway in the battle to change attitudes. Visitor numbers have risen 12 percent a year in the past decade to reach 600 000 this year. His target next year is one million.


Ethiopia Completes Debut Dollar Bond Sale
Landmark Deal Caps a Record Year for Frontier Market Debt Issuance
By Ben Edwards
The Wall Street Journal

Ethiopia completed its debut dollar bond sale on Thursday, capping off a record year for frontier market debt issuance. The 10-year bond priced to yield 6.625% and raised $1 billion, according to one of the banks working on the deal. Investors said demand for the bond had reached about $2 billion. The deal is another landmark sale for Africa, having seen a bumper $2 billion debut issue from Kenya in June—one of the largest ever first-time sales from the region. “We’re running out of new names that can issue,” said Kevin Daly, a fund manager at Aberdeen Asset Management in London, adding that Ethiopia is the poorest country on a per-capita basis that has issued international bonds. Ahmed Salim, an analyst at advisory firm Teneo Intelligence, said the interest in the bond wasn’t surprising given that Ethiopia is one of the fastest-growing economies in sub-Saharan Africa.
Gross domestic product growth hit an estimated 8.2% this year, according to the International Monetary Fund. Ethiopia is rated B1 by Moody’s Investors Service and B by Standard & Poor’s Corp. and Fitch Ratings, four and five levels below investment grade, respectively.
Deutsche Bank and J.P. Morgan were managing the bond sale.


Studies on Contemporary Ethiopian Social Issues
Ghelawedwos Araia, PhD
Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA)
December 1, 2014

Dedicated to Hanna Lalango ለ ሃና ላላንጎ መታሰብያ
This scholarly article on Ethiopian social issues attempts to fill a lacuna in Ethiopian contemporary social studies with particular focus on social ills that have proliferated in Ethiopia as of recent but ironically underreported by the Ethiopian media. Social problems, including crimes, are not unique to Ethiopia and they are apt to develop, if not mushroom, especially in nascent expanding urban centers. However, we Ethiopians, and especially intellectuals, have historical responsibility to research and study the social problems and influence public policy for the sole purpose of overcoming the problems.


Number of Eritreans seeking asylum in Europe soars over figures for last year
News Stories, 14 November 2014

© UNHCR/A.D'Amato
Two young Eritreans wait to board a commercial ferry at Samos Island, Greece. Growing numbers of Eritreans are seeking asylum in Europe.
GENEVA, November 14 (UNHCR) – The UN refugee agency on Friday said the number of asylum-seekers in Europe from Eritrea over the first 10 months of this year has risen threefold compared to the same period in 2013. In Ethiopia and Sudan, neighboring Eritrea, the number of Eritrean refugees has also increased sharply."So far this year, nearly 37,000 Eritreans have sought refuge in Europe, compared to almost 13,000 during the same period last year. Most asylum requests have been lodged in Sweden, Germany and Switzerland, with the vast majority of the Eritreans having arrived by boat across the Mediterranean," UNHCR spokesman Adrian Edwards told journalists in Geneva.


We can learn a few lessons from Ethiopia
Source: News Day

Ethiopia has not been a good example over the decades despite priding itself of not having been colonised.

DEVELOP ME WITH TAPIWA GOMO
There are number of reasons why the world may not have fairly judged Ethiopia, some of which include the 1984 drought, the incompatibility of their governance to those of the generally acceptable standards. As much as the Western intellectual machinery has imposed the lenses through which we view governance systems, an unquestioned conclusion has been imposed on them and that such governance system is responsible for the high poverty and suffering of Ethiopians. Western scholarship teaches us that leaders must leave office at a certain period of time to allow the country to develop.


Ali Mazrui, Scholar of Africa Who Divided U.S. Audiences, Dies at 81
By DOUGLAS MARTINOCT. 20, 2014 

Ali Mazrui, a scholar and prolific author who set off a tsunami of criticism in 1986 by writing and hosting “The Africans: A Triple Heritage,” a public television series that culminated in what seemed to be an endorsement of African nations’ acquiring nuclear weapons, died on Oct. 12 at his home in Vestal, N.Y. He was 81. His family announced the death without specifying a cause.
Uhuru Kenyatta, the president of Kenya, where Professor Mazrui was born, said at the time of his death that he was “a towering academician whose intellectual contributions played a major role in shaping African scholarship.”“The Africans,” a nine-part series that was originally broadcast by the BBC and later shown on PBS, portrayed Africa as having been defined by the interplay of indigenous, Islamic and Western influences. Professor Mazrui had acquired the perspective by growing up speaking Swahili, practicing Islam and attending an English-speaking school in Mombasa, Kenya. “My three worlds overlapped,” he said in the interview with The Times.


Published on Oct 31, 2014 
Round table discussion with Former TPLF executive Leader, Tigrai Governor and current member and Leader of ARENA a Legal Opposition group in Ethiopia. The discussion was held via a tele conference and was mainly about his latest book "Luelawinet and Democracy in Ethiopia". The interview is presented in a three part series and mainly concentrates on the handling of the Eritrea issue, Democracy in Ethiopia and the challenges that exist today and on Gebru's account about TPLF/EPRDF revolutionary democracy shortcomings as far as building democracy and good governance in Ethiopia. (Source: Aigaforum.com)

Spike in Eritreans fleeing into Ethiopia
More than 200 risk their lives every day, UN says, crossing a heavily-fortified border between arch enemy states.
AFP
Over 200 Eritrean refugees are crossing the heavily fortified and dangerous border into neighbouring Ethiopia daily, the United Nations said in a report noting a "spike" in those fleeing.
Tens of thousands of people have fled the Horn of Africa country, escaping open-ended conscription and the iron-grip rule of President Issaias Afewerki, with many continuing northwards to brave the often harrowing journey towards Europe.


Is Ethiopia’s Sovereign Debt Sustainable? 
By Seid Hassan, Minga Negash, Tesfaye T. Lemma and Abu Girma Moges 

Although sovereign debts have usually been at the root of many of the financial crises in recent history, scholars allude to the complexity of assessing the sustainability of a nation’s public debt and hence the lack of consensus on the most apt approach. The financial economics literature identifies various models and proxies that could be used for the purpose of gauging the sustainability of a country’s debt. The commonly used benchmarks to measure the sustainability of a country’s debt include, inter alia, a country’s: (i) debt to GDP ratio; (ii) debt to export ratio; (iii) debt to revenue ratio; (iv) trade balance; (v) the primary fiscal gap; (vi) debt service to budgetary revenue; (vii) interest to GDP ratio; and (viii) interest to domestic budgetary revenue. We make a number of important observations with respect to the sustainability of Ethiopia’s public debt by invoking relevant benchmarks and other contextual variables.


Regreening program to restore one-sixth of Ethiopia's land 
Tree and shrub-planting program has transformed degraded and deforested land across Africa, with Ethiopia planning to restore a further 15m hectares by 2030

Fifteen years years ago the villages around Abraha Weatsbha in northern Ethiopia were on the point of being abandoned. The hillsides were barren, the communities, plagued by floods and droughts, needed constant food aid, and the soil was being washed away. Today, Abraha Weatsbha in the Tigray region is unrecognizable and an environmental catastrophe has been averted following the planting of many millions of tree and bush seedlings. Wells that were dry have been recharged, the soil is in better shape, fruit trees grow in the valleys and the hillsides are green again.


 

  


Eritrea: Conversation with the resistance mov’t inside Asmara
Sunday, October 26, 2014 
Horn Affairs

“There is something happening in Asmara that I had never seen before.The streets are quiet but the tension is important, especially as shortages of water, electricity and fuel have become unbearable. As for the trucks and soldiers which were seen outside Asmara, it is possible that they were positioned to conduct raids in the city. But it is also possible that they were parked in a safe place because of the gasoline shortage.” One thing is clear: The government is in a state of extreme tension, especially since this summer conscripts go into hiding, or stay on leave and no longer report to the barracks. For him, this silent rebellion is motivated by the fact that many people – who are married with children and working in the informal sectors to earn a little money – refuse to lose their meager livelihoods and leave their families destitute by going back to the army.


Why It Is a MUST for Sudan to Join Entebbe Agreement
Dr. Salman Mohamed Ahmed Salman – Sudanow
 
The Sudanese Minister of Water Resources and Electricity, Mutaz Mussa, said in a statement carried by local and regional media on 9 October 2014 that the Sudan would not sign Entebbe Agreement in its present form unless an agreement is reached on the pending issues. The Minister said the Sudan’s constant position is continued cooperation around the Nile Basin issues, stressing the importance of this cooperation irrespective of the framework agreement which the Sudan considers a means for cooperation, rather than an end.

In the wake of the Sudan’s support to construction of the Renaissance Dam, the benefits that can be collected from a sincere cooperation have become apparent. The same benefits can be gained from Entebbe Agreement, which is founded on cooperation, opening up new and wider horizons for cooperation with the other Nile Basin states. If it joins the Agreement, the Sudan, which encompasses the largest part of the Nile Basin, will be regarded as a serious state for cooperation on common basins. The country will also occupy an influential position in the Nile Basin Commission which will be the spearhead for cooperation, exchange of information and conflict resolution. Joining the Entebbe Agreement will show that the Sudan possesses a political will-power for taking decisions that serve its own interests, just as it has done with regard to the Renaissance Dam.


The Foreign-Born Population from Africa: 2008-2012
American Community Survey Briefs, ACSBR/12-16
By Christine P. Gambino, Edward N. Trevelyan, and John Thomas Fitzwater
October 2014

Of the 1.6 million foreign born from Africa in the United States, 36 percent were from Western Africa, 29 percent were from Eastern Africa, and 17 percent were from Northern Africa, followed by Southern Africa (5 percent), Middle Africa (5 per- cent), and other Africa (7 percent) (Figure 2, Table 1). Since 2000, the foreign born from Africa increased by over 700,000 persons, up from a total of 881,300. Over 490,000, or about 70 percent of that growth, has been from countries in Western and Eastern Africa. The largest African-born populations were from Nigeria and Ghana in Western Africa; Ethiopia, Kenya, and Somalia in Eastern Africa; Egypt in Northern Africa; and South Africa in Southern Africa. Of these seven, the four largest were Nigeria (221,000 or 14 percent of the African-born population), Ethiopia (164,000 or 10 percent), Egypt (143,000 or 9 percent), and Ghana (121,000 or 8 percent), together constituting 41 percent of the African-born total.


Ethiopia’s ‘African tiger’ leaps towards middle income
The Guardian 

Progress has been remarkable since 1984’s ‘biblical famine’, but inequality, ethnic tension and civil rights issues need to be addressed. It is now three decades since Ethiopia experienced the infamous famine that cost the lives of more than a million people. The tragedy prompted the BBC’s Michael Buerk to describe it as “a biblical famine in the 20th century” and “the closest thing to hell on Earth”. In sharp contrast with that devastating poverty, Ethiopia is now widely considered to be one of a pack of “African tigers”, with ambitious plans to become a middle-income country by 2025. The nation has, “like the proverbial phoenix, managed to rise from the ashes to become Africa’s fastest-growing non-energy-driven economy”, a senior tax adviser at KPMG Kenya recently noted.


Gail Reed: Where to train the world's doctors? Cuba.
Big problems need big solutions, sparked by big ideas, imagination and audacity. In this talk, journalist Gail Reed profiles one big solution worth noting: Havana’s  Latin American Medical School, which trains global physicians to serve the local communities that need them most. 


Current Issues in Educational Development in Selected African Countries:

A Comparative and International Education Perspective

Ghelawdewos Araia

October 13, 2014

This article intends to critically examine the state of educational developments in Botswana and South Africa from Southern Africa; Ethiopia and Tanzania from East Africa; Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal, and Sierra Leone from West Africa; and Egypt and Morocco from North Africa. The methodology employed throughout the text of this article is the comparative and international education perspective, but the latter, as some people assume, is not simply about comparisons and contrasts. It goes deeper rather in exploring the educational theory and practice in international context, delves into the purposes of schooling, educational access and opportunities, accountability, as well as professionalism and quality education. The methodology also involves demographic attributes, geographical and economic realities, as well as political and cultural factors.  


ETHIOPIAN-BORN BOWFLEX INVENTOR AND ENTREPRENEUR IS DEAD
October 17, 2014 

He came to America at age 17 with just $500 in his pocket and supported himself working as a cab driver. While working on a student project at San Francisco City College, Dosho came up with the idea for the Bowflex exercise machine. He patented the concept and attempted to license the idea to fitness equipment manufacturers. Lacking vision, they all declined. He then wrote a business plan with help from the MBDA, and started marketing the product directly to consumers in the early 1980s. He led his company to a successful IPO, forming a public company called Direct Focus, Inc. (DFXI) with a market cap of over $1 billion. Millions of Bowflex units have been sold in the United State and abroad, and the brand is now owned and marketed by The Nautilus Group (NYSE:NLS). Dosho has 14 patents and 4 pending patents worldwide.


CIRCC Candidate Forum draws political heavyweights to Rainier Valley
The three-year-old Coalition of Immigrants, Refugees and Communities of Color is helping South Seattle's diverse communities speak with one voice. And politicians are listening up.
By David Kroman  October 13, 2014.

 

The Coalition of Immigrants, Refugees and Communities of Color (CIRCC) is still in its “infant stage,” according to Bereket Kiros, an Ethiopian immigrant and south Seattle resident. But last weekend’s third annual Candidates Forum, hosted by the Coalition in Rainier Avenue’s Eritrean Community Center, was proof that that the community is important in the upcoming November election. Dspite Kiros' disappointment, the potential for CIRCC is enormous. In three years, this small, under funded organization had convinced local, state and national policymakers to sit down with them and respond to their issues. Every panel ended with the same question: “Do you, if elected, promise to meet with the Coalition of Immigrants, Refugees and Communities of Color within 60 days? Please answer yes or no.” Every candidate said yes. Whether candidates make good on those promises remains to be seen. But to extract that sort of public commitment from such a large number of prominent candidates is no small thing for an “infant” organization like CIRCC, which is helping the diverse communities of South Seattle speak with one, coherent voice.


Dam Rising in Ethiopia Stirs Hope and Tension
Source: The New York Times By JACEY FORTIN

GUBA, Ethiopia — There is a remote stretch of land in Ethiopia’s forested northwest where the dust never settles. All week, day and night, thousands of workers pulverize rocks and lay concrete along a major tributary of the Nile River. It is the site of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, the continent’s biggest hydropower plant and one of the most ambitious infrastructure projects ever in Africa. Ethiopia is a poor country, often known best for its past famines, but officials say the dam will be paid for without foreign assistance — a point of national pride. Computer-generated images of the finished structure are framed in government offices, splashed across city billboards and broadcast in repeated specials on the state-owned television channel


Perhaps the greatest threat to Ethiopia comes from within
Some of Addis Ababa’s national-development initiatives are bringing the government into conflict with its own people 
Ahmed Soliman
Since 2000 Ethiopia has registered some of the greatest gains in human development seen anywhere on the planet. It is one of Africa’s fastest-growing economies, with near double-digit GDP growth over the past decade and large-scale infrastructure development. Ethiopia’s geostrategic significance is built on a base of relative stability in a volatile region, enabling it to foster international partnerships on development and regional security. But its largely rural population remains poor, and images of drought, famine, poverty and war from the 1970s and 1980s have endured in the popular imagination around the world.


Egypt: Situation Not to Escalate to War If Dam Talks Collapse - Ethiopian President
Cairo — Ethiopia's Grand Renaissance Dam (GERD) has accomplished 40 per cent of the building process, Ethiopian President Mulatu Teshome said Friday, adding that the first phase will be complete next June producing 700 megawatts. The tripartite committee and international consultancy office are not arbitrators, Teshome added in an interview with Sky News Arabia, referring to the expert committee formed by the three Nile Basin countries to provide an advisory opinion over the building process and the harms it might cause. The committee, which is set to resort to international advisory companies, will produce a detailed study on the dam's effect on the flow of the Nile's water as well as the project's environmental, economic and social effects on Egypt and Sudan. It should conclude its report within six months, by March, and its results are to be binding for all.


Emptying Eritrea: Travelling to Europe against all odds 
By FARAI SEVENZO | Monday, September 29 2014

The Mediterranean is fast becoming a massive watery grave for Africans.
Another 500 reportedly drowned off the coast of Italy the other week, while the attention span of the world quickly moves away. But who are these Africans willing to risk all to reach European shores where they are not wanted? Those of us following the story of African migration will have noticed a marked increase in the number of Eritreans being interviewed in refugee camps on the edge of Europe. President Isaias Afewerki is accused by human rights groups of turning the tiny East African country into "one giant prison" and brooks no opposition. The Eritrean parliament has not met since 2002. As for elections, they have not happened since Eritrea broke away from Ethiopia voting for independence in 1993.


The Reporter (Addis Ababa)
27 September 2014
Ethiopia: Where Did Egypt's "We Are Happy" Stance Come From All of a Sudden?

I wanted to write this piece a long time ago, but events in Gaza caught all my attention and I decided to delay it. As we all followed the events of the last couples of weeks,the politics of the Nile River has gotten another momentum. Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan started the tripartite talks all over again after months of being at a standstill. It was all over the media that negotiations of technical expertise among water ministers from Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia had reached a dead end after all parties refused the proposals set by Egypt to reorganize an international committee to restudy the impact of the ongoing construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam. Those who followed the issue clearly understand that Egypt was following the deep-rooted unjust stand of "historical right" in its foreign policy. This policy had clearly affected the negotiation process and delayed the agreement to be reached between Nile basin countries. We had been hearing presidential and political leaders speeches including "Our blood substitutes any decrease of the flow of the river waters, even a single drop" for several times on several occasions.


The Reporter (Addis Ababa)
20 September 2014
Ethiopia: Water to Djibouti and Discourse With Egypt
By Abebe Aynete

What is new in resuming tripartite talks on an Ethiopian multi-billion dollar hydroelectric dam on the Nile after eight months of disruption? Indeed the three countries, Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan have conducted talks from August 25-26 in Khartoum.
The negotiation however, was suspended in January 2014 amid mounting tension between Cairo and Addis Ababa. The new development in the negotiation has picked up where it left off at the time of its interruption, which is the formation of a committee for implementing the agreed proposal involves a hydrology simulation model and a trans-boundary social, economic and environmental impact assessment. The negotiations resumed after Prime Minister Haile Mariam Dessalegn and Egyptian President Al-Sissi's meeting during the 23rd African Union (AU) summit in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea.


The Reporter (Addis Ababa)
27 September 2014
Ethiopia Not Ripe for Microsoft Branch Office

By Henok Reta
While meeting the Ethiopian Information Technology (IT) professionals in Addis Ababa on Tuesday, Edwin Kinoti, Microsoft's Regional Channel Partner Sales Executive-East Africa, told The Reporter that although the global IT giant considers Ethiopia as one of the major markets in the continent, there is no immediate plan to open a regional office here.
Kenya is a hub for Microsoft operations in Eastern Africa region. However, the regional division head is not convinced that the growing market in Ethiopia is up to the level where the company needs to set up shop to oversee operations here. Kinoti believes that Microsoft East Africa office in Kenya is fully capable of serving the entire Ethiopian and Eastern African Region for the time being.


The ISIS Factor: What Islamic Jihad Means for Ethiopia and the Rest of Africa
IDEA Viewpoint

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD September 20, 2014

ISIS is the latest mystique obscurity of the Islamic Jihad variety, but Jihad is not novice to Ethiopia and/or the rest of Africa. The acronym ISIS actually should read ISIL meaning Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (the geographic area that includes Iraq, Jordan, Israel, Syria, and parts of Turkey). The geopolitics of ISIS, though conceptual rather than actual, includes the entire Middle East, all Horn of Africa countries, all North African countries, some African countries, Spain, and countries like Indonesia in South East Asia. 
The new ISIL Jihad extremists who gained momentum in destabilized Syria and Iraq have preferred to use the name ISIS, perhaps inadvertently or by design, in order to have a catchy name that corresponds to the ancient Egyptian goddess, Isis (Aset).


America On Trial: White Supremacy And The Discriminatory Justice System 

Colin Benjamin September 06,2014
The release of two African-American men from prison in North Carolina after 30 years of incarceration for a murder they didn’t commit is yet another example of the American justice system’s racist targeting of African-Americans as the supposed primary criminal class in the country. Between this outrageous case, the recent police broad daylight execution of Mike Brown, and the chokehold killing of Eric Garner, we must ask: isn’t it time we launch a movement to defeat the racist law enforcement and criminal justice system’s systematic war on Black-America? -
 


Ethiopia, Kenya & Ghana bid to host 2017 Africa Cup of Nations
BBC News

Ethiopia, Kenya and Ghana have announced their interest in bidding to host the 2017 Africa Cup of Nations following Libya's withdrawal as the host nation. Libya pulled out last week because of ongoing fighting in the country that has delayed plans to build new stadiums for the 16-team tournament. Ethiopia, who hosted the tournament in 1962, 1968 and 1976, say they will submit their proposal immediately." Our government is ready and interested to do everything it can to bring the tournament back to Ethiopia."  Kenya said in a statement that they are also considering a joint bid with Tanzania or Uganda or Rwanda. 


Egypt, Sudan Agree to Six-Month Study of Ethiopia Hydropower Dam
By William Davison

Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan agreed to complete studies within six months on the impact of an Ethiopian hydropower dam on the main tributary of the Nile river after Egypt raised concern about water shortages. A committee of four experts from each nation will investigate the hydrological, social and environmental effects of the $4.2 billion Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, Ethiopia’s Foreign Ministry said on its website today. International consultants will implement the findings, it said. Foreign experts will help settle any disputes. The dam is scheduled to be finished in 2017.


Ethiopia considers devaluing currency
Tuesday 26 August 2014

ETHIOPIA - Ethiopia says it’s considering the World Bank’s suggestion to devalue its currency, the Birr, but government says it wants to minimize the impact on the wider economy.
In July, the World Bank released its third economic report on Ethiopia and advised the country to devalue its currency. The global lender argues that Ethiopia’s Birr is overvalued and that the country would benefit from making the move, but it wouldn't be the first time for Ethiopia.  In 2010, the government devalued the Birr by ten percent - and by 20 percent the year after; all in line with the country’s Growth and Transformation Plan.


Ethiopia Draws Asia Manufacturing Interest
VOA News

For a long time, economists have discussed East Africa's chances to "get a foot in the door" of global manufacturing. China, as the world's leading hub for mass production, has become expensive due to rising labor and energy costs. Meanwhile, East Africa offers a large young and cheap labor force. Until recently though, delays at ports, bad roads, power outages and political instability have prevented a shift from happening. But now, the Ethiopian government is building new industrial mega-zones that have successfully attracted some foreign investors who are moving manufacturing from China.


US-Africa Summit Underway in Washington
VOA News

August 05, 2014 12:33 AM 

The administration of U.S. President Barack Obama is working to strengthen ties with Africa at a three-day summit in Washington for some 50 African heads of state.
Monday's opening forums touched on a range of issues including security, health, the environment and corruption. At one panel focused on trade, South African President Jacob Zuma urged the United States to renew the trade agreement, African Growth and Opportunity Act, when it expires next year. Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud focused on security issues, saying extremists threaten to hamper progress in eastern Africa, while Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn touched on climate chang
e.


The Art of the Kaizen Approach for Sugar Production in Ethiopia: 
Lessons from the Methara Sugar Factory 

Asayehgn Desta, Ph.D. Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Barowsky School of Business, Dominican University of California

Business Process Reengineering (BPR) deals with fundamental organizational change, or is the great-leap approach to redesigning and retooling. It seeks to bring a radical approach to creating a breakthrough in organizations trapped in outmoded and outdated business processes. Top managers and consultants design new ways of doing things and force companies to go beyond continuous improvement of existing products, services, and processes. Though innovative, BPR is being challenged by some companies looking for a strategic remedy that will contribute to the sustainable improvement of their performance and quality, add value for their customers while minimizing cost and eliminating waste. 



The highly anticipated, well organized, and colorful fund raising event was held at the Emerald City, Seattle, WA to benefit the Kilte-Awlaelo (ክልተ፡ ኣውላዕሎ) Schools Development Association. The association continues to electrify us with their level of careful organization, not only to achieve their vision but also cater, accommodate, and entertain their guests. They persistently strive to raise the bar toward standardizing perfection. Their primary goal is to complement the government efforts by providing opportunities and increase their learning experiences of the young minds around Kilte Awlaelo areas. The association is determined to seal the gaps and address barriers by building schools and other necessary resources. 
Good work Team,
Abel


SPF and Sudacal Group Organize Reception Party for the Sudanese Media Delegation to the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam

The Ethiopian Ambassador to Sudan Abadi Zemo appreciates the Role of Sudanese Media on Ethio-Sudanese Ties Adam Sudacal: We are Committed to lead More Initiatives on Ethio-Sudanese Relations. The Sudanese Organization for Press Freedom and Sudacal International Companies Group organized in Khartoum last week a reception and acknowledgment party for the Sudanese media delegation to the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam - GERD. The delegation comprises of nearly 30 Sudanese journalists started their mission from 2-14 July counting almost two weeks in a land trip from Khartoum to the site of the GERD South West of Ethiopia.


Good Day:
The Sudanese Media Delegation to the Grand Ethiopia Renaissance Dam

07/15/2014

 We have a lot of good examples for media activities between Sudan and Ethiopia addressing Ethio-Sudanese relations but most of these activities are cultural and social with a little involvement in economic and development issues. People from Ethiopia and Sudan usually prefer to attend cultural festivals that represent Ethiopian and Sudanese cultures and they enjoy them pretty much than political activities. To some extent people feel that development issues are official and government-to-government rather than social and people-to-people issues but such an activity like the latest media delegation has totally changed this notion or conceptualization, however, the Sudanese media delegation from both government and private sectors mixed politics with development with all other issues and published articles and reports which are very enjoyable for all people to read.


Report: Africa loses $58bn yearly to the rest of the world By PAUL REDFERN in London | 
Wednesday, July 16 2014 
Africa is losing a staggering $58 billion every year to the rest of the world.
For the first time, a group of UK and East African NGOs have put the figure on the amount sub-Saharan Africa loses through debt repayments, illicit financial flows and illegal activities.
The group is led by Health Poverty Action, but also includes the People’s Health Movement Kenya, the African Forum and Network on Debt and Development, the World Development Movement, War on Want and eight other NGOs. While $134 billion flows into the continent each year, predominantly in loans, foreign investment and aid, $192 billion is taken out, mainly in profits made by foreign companies, tax evasion and the costs of adapting to climate change.


Economic cooperation between Egypt and Ethiopia on the rise
Source: Al Monitor

Cairo is working on resuming the Ethiopian-Egyptian activities that were suspended on all levels. This comes in tandem with the preparations for the expected visit of Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to Ethiopia, and as part of the restoration of dialogue aiming to settle the dispute between the countries over the Renaissance Dam under construction on the Blue Nile. The dialogue was re-opened following the meeting that was held between the Ethiopian prime minister and Sisi on the sidelines of the last African Summit held in Equatorial Guinea


Ethiopia PM Hailemariam defends Andargachew Tsege arrest - BBC
11 July 2014 

Ethiopia had a moral obligation to arrest the opposition leader who was controversially extradited from Yemen last month, Ethiopian leader Hailemariam Desalegn has told the BBC. "Andargachew Tsege is a Trojan horse for the Eritrean government to destabilise this country," he said. In a rare interview Prime Minister Hailemariam has also told the BBC that he will not be swayed by foreign pressure on Ethiopian matters. He spoke to Emmanuel Igunza, who asked him how he would ensure that next year's elections will be fair and all inclusive. 


Consuming what we don't produce, producing what we don't consume
By DANIEL K. KALINAKI | Tuesday, July 8 2014

African Review Illicit outflows
The bigger problem with finance, however, is not with how much comes into Africa but how much leaves. A joint report by the African Development Bank (AfDB) and Global Financial Integrity, a US-based research group, found that cumulative illicit outflows from Africa between 1980 and 2009 ranged between $1.2 trillion and $1.4 trillion.


New Wave of African Writers With an Internationalist Bent - NYT
NY Times

More than a decade ago, when the young Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was struggling to get her first novel, “Purple Hibiscus,” published, an agent told her that things would be easier “if only you were Indian,” because Indian writers were in vogue. Another suggested changing the setting from Nigeria to America. Ms. Adichie didn’t take this as commentary on her work, she said, but on the timidity of the publishing world when it came to unknown writers and unfamiliar cultures, especially African ones.
   These days she wouldn’t receive that kind of advice. Black literary writers with African roots (though some grew up elsewhere), mostly young cosmopolitans who write in English, are making a splash in the book world, especially in the United States. They are on best-seller lists, garner high profile reviews and win major awards, in America and in Britain. Ms. Adichie, 36, the author of “Americanah,” which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction this year, is a prominent member of an expanding group that includes Dinaw Mengestu, Helen Oyeyemi, NoViolet Bulawayo, Teju Cole, Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor and Taiye Selasi, 


Egypt and Ethiopia agree that tripartite dam committee will resume its work
Al Ahram Online

The Egyptian foreign minister along with his Ethiopian counterpart stressed that Ethiopia will understand the importance of the Nile River to Egypt and that Egypt will understand the Ethiopian need for development Egypt and Ethiopia will form a joint committee in the upcoming three months to enhance bilateral relations between the two countries, the foreign ministers of both countries announced in a joint statement on Friday.The statement came after Egypt`s new president, Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi, met with the Ethiopian Prime Minister, Hailemariam Desalegn, after the African Union summit in Equatorial Guinea's capital Malabo.


An Appeal letter to Diaspora Ethiopian Tigreans!
Dear Ethiopian Tegaru Diaspora Members who are coming for Tigray Festival to Meqelle! We residents of Tigray would like to bring our concern to your attention. This is an appeal posted by Save Adina on FB and we find it relevant to send it to websites to be published. When we heard our sisters/brothers are coming home, we are highly motivated to herald Save Adna’s message to them believing that they are not coming home for vacation only. Hence, we hope this call will get to every Ethiopian Tigaru’s address!


International Tigray Festival 2014
A Call for Action

International Tigray Festival 2014 Resource Mobilization Teaming up with Natna Lowti-Our Change Foundation at - http://www.ourchangefoundation.com
Tigray Festival - 2014 which is scheduled to take place from July 31, to August 6, 2014 in Mekelle, Ethiopia is fast approaching. The event is the first of its kind, and will be a landmark in history. Tigray Festival 2014 has an ambitious plan that we hope will play a big role in reversing the current brain drain in our mother land. That project is The Heritage-Youth CenterThere is no doubt in our mind the home grown endowments like EFFORT, and local NGOs, like TDA, and REST, will join us in the noble project. While the Heritage-Youth Center is a long term project of the festival, we also have a current plan.


The Good, the Bad, the Ugly
Thursday, June 12, 2014 2:30 pm
Kim Wenzel

Isaias Afewerki, led the Eritrean People’s Liberation Front, a movement that won independence from Ethiopia in 1991, after 30 years of armed conflict. The Eritrean people celebrated with delight! The old saying, it seemed to-good-to-be-true, applied. The new president and hero, Isaias Afewerki, quickly turned into a dictator.
May 24 of this year marked the 21st birthday of the young nation. The average citizen in the country of six million did little celebrating. Tens of thousands of young people have fled the country over the years, and those remaining live in fear. Today, the Eritrean regime tolerates no dissent of any kind: there is no free media, no university, and even the ruling party — renamed the People’s Front for Freedom and Democracy — has not held a party conference for years.


Ethiopia: Egypt Signaled and signed a diplomatic deal - 
Cairo (HAN) June 13, 2014 – Egyptian President Al Sissi pushes for deal on disputed Nile Dam and Signaled a diplomatic deal with Ethiopia.

President Abdul Fattah Al Sissi signaled a thaw in ties with Addis Ababa, when he said in an inaugural speech that he would not allow a dispute over Ethiopia’s construction of a hydraulic dam on the Nile to “cause a crisis” between both countries or affect inter-African cooperation. “In his 

inaugural speech, Al Sissi sought to remove the impact of Mursi’s notorious meeting,” Hani Raslan, an expert at the state-run Al Ahram Centre for Strategic Studies said. “By signaling readiness to cooperate with Ethiopia, Al Sissi also sought to deprive Ethiopia of its argument that Egypt stands against development in Africa.


Three significant events were held in Seattle on the same day- (ሆይ፡ይባሃል፡አሎ)
The Tigrai Community Association of Seattle celebrated three important events under one roof on the same day. The community celebrated the 23rd anniversary of Ginbot 20 victory which marked the swift victory of the former repressive regime; rejoiced the graduation of 30 TCA youth members; and held a fund raising auction to benefit our late PM Meles Zenawi’s foundation.
The official memorial ceremony began at 8pm on 6/14/14 with 30 seconds of prayers to honor those men and women who have laid down their life for our freedom. The organizing committee kicked off the fund raining activities to benefit the Meles foundation where several generous donors including former fighters made this event a success. Ms. Mebrat Beyene of the consulate general of Ethiopia in Los Angeles attended the event.


Eritrea: Int'l Community Urged to Probe Iran's Toxic Waste Dumped in Eritrea
By Tesfa-Alem Tekle, 10 June 2014 Source Allafrica
Addis Ababa — An Eritrean opposition political organization, the Red Sea Afar Democratic Organization (RSADO) on Tuesday renewed its appeal up on the international community to investigate hazardous waste allegedly dumped inside the red sea nation. In an interview with Sudan Tribune, RSADO's leader, Ibrahim Haron, said the international community has gave "deaf ears" in responding to the group's first official appeal in 2010, when a brown coloured toxic waste materials were first detected. While strongly denouncing what he said was the Eritrea government's "irresponsible and criminal acts" the opposition official alleged that the nuclear and industrial toxic wastes were exported from Iran to Eritrea in exchange of money.


Uganda, S. Sudan oppose Nile deal review 
anzanian Foreign Minister Bernard Kamillius Membe has called for a review of the agreement to consider Egypt's water needs.

World Bulletin / News Desk Uganda and South Sudan have both expressed their opposition to a Tanzanian proposal to review a 2010 Comprehensive Framework Agreement (CFA) signed by upstream Nile Basin countries, known as the Entebbe agreement, in order to consider Egypt's water needs.South Sudan's Foreign Ministry said the Entebbe agreement had to be maintained, since it took into consideration the right of all riparian states to Nile water.
"The agreement speaks of freedom to use the Nile water. Any country along the Nile has the freedom to use the water for their good," ministry spokesperson Mawien Makol Arik told AA.

Sudan reaffirms support for Ethiopia dam project 
In a major U-turn last year, Sudan backed an Ethiopian decision to change the course of the Blue Nile. 


Cairo and Khartoum caught in the winds of the Ethiopian dam
Yasser Al-Hussain
Thursday, 05 June 2014 
Egyptian-Sudanese relations have yet to address any of the major points that are being discussed between the two countries today and this is primarily due to the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam. Sudan is greatly concerned that Egyptian officials believe that it is within the best interests of their country's national security to prevent any dams from being built outside of their national borders. Meanwhile for Sudan, any agricultural development is directly tied to building more dams, particularly outside the Sudanese borders. 


Ethiopia Shoots for the Stars and Galaxies as it Aims to Become Space Science Hub
By James Jeffrey

“Ethiopian politicians have recognized the role space science can play in helping Ethiopia’s development, and are supporting generating investment in the country’s new observatories and space programme.” -- Abinet Ezra, the Ethiopian Space Science Society.


Cairo and Khartoum caught in the winds of the Ethiopian dam .
Yasser Al-Hussain
 
Egyptian-Sudanese relations have yet to address any of the major points that are being discussed between the two countries today and this is primarily due to the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam. Sudan is greatly concerned that Egyptian officials believe that it is within the best interests of their country's national security to prevent any dams from being built outside of their national borders. Meanwhile for Sudan, any agricultural development is directly tied to building more dams, particularly outside the Sudanese borders.  Water storage facilities in Sudan are not capable of housing the amounts of water resources that are needed to irrigate the vast amounts of agricultural planes in the country. Even when it comes to the question of Halayeb, an area of disputed land between the Egyptian and Sudanese border which is currently under Egyptian control much to the fear of the Sudanese, it is likely that Egypt will use this territory as a playing card with which it will place pressure on Sudan to give up some of its most basic water rights.


Book Review: The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam - Official version
Former Egyptian irrigation and water resources minister examines the history of Ethiopia's plans to construct a dam on the Nile River
Mahmoud El-Wardani, Thursday 15 May 2014

Azmat Sadd Al-Nahda Al-Ethiopi (The Ethiopian Renaissance Dam Crisis) by Mohamed Nasr El-Din Allam, Dar Al-Mahroussa Publishing, Cairo, 2014. pp.242
The story of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, which Ethiopia has already started to construct, has a long history that dates back to the 1950s. Ethiopia has attempted many times to control the sources of the Nile -- Egypt's lifeline. The book's author is a former Egyptian minister of irrigation and water resources, who took office in 2009 in a decisive period in which Ethiopia attempted to build an alliance of upstream states against downstream states. The objective of this alliance was to breach the historic Nile treaties. Certainly the author is not just an official running one of the oldest ministries in Egypt and the most bureaucratic, but he also has intimate knowledge of the minutest details of the issue. This issue is directly linked to Egyptian national security. It goes without saying that all documents, treaties, maps, data and agreements were at his disposal.


Egypt: Why Is Egypt's Hydro-Political Concern More Intense On Sudan?
By Nurye Yassin, 31 May 2014
Allafrica

opinion
The world has recently witnessed the long march of Egypt's indignation to Ethiopia's move on the construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) over the Blue Nile (Abay) River.
Many Egyptian politicians and hydro-political strategists with their media acolytes promptly have portrayed the GERD as the bell ringing the complete final apocalypse of Egypt. To discard the apocalyptic imagery of the GERD and clear the clouds of such a vision of the said strategists, Ethiopia has tried to unravel the real benefits of the Dam to Egyptian and Sudanese citizens with great caution and the sine qua non of genuine cooperation and dialogue to finalize the recommendations of the International Panel of Experts (IPoE) report.


Ethiopian power project wins backing from geothermal fund
The contract, worth up to $8 million, was signed by the African Union (AU) and the Icelandic-US private developer Reykjavik Geothermal Limited (RG) for drilling the wells at the Corbetti geothermal power project. The grant was awarded under the AU-led ‘geothermal risk mitigation facility’, which is designed to encourage public private investment and financial support for geothermal exploration in East Africa. The grant was approved at an international donor meeting in Iceland last week hosted by the AU Commission and the International Development Bank.


Ethiopia at a Glance

United Nations Development Programme
Annual Report 2013

Ethiopia is among the fastest growing economies in the world and has maintained an average GDP
growth rate of 11percent in the last ten years. In 2012/13 fiscal year the economy grew by 9.7 percent, which  is higher than the sub-Saharan Africa‘s average GDP growth rate of 4 percent. 
Gross Domestic Product. Ethiopia’s GDP is $ 47 Billion by end of 2012/13, the economy has been growing by 10.9% on average in the past decade, and growth is estimated to be 11.2 percent for 2013/14. Agriculture accounted for 43% of GDP in 2013 in contrast to 51% share in 2007. The sector generates over 70% export values and employs 85% of the population. The share of the service sector has been increasing in the past decade and reached 45% in 2013 from 39.8% in 2007 Industry’s share remains low at around 12%.


Elias S. Siraj, M.D., F.A.C.E., F.A.C.P.
AACE Outstanding Service Award for the Promotion of Endocrine Health of an Underserved Population

Elias S. Siraj, M.D., F.A.C.E., F.A.C.P., is a Professor of Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He is also Director of Endocrinology Fellowship Training Program and Director of Diabetes Program. He has also served Temple as the Director of Clinical Endocrinology.  Dr. Siraj attended medical school in Ethiopia at Gondar College of Medical Sciences, Addis Ababa University. He was then awarded a scholarship to do residency and research training at the University of Leipzig, Germany. Subsequently, he completed his residency and fellowship training at the Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.


Manufacturing: Ethiopia receives World Bank loan to create jobs

Source African Report
Ethiopia on Tuesday received a $250 million dollar loan from the World Bank to finance the implementation of a competitiveness and job creation project in the country.
The agreement intends to support Ethiopia's efforts of creating new jobs and increase competitiveness in the light of a growing manufacturing sector through the development of industrial zones in Addis Ababa and enhancing linkages with the local economy.


Prisoners of Past History or Producers of a Better Future?
By Tesfaye Habisso, 

“I like the dreams of the future better than the history of the past.” [Thomas Jefferson, 1743-1826]
. “The study of history is the best medicine for a sick mind; for in history you have a record of the infinite variety of human experience plainly set out for all to see; and in that record you can find yourself and your country both examples and warnings; fine things to take as models, base things rotten through and through, to avoid.” [Livy]
Since recent times, my wife and I have somehow developed a sort of deep interest or passion for Pastor (Dr.) Gamachis Desta’s* evangelical sermons on the Elshaddai program broadcasted to Christian followers in Ethiopia every week. 


The Ancient Rock-Carved Churches of Lalibela, Ethiopia [360-Degree Panorama]
Last updated on May 15th, 2014 by Audrey Scott 

The story goes: almost 900 years ago in Ethiopia there lived a visionary king named Lalibela.
Lalibela traveled far and wide, including an extended pilgrimage he took to Jerusalem, after which he brought back home to Ethiopia all he’d seen and learned. When Muslims conquered Jerusalem in the late 12th century and it became too dangerous for devout Ethiopian Christians to make the pilgrimage to Jerusalem itself, Lalibela fashioned a work-around: to build a New Jerusalem in his home country.


Why ‘Made in Ethiopia’ Could Be The ‘Next Made in China’ 
Mounting labor costs in China are part of what makes Africa so attractive. The average monthly wage for a low-skilled Ethiopian factory worker, for example, is about 25% of the pay for a comparable Chinese worker, according to the World Bank. As the wage gap widens between unskilled Chinese workers and their counterparts elsewhere in Asia and in Africa, as many as 85 million factory jobs could leave China in the coming years, according to former World Bank chief economist Justin Yifu Lin.


Canadian-mine-in-eritrea-had-been-built-partly-by-defacto-slaves

 

Djibouti (HAN) May 14, 2014. Regular Expert Analysis , Your Power & Regional Influence Magazine. The Horn of Africa country of Eritrea is a new gold mining zones with a number of exciting mining developments taking place. Some of these are occuring in remote, semi desert locations, presenting particular challenges to the mining companies and the staff. These challenges can include temperatures that approach 50°C and dust storms. Eritrean authority led by President Isaias Afwerki rejected as “cheap shots and lies” a report by Human Rights Watch that said forced labor was used to construct a gold mine it owns with Canada’s Nevsun Resources Ltd. (NSU)Segen Construction Co. According to the reporters by William Davison in Addis Ababa,By the time construction commenced at Bisha in late 2008, forced labour was an inseparable feature of Eritrea’s economy. Nevsun appreciated this. “We recognized that there was a potential National Service issue with respect to the subcontractor,” CEO Cliff Davis told a parliamentary subcommittee in 2012. 


A reported past attack on Africans in the Ukraine. Source: observers.france24.com
[Op-Ed: The Pan African Agenda]

An Agenda For The 21st Century


In his appeal for assistance addressed to the United African Congress (UAC) and Give Them a Hand Foundation, the president of the African Center in Kiev, King Assante-Yeboa chronicles the daily travails and existential threats the Africans face in these turbulent times in the Ukraine.
He goes on to say: “As visible minorities especially Africans and African-Ukrainians still face racially motivated abuses, some of them are compelled to stay in doors to avoid possibility of being physically attacked”. The heads of households have been deprived of their ability to provide for their families; victims of intimidation and assaults in a deteriorating and increasingly uncertain economic and political environment. Many are in need of urgent material assistance to help pay for food and rent.


Creating Territorial Boundaries to Design the Political Order of Self- rule and Shared-rule of Federal Units: A Review 
Desta, Aayehgn, Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Barowsky School of Business, Dominican University of California
Introduction

Trends in the formation of ethnic-national and regional federalism have recently spurred literature on political economy. Since these legitimate bases, contents, and divisions are the central themes of federalism, a number of researchers have addressed the dilemmas and opportunities faced by a number of federalist states. More specifically, researchers are attempting to articulate important exogenous and endogenous factors and then to examine them critically for their viability for federalism.   The most profound issue that surrounds federalism is that unitary sovereign states are breaking into autonomous ethnic or cultural cleavages. Regions are seeking a combination of self-rule and shared rule without facing constrained control from the central government.  Given the relationship between the doctrine of federalism and the diffusion of central governmental power to impose its norms upon the autonomous regions, the central focus of this study is to examine the modalities of federalism. 


Ethiopia: Having Your Cake and Eating It Too: Egyptian Style
By Awash Lemma

Introduction
The Benefits of the GERD to Ethiopia and also to the downstream countries of Egypt and the Sudan have been discussed exhaustively elsewhere and I do not intend to repeat them here. This piece is triggered by the mindless hysteric propaganda from Cairo - declaration after declaration - threatening, blackmailing, posturing - abuses of all sorts against Ethiopia. The motto seems to be ‘a declaration a day will blow the GERD away!’ The Egyptians even gave Ethiopia the status of god, by demanding Ethiopia should guarantee that the volume of water flowing from the Nile will never change because of the construction of the GERD. 


Yohannes IV of Ethiopia: A Political Biography 
Revised Edition, The Red Sea Press 2014Authored by Zewde Gabre-Sellassie, 
PhD Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD
May 6, 2014


There is no doubt that Yohannes was in favor of Ethiopian Muslims embracing Christianity, and he was also in favor of the Holy City of Askum to be free of Muslims but he did not support the idea of congregating Muslims at Addi Gwatsiya, a ghetto-like area for the followers of Islam. On the contrary, he granted them land in Mekelle, not far from his palace and in many other cities such as Koda and Mai Kumel near Aksum; Edaga Malka in Naeder, and Addi Dahno in Shire; Addi Agam in Awger; Hatsiba in Enda Abba Tsahma; Addi Tegemes in Zengui; Begié Ella in Segli; Addi Zeamere in Enticho; Enda Abba Qendi in Enda Chewa, and Negash in Kilte Awlaélo. (p. 31)


National Bank of Ethiopia Defying Government Proclamation 270/2002
I read an article in Waltainfo.com that heads as “Standard Bank to Open Ethiopian Office”. If this is true, then the foreign bank must have some information that others do not have. Bank ownership in Ethiopia is legally closed to foreign ownership, meaning only Ethiopians are allowed to have ownership and operations in the financial sector. In the context of Ethiopians, the government has found a compromise to include all Ethiopians in Diaspora, including those with foreign pass with the proclamation 270/2002. The only requirement is to have the so called “Yellow ID Card” from the respective Embassy of Ethiopia.


Ethiopia: Rethinking the Voices of Aswan Dam and GERD
By Nurye Yassin,

Endless echoes of Egypt's disrelish, imaginative fear, uncorroborated reports from partisan experts, and mythical prophecies of the perils of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) upon the peoples of Egypt have reverberated and resonated over the geopolitical sphere of the Eastern Nile Basin. The media, academia, polity and hydro-diplomacy deployed are also calling to halt the construction of the Dam. It is very timely and quite essential to unveil and fathom Egypt's enigmatic hydro-political calculation and conclusion behind the Aswan Dam and Ethiopia's aspirations to make GERD an emblem of regional progress and prosperity. Egypt's colonial, paternalistic mentality of if I win, you lose must wither and Ethiopia's win-win must flourish over the hemisphere of the Nile Basin. Egypt's leadership must innovate itself than extending the singular delusory principle of the country to control the Nile. As Ethiopia's Reawakening is being manifested, Egypt's must be borne for the sustainability of humankind on the Nile River.


Jakarta, Manila Pegged as Global Leaders 
By Jake Maxwell Watts

Jakarta and Manila, two of Asia’s most chaotic, congested cities, are likely to get a lot better in the next two decades, according to a new ranking by A.T. Kearney.
The U.S.-based consulting firm placed Indonesia’s capital at the top of a list of 34 cities in low and middle income countries most likely to become a global leader in everything from business activity to workforce health and security. The Philippine capital grabbed second place, followed by Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa. The only other Southeast Asian countries on the list were Kuala Lumpur (10), Bangkok (21), and Ho Chi Minh City (29).


Alliance and Alienation 

Ethiopia and Israel in the Days of Haile Selassie 

Authored by Haggai Erlich, PhD The Red Sea Press, 2014

Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD April 17, 2014

Haggai Erlich is a renowned Israeli historian and an Ethiopianist, and this is not the first time he is writing about Ethiopia. One of his excellent books on Ethiopia put out by the Lynne Rienner Publishers in 1986 is Ethiopia and the Challenge of Independence. What makes Alliance and Alienation different is the fact that the book is heavily focused on diplomacy and intelligence with respect to the Ethiopian-Israeli relations. The book also provides the reader some secretly conducted diplomatic ventures and investments of the Israeli Government as well as the unofficial sojourn of Israeli leaders in Ethiopia.  


The Misdirection of Healthcare Facilities:
Don’t You Need to Wake up Before it's Too Late? 

Professor Desta, Asayehgn 
While the fundamentals of human rights place health services as indispensable for the exercise of other human rights conducive to living a life of dignity, the human capital theory locates health as fundamental to enhancing the efficiency and productivity of the labor force. Given these as fundamental rights of health services, it is disheartening to note that a number of policy makers in a number of developing countries don’t seem to have a sustained political will to allocate their limited heath sector budget to providing accessible health care facilities for their citizens. 


Ethiopia slammed the extremist anti-dam group International Rivers


International Rivers Network (IRN), an extremist anti-dam group based in the People's Republic of Berkeley has been slammed by the Ethiopian government for its one sided report against the construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD), on Ethiopia's mighty Abay river. 
The National Panel of Experts of GERD accused IRN "of subverting Ethiopia’s efforts to develop its water resources and lift its vast and growing population out of poverty." It accused the IRN of being paid by Egypt in order to lobby against the Renaissance Dam internationally. 
"Again, the IRN never loses opportunity to lobby for its Egyptian paymasters. Not only does the IRN talk about the 'oversize' of GERD, but also about the Egyptians’ negative emotions over GERD: anger and fear."


Being Ethiopian in Seattle 
A book explores the experiences of Ethiopian refugees adapting to Seattle and suggests their presence is changing the community

By Jerry Large
Seattle Times staff columnist
Retired UW sociologist
Joseph Scott
In 1980, the federal government started placing Ethiopian refugees in Seattle, one of a few cities chosen to receive what would eventually be thousands of people — at least 10,000 now just in the Seattle area. “It is the first significant migration of black Africans to America since slavery times,” Joseph Scott told me when we spoke Monday at his home in Southeast Seattle. 
Scott, an ethnologist and sociologist, wrote “Little Ethiopia of the Pacific Northwest” (Transaction Publishers, 2013) in collaboration with Solomon A. Getahun, a history professor at Central Michigan University, and himself a refugee. 


Ethiopia is ranked as Sub-Saharan Africa's strongest military power 
Ethiopia is ranked as the strongest military power in Sub Saharan Africa, according to a study by Global Fire Power. The study claims to make use of over 40 factors to determine each country's power index. Ethiopia with with a total population of 93 million people has 182,500 active frontline personnel. More than 24 million people are considered fit for military service. In its arsenal, Ethiopia's military has over 560 tanks, more than 780 armored fighting vehicles. It also has one of the strongest air power in the continent with more than 81 fighting aircraft and as well as 8 attack helicopters.


Ethiopia dismisses International Rivers as Egypt’s proxy 
Daniel Berhane

Ethiopia rejected anti-dam group’s call for the cessation of the construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance dam. The American-based International Rivers Network made the demand on March 31 in a statement titled “GERD panel of Experts Report: Big Questions Remain”.
Addis Ababa responded today in a press release by her National Panel of Experts (NPoE) rebuking International Rivers Network’s (IRN) statement as “full of lies and distortions”, adding that:
we condemn IRN’s unfair and biased support for Egypt in its disagreements with Ethiopia contrary to its own mission statement. We categorically reject IRN’s advice to Ethiopia to accept its proposal and halt construction of GERD….. IRN is doing ethically dubious job and propagating proxy campaigns against Ethiopia on behalf of Egypt.


Dr. Desta, Asayehgn, the recipient of Melba Beals Award for Excellence in Diversity
A humble scholar, quiet leader, and a person who never shirks his responsibility to ask the difficult questions, this recipient has a sustained, long-term history for diversity work at Dominican that dates back to 1993. He has published books, financially supports a vocational school in Ethiopia all by himself, serves as a role model for faculty and students, and has been at the forefront of diversity work that has paved the way for many faculty and students of color who have entered DUOC. He has been a persistent advocate for diversity even when his questions and observations have been unpopular – so much so that his struggle to diversify the campus as one of the few faculty of color at DUOC when he started 27 years ago can be identified as a pioneering foundation for all that has followed. Multiple faculty of color and others acknowledge his deep and abiding work for diversity at DUOC, internationally, across continents, and the African Diaspora. He is recognized for his excellence in diversity work for not just his accomplishments, but for his humanity, and for always being a person who stands up for what is right and for giving voice to the diversity of people who need it most. We recognize Dr. Asayeghn Desta for his sustained efforts toward diversity and inclusion at DUOC and in the international community.


The Ground Water Potential of the North African Region and the Nile Issue

Asmamaw Temesgen was a native of Lake Tana Region, source of the Abay River, April 7, 2014.
This article was designed to provide a brief overview on the Geo-scientific information and the economic potential of the enormous natural water reserves in the North African Region. Focus was made to the growing water resource demands of the region, particularly on the “Nile River Saga”. The writer has a Geo-scientific back ground and aims to draw more attention to some of the relevant information about the ground water potential of the region that has not been covered from the Egyptian’s standpoint.


Milena BelloniApril 5, 2014 06:42
It's April, which means Eritrea's refugees are headed north

‘Wey keb wey geb! All or nothing!’

Last year Europe received around 484,600 asylum applications, according to the United Nations Humanitarian Commission on Refugees (UNHCR). Among those, 21,293 were Eritrean refugees, the majority of whom had arrived by boat from Libya to Italy. The tragedy in which 366 Eritrean migrants drowned in a boat off the coast of the Italian island of Lampedusa last October is still raw in the minds of many people who lost friends and relatives. But this will not stop other refugees from making the same journey. For the last decade a continuous flow of people have left Eritrea, unable to bear life in what they describe as a prison state. Eritrea has not held free elections since 1993 when Eritreans voted for independence from Ethiopia after a 30-year-long struggle. After a few years of peace, in 1998 a war broke out between Eritrea and Ethiopia that lasted two years. Ever since then the entire population has been fully militarized.


Egypt’s Historic Right over the River Nile
By G. E. Gorfu

Since the first foundation stone was laid on the Grand Renaissance Dam (GRD) Egypt has shown its eternal belligerence towards Ethiopia, demanding Ethiopia honor the 1929 and 1959 Colonial treaties. At times Egypt walks out from the negotiations; at times it pretends to go along with the agreements but refuses to sign the Nile Basin Treaty; at times Egypt demands more studies to be done, refusing to accept various studies done so far; at times it threatens it would wage war. And it continues to harp on its “Historic Right” over the waters of the River Nile.


BLUE NILE MONOLOGUE 
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD 

April 3, 2014 


I was born millions of years ago 
Perhaps 180 million years geological timeline 
When Gondwanaland broke up 
During the Mesozoic period 
When crustal extension took place 
Beyond the Lake Ţana Near the mountain called Denquez 


The Battle of Adwa, African Victory in the Age of Empire: A Reflection 

Desta, Asayehgn, Ph.D, Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Dominican University of California 

Introduction
The defeat of Italy by Ethiopia on March 1, 1896 at the Battle of Adwa, then the vibrant capital of Tigrai, not only demonstrated the resilience and patriotism of Ethiopians but also made Ethiopia the steward of future hopes for the emancipation of the other nations that were subjugated under foreign rule. For example, Japan, used Ethiopia’s experience as its model and developed a strategy to fight against Russia in 1904. However, for a number of the European colonialists, when they heard that Italy was defeated by the heroic Ethiopian army at the Battle of Adwa in 1896, they were surprised and humiliated that members of the white race had lost. They suddenly had to rethink their ideas and policies about Africa being predominantly inhabited by primitive people that needed colonial rule in order to advance into a modern world.


Healthline: It’s All About Resources
Source: Fortune

FORTUNE: The Private Health Sector Program (PHSP) in which you are involved aims to optimise, regulate and cement partnership with the public sector for sustainable universal access. But how is it possible for the Program to achieve these, as the two sectors have been mired in misgivings and complaints against one another? Tesfaye G. Kidan: I would say that the basis for any progress, be it among people or groups, is creating common ground. Thus, there has to be an atmosphere of understanding.
It begins, in this case, with identifying the complaints by the private sector and the demands of the public health sector. These need to be clearly understood. Then, the trial to devise a solution to bring the two together can come.


THE NILE WATER ISSUE AND…
A PEACEFUL SOLUTION SUGGESTED MANY YEARS AGO…

Open Letter to Prime Minister Meles Zenawi
by G. E. Gorfu

Dear Prime Minister, I only have one question: When did Ethiopia become a protectorate of Egypt? Otherwise, why on earth is Ethiopia requesting the permission of Egypt to use the waters that rightly belong to her? I am sure you know very well the history of our ancestors: Haileselassie, Menelik, Yohannes, Alula, Tewodros, and many others. Not one of them would ever go this low as to beg Egypt's permission for the use of a body of water found in the heart of Ethiopia? Why should Ethiopia uphold any treaty signed between Egypt and England, or any other two nations for that matter, to which Ethiopia was not a party of, or signatory to? Other riparian nations rejected those treaties, and Ethiopia too, should never uphold them.


On behalf of the Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA), Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia will soon begin reviewing several books on Ethiopia and two of the books whose image is shown here, 'Alliance and Alienation' by Haggai 

Erlich and 'Yohannes IV of Ethiopia' (revised edition) by Zewde Gebre-Selassie  will be the first to be reviewed. Readers interested in purchasing the books can directly contact the the publisher at the address below:

The Red Sea Pres, Inc. 541 W. Ingham Ave Suite B

Trenton, Nj 08638   (609) 695-3200

                              awprsp@verizon.net    http://www.africaworldpressbooks.com/


Somalia: The Diplomat’s feeling of political confederation system linking Somalia, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Eritrea 
Ambassador Samantar: I feel that if a system of political confedera­tion linking Somalia, Ethiopia, Djibouti, and Eritrea were someday established on the basis of the right of peoples to self-determination, the Horn of Africa would be transformed into an oasis of peace, stability, and prosperity. If that happened, Somalia would rediscover its lost unity, Ethiopia would have access to both the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean, Eritrea could freely choose its destiny, and Djibouti would find tranquility without being coveted by its big sisters. Peace could finally be established in that part of the African continent, and that is the sine qua non condition for its development, which alone will enable the inhabitants to view the future with optimism and hope. - See more at: http://geeskaafrika.com/?p=2047#sthash.lYILj0Mk.dpuf


UNSC: The Somalia and Eritrea Sanctions Committee Revises its Guidelines - 
New York (HAN) On 26 March 2014,REVISES ITS GUIDELINES SECURITY COUNCIL 751 AND 1907
COMMITTEE ON SOMALIA AND ERITREA - the Security Council Committee pursuant to resolutions 751 (1992) and 1907 (2009) concerning Somalia and Eritrea adopted revised Guidelines for the Conduct of its Work. These latest Guidelines reflect Security Council resolution 2142 (2014). The Committee has adopted the revised Guidelines to facilitate the conduct of its own work and provide useful guidance to Member States in their efforts to implement the relevant Security Council resolutions. The English language version of the revised Guidelines is available on the Committee’s website* and versions of the Guidelines in all six official languages will be made available on the website in due course. - See more at: http://geeskaafrika.com/?p=1970#sthash.HPBzPbOY.dpuf


Ethiopia lashed out at longstanding rival Eritrea
ADDIS ABABA (HAN) March 28, 2014 – The Ethiopian foreign ministry spokesman atto. Mufti has lashed out at longstanding rival Eritrea, accusing the latter of destabilizing the East Africa region, while also blasting Egypt for the latter’s “malicious” media campaign against Ethiopia’s multibillion-dollar hydroelectric dam project. ”Eritrea’s involvement in regional conflicts has been the case for long now,” Ambassador Dina Mufti told foreign journalists at a weekly press briefing on Thursday. According to Mufti, Eritrea has played a role in the ongoing conflict in South Sudan. ”We have circumstantial evidence of Eritrea’s involvement [in the South Sudan crisis],” the spokesman said. - See more at:
http://geeskaafrika.com/?p=2015#sthash.KFj26HoT.dpuf


Japan brings kaizen philosophy to Ethiopia
By Paul Melly BBC News, Ethiopia 

"Sorting, setting in order, shining, standardising, sustaining," proclaims a handwritten poster stuck to the wall of a shed where women gather twice a week to make craft items in the village of Faniekir. Kaizen, the workplace philosophy that helped guide Japan's recovery from the ruins of defeat in World War Two, has reached the rural uplands of southern Ethiopia.
Simple principles of tidiness and self-discipline are among the foundations of an approach that so impressed the late prime minister Meles Zenawi that he adopted it as national strategy.


Meet the three Eritrean women who are taking on the regime
Feruz Werede, Selam Kidane and Meron Estefanos are finding ways of challenging one of the most repressive states in Africa.

Eritrea – bordering on the Red Sea – is a land of extremes. The searing heat of its deserts and the harness of the mountains are softened by abundant valleys and a green, fertile plateau. Much the same can be said of its politics. Fierce and stubborn in their 30-year war of independence from Ethiopia that ended in May 1991, the Eritrean people briefly held the promise of a model state, with an open democracy and real hopes of prosperity.  Yet today Eritrea is among the most repressive states in Africa. Thousands of its youth, desperate to escape interminable conscription, flee the country, running the risk of drowning in the Mediterranean or being sold to people-traffickers in the Sinai.


CAIRO - When Egypt’s then-president Mohamed Morsi said in June 2013 that “all options” including military intervention, were on the table if Ethiopia continued to develop dams on the Nile River, many dismissed it as posturing. But experts claim Cairo is deadly serious about defending its historic water allotment, and if Ethiopia proceeds with construction of what is set to become Africa’s largest hydroelectric dam, a military strike is not out of the question. Relations between Egypt and Ethiopia have soured since Ethiopia began construction on the 4.2 billion dollar Grand Renaissance Dam in 2011. Egypt fears the new dam, slated to begin operation in 2017, will reduce the downstream flow of the Nile, which 85 million Egyptians rely on for almost all of their water needs. Officials in the Ministry of Irrigation claim Egypt will lose 20 to 30 percent of its share of Nile water and nearly a third of the electricity generated by its Aswan High Dam.


ETHIOPIA: RED LINES, GREEN BANANA TREES: SAME PLAYBOOK DIFFERENT PLAYS FOR EGYPT
By Teshome Abebe

March 22, 2014 

But of all the inexplicable opposition to the GERD, the voices being heard from Egypt are the most intractable. There is no hiding the fact that Egypt would as soon not see the progress of the GERD in line with its long opposition to the development of the Nile Basin countries, particularly Ethiopia. This opposition has been documented time and again, and it is not necessary to repeat them here. Suffice it to state as bizarre the most recent declaration by some within Egypt that they would plant the entire Sudanese and Egyptian deserts with green banana tress to create so much rainfall that it would render the GERD useless. The current disagreement over the GERD is a technical one. Ethiopia does not have a political, military or border disagreement with Egypt. In fact, Ethiopia has continued to be generous both with its goodwill as well as its accommodation of Egypt’s understandable anxiety over the dam and the Nile. But what ought to be clear as well is that Ethiopia has no legal responsibility to Egyptians to provide them with plenty of water to use or even waste.


Ethiopia Sees Output at Africa’s Biggest Power Plant by 2015
Source: Bloomberg

Ethiopia will begin generating electricity within 18 months from what will be Africa’s largest power plant, the government said.The sale of 7.1 billion birr ($367 million) of bonds over the past three years to domestic investors, has contributed to the 27 billion birr spent so far on the 75.5 billion birr Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam hydropower project, said Zadig Abraha, deputy general director of the GERD national coordination office. The central bank in April 2011 ordered banks to buy government bonds equivalent to 27 percent of their loans to help fund infrastructure projects


Ethiopia's clothes firms aim to fashion global sales
By James Jeffrey Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 

Source: BBC News

Ethiopian fashion designer Fikirte Addis kneels down and wraps a tape measure around the waist of a customer, before scribbling on a piece of paper on which the outline of a flowing gown takes shape. The customer, Rihana Aman, owns a cafe in the capital, Addis Ababa, and went to Ms Fikirte's shop in the city, Yefikir Design, for a wedding dress fitting. The dress, however, is actually for her sister, who lives and works in London, but will soon return to her homeland with her English fiance.


Ethiopia and U.S. to join anti-corruption drive
(Reuters) - Ethiopia, the United States and Papua New Guinea are on course to join the leading world initiative to combat corruption in the energy and mining industries. The Oslo-based Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) approved their applications on Wednesday, drawing swift criticism from human rights campaigners for admitting Ethiopia. The three now have three years comply with EITI standards. Ethiopia has no proven petroleum reserves and a small mining industry driven by potash producers. Rights activists accuse it of political repression.


Folder Header: Nepotism and misappropriation as management practices within the African Peer Review Mechanism 
By Ramata Sore 
1st article: Do The UNDP and the European Union encourage poor governance? 
This is the question that one needs to ask himself. These two international institutions for several years are informed of misappropriation that take place in the APRM. But their lethargy toward this situation has fuelled an environment conducive to discrediting the APRM, its leaders, and by extension the African continent.


The Ethiopia Eritrea No War No Peace Situation has to End

By Tariku Debretsion

The Horn of Africa is the most conflict ridden region in the world. The people and the land are devastated by endless wars. The de facto no war no peace policy that has persisted between Ethiopia and Eritrea for the last 13 years affects the lives of millions in both countries and the stability of the whole region. Bringing this conflict to a peaceful resolution is of paramount importance. The devastating 1998 - 2000 war between Ethiopia and Eritrea cost billions of dollars in infrastructure damage, missed investment opportunities and lost aid, claimed about 100,000 lives, and dislocated millions  of people. Instead of the end of the war bringing peace, for the last fourteen years the policy of both countries has been “no war no peace.”  As bad as open war is, an endless no war no peace situation is insufferable. 


Professor Raymond Jonas
Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, 1985

I am a historian of the modern era. My most recent work concerns African resistance to European expansion. The Battle of Adwa: African Victory in the Age of Empire (Harvard, 2011) aims both to narrate this signal event in global history and to follow the Adwa story as it rolls through African and European diasporic communities. A companion web site BattleOfAdwa.org augments and extends this work.
Earlier work elaborated the political culture of counter-revolution, notably in art, architecture, and ritual. France and the Cult of the Sacred Heart: an Epic Tale for Modern Times (California, 2000) explores key features of the cold civil war that simmered for over a century after the Revolution of 1789. The Tragic Tale of Claire Ferchaud and the Great War (California, 2005) adopts the biographical form to follow an unusual personality as she navigates the boundary between divine inspiration and hysteria. Industry and Politics in Rural France, 1870-1914 (Cornell, 1994) subverts the conventional story of the making of the European working class by focusing on unconventional members of it.


Book Review: Essays on the Socio-Political and Economic Perspectives of Ethiopia
Francisco Goya, documenting the Spanish Wars of the 19th Century in scores of his paintings, demonstrated history can be presented in one of many ways – through the art of colors on canvass. Such is Professor Desta Asayehegn’s Essays on the Socio-Political and Economic Perspectives of Ethiopia, a fast paced work of art which has fourteen essays that can be seen as independent and stand-alone chapters on historic epochs of Ethiopia, but are in reality a well crafted and carefully documented series on the history of Ethiopia spanning the last hundred years. These essays focus on the interaction between the major and underlying economic forces, both on, and by international and domestic actors, and how Ethiopia’s history progressed from the era of Menelik and Italian invasion and occupation to develop into what we have today. 


Overcoming Water Scarcity Problem in Ethiopia

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

March 12, 2014 መጋቢት 3 2006

In anticipation of World Water Day, which will be observed on March 22, the Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA) presents ideas and strategies to overcome the problem of water scarcity and water public works in Ethiopia. It may sound paradoxical for Ethiopians (the people of the Blue Nile) to go thirsty when their country, in fact, is the source of all waters that replenish the gift of life for the neighboring peoples. But, that is the stark reality now. Therefore, this Amharic article proposes several methods to solve water shortage problems in Ethiopian communities and IDEA hopes they will be implemented and effectively reverse the current problem that has afflicted many districts in the country.


February 10, 2014
What happened to the African Renaissance?
Postliberation Eritrea

Special issue of the journal Africa Today, Volume 60.2
Guest editor: Tekle M. Woldemikael AFT-60_2-Cover-1
Twenty years ago, Eritrea conducted a successful referendum, gaining independent state status. It received recognition as a new African Renaissance state, and was on the forefront of African renewal and rebirth, which included the nations of South Africa, Namibia, Uganda, and Ethiopia as well. This occurred after many gloomy years of pessimism about progress, stability, and democracy in Africa. In the 1990s, a series of African nationalist liberation movements gained power that stimulated international and local observers’ imagination for the dawning of an African Renaissance. There was hope that the Pan-Africanist dream of African unity would bring a new level of continental unity, economic growth, and political stability. This task rested on the shoulders of a new generation of African leaders


Imperialism in Africa, its Implications and the Way forward for African People
I think lack of a strong & far visionary and patriotic leadership in Africa with impeccable commitment to Africa’s cause is problem number one to the continent today. My understanding is that behind every success or failure, there is a factor of leadership. For example, it is painful really that in the today’s 21st Century, we still have leaders many of whom are sectarian including at presidential level.


The Somalization of Eritrea: Stuck at Its Fluid Stage of Totalitarianism
Source Asmerino.com

The melting down of the nation state Eritrea, as displayed in its institutional, economic, infrastructural, military, political and demographic meltdowns, has now reached its highest level. Even though these meltdowns keep feeding on one another to reach the critical stages they are at, it is the demographic one that is driving the nation to the brink of collapse, in the process hollowing out the army, the labor force, the family, the villages, towns and cities, and eventually the nation itself. If one of those self-proclaimed nations in Somalia – Somaliland, Puntland, etc – were to find itself in fear of further fragmentation, it would have been natural to ask whether that has to do with itself being the result of fragmentation from the bigger Somalia. If so, it would also be natural to raise a similar question in regard to Eritrea.


Africa’s Next Oil Frontier – Ethiopia?

Source OilPrice
Sitting athwart the headwaters of the Blue Nile, Ethiopia has long seen its energy future in its hydropower potential, being able to export electricity to neighboring countries.
That picture may be about to be somewhat altered however. British oil firm New Age (African Global Energy) Ltd works a concession in Ethiopia’s southeastern Ogaden basin blocs 7-8 and its Adigala lease with its Canadian oil firm partner Africa Oil. For the moment, Ethiopia is pressing forward with its grandiose hydroelectric plans, most notably the $4.2 billion, 6,000-megawatt Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam on the Blue Nile, which has unsettled Egypt. Egypt fears that the dam’s completion would diminish 20 percent of its Nilotic water flow, leading Cairo last month to demand Ethiopia suspend construction work on the dam on the Nile’s main tributary. After Ethiopia rejected Egypt's demand Egypt vowed to protect its "historical rights" to the Nile "at any cost." 


A Wretched of the Earth Ethiopian Genius
February 26, 2014

The Ancient Egyptian Kemetic creation theory and the Big Bang creation theory of the universe have something in common: Void. Out of nothing (empty space) came out something. This Ethiopian genius, whose name is Ishak Ayiris also came out from an impoverished Ethiopian parents, who had nothing and who were in fact wretched of the earth, to borrow Fanon’s book title. Ishak has now a bright future and the Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA), with pleasure, brings the story of Ishak Ayiris to the attention of its readers. Please read!
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/eton-college-council-estate-kid-3185903 


Critique on and Supplement to Bank Sector Reform in Ethiopia

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD   February 24, 2014

This essay, as its title suggests, intends to critique and supplement Bank Sector Reform in Ethiopia by Drs. Desta Asayehgn and Admassu Bezabeh that was published by (IDEA) Inc. (www.africanidea.org/Banking_sector_in_Ethiopia.html). I found their abstract interesting, especially in some parts where the authors present sound arguments and are leveled against government policies as constructive criticism, and I will endorse the ideas that I agree with. On some of their ideas, however, I have different views, reservations and disagreements; hence I will critique those ideas in an effort to make input and insight for future considerations. 


THE NILE WATER ISSUE AND…
A PEACEFUL SOLUTION SUGGESTED MANY YEARS AGO…

Open Letter to Prime Minister Meles Zenawi
by G. E. Gorfu

H.E. Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, Sir: The BBC's Mike Thomson (Feb. 3, 2005) reports: "Mr. Meles says he is becoming increasingly angry at Egypt's long running objections to requests from other Nile basin nations to use the river's waters for major irrigation projects… While Egypt is taking the Nile water to transform the Sahara Desert into something green, we in Ethiopia - who are the source of 85% of that water - are denied the possibility of using it to feed ourselves. And we are being forced to beg for food every year..."1


Ethiopian origin in Seattle at Yesler Community Center pledge to buy bonds

Ethiopian observer staff

On February 16, 2014 at Yesler Community Center in Seattle,  Ethiopians welcomed high ranking officials accompanied by Deputy the Consul General Consulate General of Ethiopia Weizero Mebrat Beyane, Weizero  Fikerte Tamir W/Agegnehue Civil Associations and other Structure & Event Organization Directorate Directors, and Ato Zadig  Abraha, Coordination of Public Participation on the Construction of the Grand Renaissance Dam, and the Deputy General Director to discuss about the Millennium Dam which will be the largest hydroelectric power plant in Africa when completed and create one of the continent’s largest reservoirs. As speakers noted after the completion of the Millennium Dam, we Ethiopians will restore our past glory and contribute, not only transforming the lives of our people, but also improving the climate of our continent by producing  clean energy to our neighbors. In June, a panel of international experts tasked with studying the impacts of the Ethiopian dam on lower riparian countries, including Sudan and Egypt, found that the dam project will not cause significant harm to either country.



Banking Sector Reform in Ethiopia: An Abstract


Admassu Bezabeh, Ph.D, School of Business and Leadership, Dominican University of California San Rafael, California 


Desta, Asayehgn, Ph.D. School of Business and Leadership , Dominican University of California, San Rafael, California.
 
The fragile and inefficient state-dominated banking sector that existed in Ethiopia during the military government (1974-1991) was a major hindrance to economic growth. Since it took power in 1991, the current government has implemented a number of reforms. For instance, in 1994, the government legalized domestic private investment in the banking industry. In addition, it restructured the two development banks as commercial banks, and introduced a new Banking and Monetary Proclamation that gave more autonomy and further clarified the National Bank of Ethiopia’s activities as the regulator and supervisor of the banking sector. 


Press release: What is working to end FGM in East Africa

“An estimated 3 million girls in Africa are at risk of female genital mutilation (FGM) every year. In other words a girl is cut every 10 seconds. This is a shocking and shameful statistic as FGM is already recognised as a human rights violation and there are laws against it in most of the countries where it takes place,” says Dr Ann-Marie Wilson, Executive Director of anti FGM charity 28 Too Many. “This is an international problem requiring urgent action in all countries where FGM is practised.”


Economist: Manufacturing in Africa: An Awakening Giant
February 7, 2014 

A quiet boom in manufacturing in Africa is already taking place. Farming and services are still dominant, backed by the export of commodities, but new industries are emerging in a lot of African countries." Less than an hour's drive outside Ethiopia's capital, Addis Ababa, a farmer walks along a narrow path on a green valley floor after milking his cows. Muhammad Gettu is carrying two ten-litre cans to a local market, where he will sell them for less than half of what they would fetch at a dairy in the city. Sadly, he has no transport. A bicycle sturdy enough to survive unpaved tracks would be enough to double his revenues. At the moment none is easily available. But that may be about to change. A construction boom is fostering access to high-voltage power. The spread of mobile telephony, including mobile banking, helps small suppliers struggling with overheads. IBM, an American computer giant with an eye on Africa, goes so far as to say that “software is the manufacturing of the future”. Consumers will still want to buy hardware, but growing local demand is creating a market for African app and software developers


Ethiopia and Egypt spar over the Nile
By Hassen Hussein 

Al Jazeera Opinion

On Jan. 8, Ethiopia turned down Egypt’s demand that it suspend construction of its mega-dam on the Nile, further escalating tensions between the two states. Fearing that Ethiopia’s $4.2 billion project would reduce the river’s flow, Egypt calls for a halt in construction until the dam’s downstream impact is determined. Otherwise, it has vowed to protect its “historical rights” to the Nile at “any cost.” While scoffing at Egyptian threats, Ethiopia has called for Cairo’s collaboration in negotiations and claims that the dam will have no adverse effect on Egypt. It would, in fact, decrease evaporation and improve water flow. Ethiopia hopes that the ambitious hydroelectric project, slated to be completed in 2017, would catapult the country out of poverty. Frustrated by what it described as Ethiopia’s stubborn stance, Cairo is threatening to take the issue to the United Nations Security Council.


Ethiopia and Egypt clash over mega-dam - UPI
KHARTOUM, Sudan, Feb. 7 (UPI) -- Egypt and Ethiopia remain at loggerheads over Addis Ababa's plan to build a $4.2 billion, 6,000-megawatt dam on a major tributary of the Nile River that Cairo says will greatly reduce the flow of water that is Egypt's lifeline. Tension between the two African states rose sharply in January after Ethiopia rejected Egypt's demand it suspend construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam on the Blue Nile, the main tributary of the 4,130-mile river, the world's longest. Egypt has vowed to protect its "historical rights" to the Nile "at any cost" and says it could lose 20 percent of its water if the giant dam in northwestern Ethiopia, one of several hydroelectric projects planned by Addis Ababa, is completed.


Robert Reich Explains the War on the Poor and Working Families
By Nick Berning. Friday, February 7 2014

Connect the dots between policies that keep many of our fellow Americans desperate, and you’ll see they add up to a war on the poor and working families. Robert Reich explains:


Analysis of Kaizen Implementation

in Northern Ethiopia’s Manufacturing Industries

Desta, Asayehgn, Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Dominican University of California;  and Hadush Berhe Asgedom, lecturer, Industrial Engineering Program;  Alula Gebresas, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering Program; and Mengstu Asheber, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering Program, Makelle University, Tigrai, Ethiopia

Abstract

From the ashes of the Second World War, Japan through its culturally embedded innovative management system has succeeded in rebuilding an economy that is emulated by the community of nations (Waheed, etal., 2010). For example, in the 1980s, the manufacturing industry in Japan showed a significant growth through the adoption of the kaizen process of management. The key elements of the Japanese management system and the kaizen strategy were embedded to achieve a never-ending journey towards increasing productivity, and efficiency, and to foster the spirit of quality improvement. In order to stay competitive in an increasingly global marketplace with increasing customer demands, by following Japan’s example, a number of Ethiopian-based manufacturing  companies are using the kaizen management approach to lower costs of production, minimize waste, improve productivity, boost quality, and achieve sustainability


Telecom Deal by China ZTE, Huawei In Ethiopia Faces Criticism 
For Ethiopians, a Chinese Telecom Project Changes Lives but Draws Scrutiny
By MATTHEW DALTON


Eight Business Benefits of Resuming Economic Relations Between Ethiopia and Eritrea –

 By Tony Carroll   Contributor: Natnael A / January 31, 2014 
Ethiopia and Eritrea ceased business relations upon the commencement of the border war in 1998. While a small amount of barter trade still exists, it is fair to say that trade relations between the two countries are non-existent – this is very much to the detriment of the private sectors in both countries (and across the region). - See more at: s reported by my friends Ambassadors Cohen, Shinn and Lyman, this appears to be a moment of inflection in the relationship between Eritrea and Ethiopia. Certainly the implementation of the border agreement and the resumption of commercial relations will not be an easy process. However, the economic benefits that would accrue to both countries could be substantial and should motivate leadership in both to expedite the process. - See more at: 


Increase the Ethiopia ICT
Monday, February 3rd, 2014 

Monica Chung (info@koreaittimes.com) 
SEOUL, KOREA - This is a freedom story all the world should have to know.
2It all starts in July 25, 1950 when war broke out in Korea. The Korean war kills about 1.4 million soldiers and 374,00 civilians. the only reason of the war was the need of freedom by the Korean people. At that time crossing 15,000 kilometers distance to participate in the foreign country war was almost impossible. Its difficult to think the present Korean advancement and development without the help of 1270 Ethiopian soldiers who came to Korean land to maintain peace and freedom.


Global Voices: Stemming the African brain drain
Times Colonist January 24, 2014 

Last year the Canadian health-care system managed to save $400 million — by poaching trained doctors from the poorest and most vulnerable communities in the world. A recent study by the University of Ottawa indicates that even as Canadian aid programs help Africa to build better health-care systems, our health-care system is taking away their doctors. According to Canada-based CUSO International, between 1990 and 2006, Ethiopia trained 3,700 doctors. Only 700 of them stayed to work there. Africa’s health-care system isn’t the only sector hemorrhaging skilled workers — there are more African-born engineers and scientists living in Canada and the U.S. than in all of Africa. - See more 


War tops talks as African leaders gather in Ethiopia for AU summit
Source: AFP

ADDIS ABABA — Conflict and humanitarian crises rather than growing economies and development top the agenda for African leaders this week as they meet for a summit of the continental bloc.
War in the Central African Republic (CAR) and South Sudan are key priorities, Ethiopian Foreign Minister Tedros Adhanom said ahead of the two-day African Union (AU) meeting that opens on Thursday. The controversial role on the continent of the International Criminal Court (ICC) is also expected to be addressed.


Ethiopia: "Time to bring back Eritrea from the cold" - A reply to Ambassador Cohen
Ethiopia: "Time to bring back Eritrea from the cold"

A reply to Ambassador Cohen 
By Minga Negash* 

Many observers agree that recent unfortunate developments in the Middle East can easily spillover to the Greater Horn of Africa region. There are groups that are fanning ideologies advanced by the various actors in Middle East’s sectarian conflict. In the light of the new developments in the region, it makes sense for the United States to review its relationship with Eritrea and Ethiopia and rebalance its portfolio. The interesting question for Eritrea and Ethiopia is therefore how to respond to the apparent shift in superpower policy towards the region. In this rejoinder I review the recent articles that were written by two former Ambassadors, examine the difficult areas in the relationship between Eritrea and Ethiopia, and outline the options that are available for Ethiopia.


First broadcast: Brain drain Ethiopian Docators

Wednesday 06 April 2011Migration of trained medical staff is an issue faced by countries all over the world. But Ethiopia’s brain drain has left just one doctor for nearly 30,000 people. How can a country with some of the worst health problems cope with such a loss of its human health resources? Even fewer doctors work in rural regions where the majority of the country’s population lives. So what’s driving doctors away and what measures are being taken to keep them in the country? 
     Claudia Hammond travels to Ethiopia to find out more about their medical brain drain. There she meets medical students to find out why they want to work abroad. She meets the country’s Health Minister to find out about his measures to keep doctors in the country and why he hopes quadrupling the number of medical students helps tackle the problem. She also talks to a general practitioner working in Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa to find out what working life for an Ethiopian doctor is really like


press release 
Jan. 27, 2014, 6:01 a.m. EST 

Tigray Announces Initial Terakimti Mineral Resource Estimate at the Harvest Project in Ethiopia
VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, Jan 27, 2014 (Marketwired via COMTEX) -- Tigray Resources Inc. CA:TIG +25.00% ("Tigray" or the "Company") is pleased to announce its initial National Instrument 43-101 Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects ("NI 43-101") compliant gold, copper, silver and zinc mineral resource estimate for the Terakimti volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposit on the Company's 70%-owned Harvest project (the "Harvest Project") located in the Arabian Nubian Shield in northern Ethiopia. This mineral resource estimate is contained within the first prospect discovered at the Harvest Project in 2009 and incorporates 16,495 metres of drilling in 79 diamond drill holes


Move over quinoa, Ethiopia's teff poised to be next big super grain
Rich in calcium, iron and protein, gluten-free teff offers Ethiopia the promise of new and lucrative markets in the west.
At Addis Ababa airport, visitors are greeted by pictures of golden grains, minute ochre-red seeds and a group of men gathered around a giant pancake. Billboards boast: "Teff: the ultimate gluten-free crop!"Ethiopia is one of the world's poorest countries, well-known for its precarious food security situation. But it is also the native home of teff, a highly nutritious ancient grain increasingly finding its way into health-food shops and supermarkets in Europe and America.Teff's tiny seeds – the size of poppy seeds – are high in calcium, iron and protein, and boast an impressive set of amino acids. Naturally gluten-free, the grain can substitute for wheat flour in anything from bread and pasta to waffles and pizza bases. Like quinoa, the Andean grain, teff's superb nutritional profile offers the promise of new and lucrative markets in the west.


A Special Love for Assimba:  A Psychological Catharsis for 'Kahsay Abraha Besrat'

Asayehgn Desta, Sarlo Distinguished Professor Sustainable Economic Development January 4, 2014, I drove from San Rafael to Oakland, California, for about forty-five minutes to have a get-together dinner with one of my best friends, Kidane Haile and learn more about the innovative projects that he is undertaking in Kenya, Nigeria and Morocco.  In the course of our discussion, the owner of the restaurant came and showed us a book entitled “Ya Assimba Fekere” or My Special Love for Assimba.”


Ethiopian Foreign Policy & How the Delicate Balance of diplomacy and negotiation should be maintained

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD                                  

IDEA Editorial January 25, 2014

Since the beginnings of people-to-people and state-to-state interaction thousands of years ago, the Horn of Africa has always been a troubled region and by comparison the most volatile and unstable area in Africa. The impetus behind these continuous conflicts is partly induced by geopolitics and foreign intervention and partly engendered by complex mode of productions as well as the mindset and lack of vision of the people.  


South Sudan, rebels sign cease-fire
By ELIAS MESERET 

The Associated Press  ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — 
South Sudan's government and rebels signed a cease-fire deal Thursday that leaders hope will put a pause to five weeks of warfare that has killed thousands of soldiers and civilians. The peace deal represents the first real progress since political friction turned violent Dec. 15, fueling countrywide battles with ethnic overtones. But questions were immediately raised about whether all fighters in South Sudan would abide by the agreement, and how long others would follow it.


Africa: White House On U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit
By Office of the Press Secretary, 21 January 2014 

The White House is pleased to announce that the United States will host the first U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit in Washington, DC on August 5 and 6, 2014. President Obama looks forward to welcoming leaders from across the African continent to the Nation's Capital to further strengthen ties with one of the world's most dynamic and fastest-growing regions. The Summit will build on the progress made since the President's trip to Africa last summer, advance the Administration's focus on trade and investment in Africa, and highlight America's commitment to Africa's security, its democratic development, and its people.


In vigilant defense of press freedom
The Ethiopian Reporter

Article 29 of the Ethiopian constitution explicitly guarantees freedom of the press and provides that the press shall, as an institution, enjoy legal protection to ensure its operational independence and its capacity to entertain diverse opinions. This provision is a replica of Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Article 29 enshrines the right to hold opinions without interference, as well as the right to freedom of expression without any interference including freedom to seek, receive and impart information through any medium of one’s choice. It also prohibits any form of censorship and stipulates that any citizen who violates any legal limitations on the exercise of these rights may be held liable under the law.


WATER IS LIFE… FIGHTING FOR THE NILE WATERS
by G. E. GORFU

If the case is decided in favor of Ethiopia and the other rightful owners of the Nile, it is doubtful Egypt will quietly accept and abide by that decision either, and is most likely to declare a war. It is imperative, therefore, and of the highest importance, that Ethiopia and the other Nile nations immediately form a united front and prepare for that eventuality, to defend themselves by any and all means against an aggressor that seems only too eager to declare a war. This issue might still have to be decided on the battlefield, and the final chapter written in blood on the sands of the Egyptian desert.


Egypt may take Nile dam dispute with Ethiopia to UN
After all attempts to solve the Egyptian-Ethiopian crisis over the Renaissance Dam at the negotiating table ended in failure after a third round of negotiations on Jan. 4, with Egypt withdrawing from the discussions and conferences being held in Khartoum, there is now talk at the governmental level about internationalizing the issue. At the same time, Egypt is witnessing rising popular demands to resort to the UN Security Council to establish Egypt’s right to veto the establishment of the Renaissance Dam, given the potential danger it represents to Egyptian water security.


Ethiopian Emperor Places Wreath on Dr. King’s Grave 
Haile Selassie Visited Atlanta Tomb of Civil Rights Leader July 11, 1969 A.P

Happy Birthday (Tribute Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday) -- St 


The desperate and hostile nature of Egyptian move against Ethiopia
Posted by Awramba Times on January 21, 2014 

By W.Yilma
Egyptian relation with Ethiopia lack coherence and logic. Leave alone for political observers, it is not hard for ordinary person to understand the desperate, demonic and deceptive motives of the Egyptian “politicians” towards Ethiopia when it comes to the Nile water issues. We are witnessing to observe the infantile and uncivilized diplomatic maneuverings and dirty games the Egyptians are perusing for many years. The Egyptian traditional animosity became more apparent since the start of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) construction.


Ethiopia: Keepers of the Lost Ark?
Ed's Note: This article was first published in 2007.

Christians in Ethiopia have long claimed to have the ark of the covenant. Our reporter investigated
By Paul Raffaele
SMITHSONIAN MAGAZINE 

"They shall make an ark of acacia wood," God commanded Moses in the Book of Exodus, after delivering the Israelites from slavery in Egypt. And so the Israelites built an ark, or chest, gilding it inside and out. And into this chest Moses placed stone tablets inscribed with the Ten Commandments, as given to him on Mount Sinai. Thus the ark “was worshipped by the Israelites as the embodiment of God Himself,” writes Graham Hancock in The Sign and the Seal. "Biblical and other archaic sources speak of the Ark blazing with fire and light...stopping rivers, blasting whole armies." (Steven Spielberg's 1981 film Raiders of the Lost Ark provides a special-effects approximation.) According to the First Book of Kings, King Solomon built the First Temple in Jerusalem to house the ark. It was venerated there during Solomon's reign (c. 970-930 B.C.) and beyond.


Beyond remittances, diaspora and development
By IRIN | Thursday, January 9 2014 

The African diaspora and migrants have for years been instrumental in helping family and friends at home get by, as huge annual remittance flows illustrate, but their contributions beyond remittances could have a significant impact on development, if tapped into. According to the World Bank, African diaspora savings, at $53 billion every year, exceed annual remittances to the continent and are mostly invested abroad." If one in every 10 members of the diaspora could be persuaded to invest $1,000 in his or her country of origin, Africa could raise $3 billion a year for development financing,” Dilip Ratha and Sonia Plaza write in the World Bank’s 2011 report, Diaspora for Development in Africa.


Renaissance dam right on track: Ethiopia irrigation minister 
Contradicting earlier statements by Egypt Irrigation Ministry official, Ethiopian minister says on Monday Grand Renaissance Dam faces neither financial nor technical problems Ethiopian Minister of Irrigation and Energy Alemayehu Tegenu said on Monday the process of building the Ethiopian Grand Renaissance Dam was on track without difficulties, adding that the project will be completed on schedule. The Ethiopian minister's words contrast with statements made by the Egyptian Irrigation Ministry Spokesman Khaled Waseef who, on 8 January, said in a press statement the Ethiopian Grand Renaissance Dam faces financial as well as technical problems, as reported by MENA.


King Menelik Has Investments Here November 7, 1909

Abyssinia’s Ruler said to be a Heavy Buyer of America Railways Stock

Today the Abyssinian ruler has extended the range of his financial operations to the United States, and is a heavy investor in American Railroads. What with his American Securities and his French and Belgian mining investments. Menelik has a private fortune estimated at no less than twenty- five million dollars.



The new face of agriculture in arid Ethiopia?

By ANDUALEM SISAY in Addis Ababa | Wednesday, January 1 Source Africa Review
On a sunny afternoon in Huruta Dore town some 200 kilometers south-east of the capital Addis Ababa young riders on their motorbikes noisily kick up some dust. They are the emerging generation of well-to-do farmers of Ethiopia who are reaping from using irrigation. Found in Arsi zone of the Oromia region of the country, this semi-desert town has been known as a drought area, with the inhabitants used to relying on wheat aid. Today, its over 500 hectares of land is teeming with a rich cover of various crops and vegetables. Due to the regional government diverting the Awash River to pass through the town five years ago, it is no longer desert.


A Proven Strategy to End Conflict in South Sudan
By Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Kulwant Singh and Dr. David Leffler

A new technology of defense is now available that has been scientifically shown to prevent war and create peace by harnessing the deepest level of nature's functioning.
War is ultimately a human problem requiring a human solution. Experts in the field of conflict resolution maintain that the underlying cause of war is accumulated "social stress" - i.e., mounting political, religious and/or ethnic tensions between rival factions in critical hotspots throughout the world. As social stress builds, divisions grow stronger, groups take sides, diplomats become unable to resolve differences, and enemies arise within or outside the nation.


An open letter to an inquisitive young Ethiopian sister 
Ethiopian history is not three thousand years!

Dear Beloved Ethiopian Sister,
Thank you very much for your important question about the origin and extent of Ethiopian history.
Thank you for inspiring me to write this response.  I am prompted to write the response to your question in a public forum. I do so because many of your doubting friends to whom you refer would also be able to see my answers. You write, “Edeminot, I would like to ask you something if you have [the] time. [Many] people … specially the young…have doubts about our 3000 years history … they ask [for] evidence... Some comment that[one ethnic group] wrote the history like they want… [But] they doubt if our history is even 100 years…. Can you suggest [to] me [a] good book… about Ethiopia?


Reflections on Africa Competitiveness Report 2013

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

December 27, 2013

The Africa Competitiveness Report 2013, put out by the World Economic Forum (WE Forum), is a comprehensive analysis and critique of the overall development status of thirty-eight African countries. It has also recommendations on how Africa can uplift itself and successfully become part of the global economy. Based on the World Bank and the African Development Bank (AfDB) data base and recommendations, the Report makes a thorough assessment of African countries’ economic parameters, ranging from their use of information technology to regional integration in the context of other successful countries outside Africa, as well as developed nations that could become major foreign direct investment (FDI) potentials. 


Ethiopian history is not three thousand years! (Ephraim Isaac, PhD)
Posted by admin on December 28, 2013 

You write, “Edeminot, I would like to ask you something if you have [the] time. [Many] people … specially the young…have doubts about our 3000 years history … they ask [for] evidence… Some comment that[one ethnic group] wrote the history like they want… [But] they doubt if our history is even 100 years…. Can you suggest [to] me [a] good book… about Ethiopia? Thank you, Sir”[M.B.]
I have always known young Ethiopians to be bright and inquisitive. Over 600 years ago it was written in Mashafa Berhan (please see my own translation The Book of Light, EJ Brill,1973) from Emperor Zar’aYa’eqob (1434-68) time: “all the peoples of Ethiopia are thirsty for knowledge”. So, I am really not surprised to know that our young continue the ancient tradition of our people to be thirsty for knowledge. I am especially happy that they are inquisitive about our common history. May the Almighty bless them and open the door for them to learn and teach.


Egypt's minister says new Ethiopian dam won’t affect Egypt’s water supply
Source: Daily News Egypt

Minister Mohamed Abdel Moteleb says a new dam in Gondar will not affect water flow to Lake Nasser
The construction of a new dam in Ethiopia will not affect the supply of water flowing to Egypt, said Egyptian Minister of Irrigation and Water Resources on Saturday.
Construction on the Megech Dam, located near the Ethiopian city of Gondar, began earlier this month and has been allocated funding of approximately USD $125m, according to privately-owned Ethiopian Walta and its Information and Public Relations Center. The dam is planned to hold 1.8 billion cubic metres of water when it is constructed, and will be used for irrigation purposes and drinking water for Gondar.


Research uncovers lost African school of painting
Analysis of illuminated gospels suggests that first Christian manuscript art may have come from Ethiopia

By Martin Bailey. News, Issue 252, December 2013


Evidence has emerged for a previously unknown school of painting in sub-Saharan Africa that may have been responsible for the earliest Christian paintings in manuscripts. New research suggests that illuminations in two Ethiopian gospels dating back 1,500 years were painted in the ancient kingdom of Aksum, and not in the Middle East, as previously believed.  These illustrations, which include a set of the Evangelists, are evidence of an Aksumite School of painting, says Jacques Mercier, a specialist in Ethiopian art at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Paris. Aksum lies in northern Ethiopia. If Mercier’s theory is correct, it sheds new light on the development of early Christian art.


Ethiopia: Djibouti Gives Ethiopia Cargo Ultimatum
By Tamrat G. Giorgis, 15 December 2013

Release of cargo will change come January, according to the ultimatum, which some believe to be in breach of a bilateral agreement. The government of Djibouti has given a deadline of January 15, 2014, for challenging the manner in which cargo is released from its ports. The new rules will state that no cargo inbound to Ethiopia will be released until the clearing agent in Djibouti produces a note from banks stating that foreign exchange to pay for transport, transit and forwarding services has actually been transferred. A circular instructing offices in Djibouti to this effect has been distributed by the government, according to diplomatic sources in Djibouti.


Eritrea: Time to Bring Eritrea in From the Cold
By Hank Cohen, 16 December 2013 
analysis

After being part of Ethiopia for forty years, the people of Eritrea held a referendum in April 1993 and decided to establish an independent state. The referendum took place in the aftermath of a thirty-year insurgency against two successive Ethiopian regimes waged by the Eritrean Peoples Liberation Front (EPLF). At the same time, an allied insurgent group, the Tigrean Peoples Liberation Front (TPLF), took over power in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, after the military collapse of the Soviet-supported regime headed by President Mengistu Haile Mariam.


Ethiopia: Gilgel Gibe III Near Completion - to Go Operational in September
17 December 2013 

One of the biggest power generating projects in Ethiopia, the Gilgel Gibe III, is expected to go fully operational on September 2014. H.E. Ato Alemayehu Tegenu, Minister of Water, Irrigation and Energy said that so far 80% of construction work has been completed. One of the power projects planned to be commissioned within the GTP period, the Gilgel Gibe III will add 1,870MW electric power to the national grid upon its completion in September. 


“No political motive” behind Sudan’s support for Ethiopia’s Nile dam: ambassador
By Tesfa-Alem Tekle

December 14, 2013 (ADDIS ABABA) – Sudan’s support to Ethiopia’s controversial dam project is not politically driven, Sudan’s ambassador to Ethiopia said on Friday.


The 5 Poorest Countries in the World
by Dan Carroll, The Motley Fool Dec 14th 2013 3:05PM
Updated Dec 14th 2013 
4: Eritrea, $705 GDP per capita


Ethiopia continues to be shaped by its long history and its policy

Ethiopian Observer editors

A wonderful spectacle and a colorful Ethiopia-Somali origin State, hosted the 8th Nations and Nationalities Day on Sunday in Seattle at the Kings Hall. The celebration was attended by the Honorable Ambassador Zerihun Retta, Consul General of Ethiopia at Los Angeles, the newly appointed former Director of Ethiopian Diaspora General Directorate of Ministry of Foreign Affairs Weizero Mebrat Beyane and over 350 Ethiopians. The Ethiopian Somalia community invited all Ethiopians in Seattle to celebrate the economic and political rights that have been guaranteed under the constitutional framework. The Ethiopian Somalis underscored the degree of liberty they have gained in education and economic opportunity. One of the highlights of the event that captured the imagination of the audience was the enthusiastic and upbeat attitude of the future generations’ promise to lead Ethiopia to prosperity. Each youth expressed what it takes to be a leader is respect, responsibility and to value your own culture and other cultures in order to create a social harmony that leads to solid foundation.


The man who taught Mandela to be a soldierBy Penny Dale
BBC Africa, Addis Ababa

In July 1962, Col Fekadu Wakene taught South African political activist Nelson Mandela the tricks of guerrilla warfare - including how to plant explosives before slipping quietly away into the night.
Mr Mandela was in Ethiopia, learning how to be the commander-in-chief of Umkhonto we Sizwe - the armed wing of the African National Congress (ANC).The group had announced its arrival at the end of 1961 by blowing-up electricity pylons in various places in South Africa. Continue reading the main story “Then on 11 January 1962, Mr Mandela had secretly, and illegally, slipped out of South Africa. 
His mission was to meet as many African political leaders as possible and garner assistance for the ANC, including money and training for its military wing. And to be moulded into a soldier himself. During this trip, he visited Ethiopia twice and left a deep impression on those who met him during his stay in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa.


Israel's "Red Cross"' rejects blood from Ethiopia born lawmaker
AFP

 Jerusalem — The refusal of Israel's equivalent of the Red Cross to accept blood from an Ethiopian Jewish lawmaker sparked demands on Wednesday for a review of guidelines seen as deeply discriminatory.The rejection of the blood from Pnina Tamano-Shata by an official of Magen David Adom came at a donor drive outside parliament and was caught on video footage which was widely aired by Israeli television channels."Under health ministry directives, we are unable to accept blood from donors of Ethiopian Jewish origin," the health official is heard to say as he spurns the donation.
Top Magen David Adom officials later agreed they could take Tamano-Shata's blood, but only to freeze it, not to put it into the national blood bank, the Ynet news website reported


Somalia: U.S. Blames Eritrea Still Supporting Al Shabab Militant Group in Somalia
December 9, 2013 

The U.S state department has blamed again that Eritrea is still supporting Somalia's militant group Al Shabab. A report by the state department has blamed that Eritrean officials were in Somalia's Lower Shabelle region to give training and other mechanical support to Al Shabab fighters in Somalia, battling against the Federal Government forces and the African Union troops (AMISOM). The report did not name the individuals from Eritrea in Somalia. Also Somali Government sources could not confirm the existence of such Eritrean presence in its territory. Eritrea has been always blamed for supporting the militant group of Al Shabab, a claim Asmara regime constantly denied.


A new species of horse, 4.4 million years old
CLEVELAND—Two teams of researchers, including a scientist from Case Western Reserve University, have announced the discovery of a new species of fossil horse from 4.4 million-year-old fossil-rich deposits in Ethiopia. About the size of a small zebra, Eurygnathohippus woldegabrieli—named for geologist Giday WoldeGabriel, who earned his PhD at Case Western Reserve in 1987—had three-toed hooves and grazed the grasslands and shrubby woods in the Afar Region, the scientists say.


Members of the Ethiopian Diaspora residing in Seattle will celebrate the Ethiopian Nations, Nationalities and People's Day at Kings Hall 2929 27th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98144 December 15, 2013 at 2.00PM  

Cultural Exchange Festival of Nations and Nationalities in Jijiga 

Ethiopia Somali Regional State, Jijiga Hostsed the 8th Nations and Nationalities Day on Sunday at the Capital of Jigjiga Somali Regional State. To be recall the celebration was attended by Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, Djiboutian President Ismail Omar Guelleh and observers from Rwanda and Kenya. Among the key note speakers were Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, Speaker of the House of Federation, Kassa Tekleberhan, Head of Somali Regional Sate, Abdi Mohammed Umer and Mayor of Jijiga. The Ethiopian Somalian community invites all Ethiopians in Seattle to celebrate the economic and political rights that have been guaranteed under the constitutional framework. Ambassador Zerihun Retta Consulate General of Ethiopia in LA and other ranking officials will be present.

Address: Kings Hall 2929 27th Ave S, Seattle, WA 98144 December 15, 2013 at 2.00PM

The Ethiopian Somalis know very well the degree of liberty they have gained. It is the price of their struggle that blossom. For the first time of Ethiopian history, Ethiopia is able to make commitment to eradicate discrimination guarantying the rights of nationalities self-determination principle of recognition. For majority of Ethiopian nationalities such arrangement is a keystone to eliminate inequalities and subjection of other dominant culture. Ethiopia will and can survival as a political entity only through recognized and understood civil and political right. One way the other the point is protecting the rights of nationalities to choose the political, economic and cultural autonomy without interference any form of imposition have created an atmosphere of solid unity and stability to propel Ethiopia as fast growing economy in the world.


Next on Egypt's to-do: Ethiopia and the Nile
Last updated: 15 hours ago

 Water ministers meet in Sudan for latest round of talks on how to share Africa's fabled river.
Play a game of word association almost anywhere in the world, and if you try the word "Nile", the answer will be "Egypt". Herodotus famously said the country was a gift of the fabled river, and it's no exaggeration - given that Egypt is almost totally dependent on the Nile for water and agriculture. But upstream of Cairo, there's a country where the answer to the word association wouldn't be Egypt - where the people don't even call the it the Nile, and where more than 85 percent of the river's water originates. That place is Ethiopia, and it has enraged Egypt by starting to build a huge dam on the river.


Ethiopia and Eritrea: Brothers at war no more 
New internal and external dynamics are shaping the relations between the two countries.
Last updated: 08 Dec 2013 

A refugee crisis, high-level defections, and a recent mutiny in the army, are some of many indications that Afwerki's regime is facing an existential threat that may lead to its demise in the near future. Afwerki is now on "survival mode" and may engage in new and desperate gestures to prolong his time in power, such as opening up to the international community for dialogue and humanitarian aid. However, if his past behavior is anything to go by, such moves are only likely to be tactical survival maneuvers that will not reverse the current political trajectory. It is now time to think about what the relationship between these two states will look like without the two omnipresent strongmen that have heavily shaped their histories.


Tribute to Nelson Madiba Mandela 
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD
December 5, 2013

The great Nelson Mandela has departed; he left us for good but his soul, his ideas, and his openly declared determination for the liberation of his fellow Africans lives on. He himself foretold his passing when he remarked on the death of Walter Sisulu ten years ago. Sisulu’s “passing was not unexpected,” said Mandela, “we had long passed the age when either of us would protest against the brevity of life.” I made reference to the above quote in my eulogy article entitled “Sharing Nelson Mandela’s Grief over the Death of Walter Sisulu” in 2003. In that article, this is what I said in part: 


Clash of Civilizations Conundrum and Controversy in The Ethiopian Context
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

December 4, 2013

This essay is intended to address some important issues surrounding 'clash of civilizations' as discussed by Seife Hailu in his article entitled "Is the war of the west equal to the war on the rest? What can we learn from the anti-Ethiopians "wars" in Saudi Arabia?" This article was posted on www.tigraionline.com on November 20, 2013. I am interested in thematically highlighting the points I have concerns with only. Otherwise, the author has done a good job in his overall approach to solving or dealing with a problem, and I like to extend my gratitude to him. In the latter spirit, thus, I am going to make some input by way of critiquing the conceptual framework of ‘clash of civilizations’


Genomics and African Queens: Diversity Within Ethiopian Genomes Reveals Imprints of Historical Events
June 21, 2012 — Researchers have started to unveil the genetic heritage of Ethiopian populations, who are among the most diverse in the world, and lie at the gateway from Africa. They found that the genomes of some Ethiopian populations bear striking similarities to those of populations in Israel and Syria, a potential genetic legacy of the Queen of Sheba and her companions.The team detected mixing between some Ethiopians and non-African populations dating to approximately 3,000 years ago. The origin and date of this genomic admixture, along with previous linguistic studies, is consistent with the legend of the Queen of Sheba, who according to the Ethiopian Kebra Nagast book had a child with King Solomon from Israel and is mentioned in both the Bible and the Qur'an.


Ethiopia hailed as 'African lion' with fastest creation of millionaires
Michael Buerk's famished Ethiopia of 1984 has become a nation achieving 93% GDP growth in six years, finds study. Dawn. And as the sun breaks through the piercing chill of night on the plain outside Korem it lights up a biblical famine, now, in the 20th century. This place, say workers here, is the closest thing to hell on earth. "That television news report by the BBC's Michael Buerk in 1984 framed Ethiopia for a generation as a place of famine and in need of salvation.

African millionaires

 


The Great Ethiopian Run: in the footsteps of Haile Gebrselassie
It's a crazy, joyous race at 2,300m above sea level in Addis Ababa, and it's the adrenaline as well as the altitude that leaves competitors breathless after the Great Ethiopian Run


Dear fellow Ethiopians, our people’s problems are way far from over. We need to continue to UNITE and address the situation carefully and in a professional manner.  This is the time to come together and help the raped, beaten, tortured and murdered and their families. Dear all, I respectfully urge each one of us to donate everything we can. Let us share the burdens of our brothers and sisters. Please continue to support the voiceless immigrants by:
1. Forward and encourage others to sign the petition http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/stop-violence-against-5?mailing_id=17122&source=s.icn.em.cr&r_

by=9515510


Saudi Arabia Doubles Down on Abuse
Dawit Giorgis [2], David Andrew Weinberg [3] 
November 22, 2013
There are an estimated nine million foreign workers in Saudi Arabia, mostly doing jobs that Saudis themselves do not want to take. And so far, the sudden crackdown is mainly just causing disruptions to Saudi Arabia’s national economy. According to a story in the [6] [6]Saudi Gazette [6], twenty thousand schools in the country are now short of janitors, and 40 percent of small construction firms have stopped operations. One observer even counted thirteen facilities for the religious ritual of washing dead bodies that had been shuttered in Jeddah because the workers responsible for this thankless task had been forced to flee.


Radicalism as a challenge to Ethiopia
By AMAN SETHI
Source: The HINDU

Sporadic outbursts of violence across Ethiopia show how state intervention in religion has alienated sections of Muslim youth and generated the kind of anti-regime sentiments the government had hoped to defuse A knock on the door well after midnight. Mohammed Hassan Abdalla opens the door to find that a posse of policemen have come for his elder brother, Sheikh Abdulsalam Abdalla, a preacher in the local mosque in this rural settlement of Wabe, 300 km southwest of the Ethiopian capital, of Addis Ababa.


Ethiopia rejects Egypt’s request to build Renaissance Dam jointly 
Al-Masry Al-Youm 

The Turkish Anadolu news agency reported on Wednesday that Ethiopia rejected a request by Egypt to jointly build all stages of the Renaissance Dam so as to make sure that Egypt’s share of Nile water is not affected. The agency quoted an Ethiopian diplomat that attended a meeting between Egyptian Interim President Adli Mansour and Ethiopian Prime Minister Mariam Desalegn on the sidelines of the Arab-African summit in Kuwait as saying that Desalegn adhered to the Entebbe Convention and rejected any Egyptian supervision or participation in the construction of the dam.


The Tragedy of the Ethiopians in Saudi Arabia

Ethiopian Observer editors

The killings, torture or inhuman treatment of fellow Ethiopians and the deaf ear of the West that claims they have the highest regard for Humanity, seems to have lost their collective conscience. What is happening in Saudi Arabia against Ethiopians gruesome torture, rape and killing is a tragedy that could have been easily avoided.  The more shocking cases over the past seven days cruel methods, not a single Western embassy is known to have protested nor has responsible African Union or international organization expressed concern over the Ethiopians vulnerability in the hands of coward Saudi forces and their thugs. 


Democratic State versus Developmental State:
Unraveling a False Dichotomy to Promote an Adaptive Democratic Developmental State
Asghedom G/Michael, PhD    Nov. 19, 2013


Stop the Killing and Torture of Migrant Workers in Saudi Arabia
author: Mohammed Nurhussein

Saudi Arabia has an obligation to protect the migrant workers under its jurisdiction. Tell them to stop the crackdown and start working to protect immigrant workers from these appalling conditions!


Zakaria: The Saudis Are Mad? Tough! 
Why we shouldn't care that the world's most irresponsible country is displeased at the U.S.
 
By Fareed Zakaria 


Saudi Arabia continues its brutal crackdown on Ethiopian immigrants

Shocking video MILITARY beating and torturing foreigners

Shocking video: Saudi Arabia police torture Ethiopians

Secret Saudi executions shame the West 
Robert Fisk, Middle East Correspondent, reveals a frenzy of beheadings in the first of a series on women victims of Gulf 'justice'

Amid a frenzy of executions in the Arab Gulf states, at least 12 women have been put to death after Islamic trials, most of them publicly beheaded by the sword in Saudi Arabia. The majority of the executions were kept secret from all but spectators for fear of public reaction in the West, and followed unfair hearings which often denied the women a Defence lawyer. Among the more shocking cases over the past three years were a mother and her daughter who were decapitated together in front of an audience of men in a Dhahran market last August for allegedly killing the elder woman's husband. The nature of the Islamic trials and the cruel methods of execution call into question the morality of the West's military and political support for Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states whose supposedly civilised values were defended by 500,000 US, British and other Western troops after Iraq's invasion of Kuwait in 1990. Not a single Western embassy, however, is known to have protested at the beheading of women - nor at the increasingly ferocious lashing of hundreds of foreign female workers in the Gulf for alleged misdemeanors.


A another cruelty of Saudi Arabia a man waiting for Sentenced To Be Paralysed / Middle East News
Saudi Arabia owner is in the world is the most uncivilized punishments country, A man in waiting to be forcibly paralyzed in punishment for a crime which left his victim in a wheelchair , The Saudis are 

 still many members of the organization, but that the world should end. When he was 14, Ali al Khawaher stabbed a friend in the spine, paralysing him from the waist down, Amnesty International said. The London-based human rights group said Mr al Khawaher, now 24, has spent 10 years in jail waiting to be paralyzed surgically unless his family pays one million Saudi riyals (£180,000) to the victim. Amnesty said the case demonstrated the need for Saudi Arabia to review its laws to “start respecting their international obligations and remove these terrible punishments from the law”. Saudi judges have in the past ordered Sharia punishments that included tooth extraction, flogging, eye gouging and – in murder cases – death.


EXPULSION OF SAUDI ARABIA FROM THE UNITED NATIONS
By Tecola W. Hagos

NB: This article was written almost ten years ago and posted in www.tecolahagos.com. It is a voice of prophecy and acute observation of the State of Saudi Arabia, Its ruling autocracy, and the characteristics of Saudis. This is a nation of abominable subhuman creatures should be completely isolated from the rest of humankind and dissolved in its own oil filth. TWH 
The governments of the World community cannot simply make sanctimonious public statements and do nothing by way of taking effective action to stop the enslavement and degradation of human beings in Arab Countries cited in the Report of the State Department. There are both treaty-based principles dealing with human rights issues and customary international law principles that provide us the legal regime to demand that the World community take steps against the Saudi Government and others for their violations of human rights. 


Africans decry 'discrimination' in India 
Murder of a Nigerian in Goa turns spotlight on African community, many of whom say they face unfair treatment.
Elizabeth Soumya Last updated: 14 Nov 2013 

Ties between India and Nigeria have hit a new low in the aftermath of the recent murder of a Nigerian in the western Indian state of Goa.The killing led to angry demonstrations by other Nigerian nationals in the state, besides triggering an ugly spat between Indian politicians and Nigerian envoys in the country. Following the murder and the subsequent arson, the authorities in Goa have embarked on a drive to detect and deport Nigerians living without valid visas. The drive has angered Nigerian embassy officials in New Delhi and evoked angry response. "There are only 50,000 Nigerians living in India, but there are over a million Indians living in Nigeria.Thousands of Indians living there will be thrown out on the streets if the forcible eviction of Nigerians in Goa does not stop," Jacob Nwadibia, an administrative attaché of the Nigerian high commission in New
....


Saudi Arabia, Russia and China Elected to UNHRC
Irony: Countries with questionable human rights records win seats on none other than the UN Human Rights Council.

By Elad Benari 

In a very ironic move, a host of countries with questionable human rights records on Tuesday won seats on none other than the UN Human Rights Council. Among the countries to win seats on the council are China, Russia, Algeria, Cuba, Vietnam and Saudi Arabia which came under fire from Amnesty International over its poor human rights record as recently as last month. AFP reported that the UN General Assembly elected 14 seats on the 47-member council which is taking on increased diplomatic importance because of Syria's civil war and other conflicts. In addition to the above, France and Britain returned to the Geneva-based body. South Africa, Morocco, Namibia, Maldives, Macedonia and Mexico also secured three year terms, according to AFP.


Saudi Arabia should be expelled from the UN & Ethiopia should take Serious Diplomatic Measures

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD
IDEA Editorial November 12, 2013

The Saudis may not be held responsible for what they do to their citizens, but they should not walk away with murder when they attack and brutalize other nationals. For this apparent reason, the Ethiopian Government should file charge against Saudi Arabia for the maiming, assault, rape, and murder of Ethiopian citizens. Moreover, Ethiopia should seriously reconsider its diplomatic ties with Saudi Arabia. Any nation’s independence is tested by its performance in securing the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the nation, and by safeguarding the fundamental rights of its citizens. 
If Saudi Arabia is not going to redeem the wrongful act wrought against Ethiopians and continues to violate international norms and breach international law in relation to human rights, the United Nations should consider to expel the country and terminate its membership unless and until it honors, respects, and implements the UN Declaration on Human Rights, and this by extension should apply to all other nations that breach international law with respect to human rights.


The recent episode that was perpetuated to those poor innocent immigrants in particular Ethiopians is a sad saga that needs worldwide attention. The Saudi are no strangers to such inhuman drama using unnecessary force. The question of human rights is one of that many Arab governments has persistently evaded or ignored. For many years the security of the immigrants has been ignored. Ethiopian Observer editors call upon Amnesty International and Africa Watch the atrocity being committed by Saudi force against those defenseless immigrants. Those vast immigrants are deprived the opportunity to repatriate in timely manner.  


Thousands of Ethiopians in Riyadh seek repatriation after riot
RIYADH: Thousands of mostly African workers gathered in Riyadh on Sunday seeking repatriation after two people were killed in overnight rioting that followed a visa crackdown by Saudi authorities.
One of those killed was a Saudi, said a government statement, and the other was not identified. An Ethiopian man was killed in a visa raid last week. Ethiopia’s foreign minister condemned the deaths, and told Reuters his government was working to bring its citizens home. “This is unacceptable. We call on the Saudi government to investigate this issue seriously. We are also happy to take our citizens, who should be treated with dignity while they are there,” Foreign Affairs Minister Tedros Adhanom said. He said Addis Ababa had formally complained to Riyadh and that embassy staff were working to help Ethiopians return home.


US companies awarded 300MW PV project in Ethiopia
Three solar power stations totalling 300MW will be built and operated in Ethiopia by two US companies, Global Trade and Development Consulting (GTDC) and Energy Ventures.

The Ethiopian Ministry of Water and Energy and directors at the Ethiopian Electric Power Corporation awarded the two Maryland companies the contracts for the three photovoltaic (PV) plants, each 100MW capacity in size. The three projects in Ethiopia, located in the eastern region of the country, were site selected and due diligence performed before receiving technical and financial approval from the two Ethiopian government bodies. The thee 100MW facilities, referred to collectively as the 300MW Solar Project, will create around 2,000 construction jobs. According to Energy Ventures, the project will inject “several million dollars into the Ethiopian economy”. The company claims that ongoing operations will also contribute several hundred jobs.


Earth, wind and water: Ethiopia bids to be Africa's powerhouse
By Oliver Joy for CNN

(CNN) -- Ethiopia is turning to renewable energy technology as the East African country looks to become a powerhouse for its regional partners. Last month, Ethiopia launched one of the continent's largest wind farms in a bid to rapidly boost its generating capacity over the next three to five years. Both developments will see Ethiopia's transition into one of the regions biggest energy exporters as electric output surges from 2,000 megawatts (MW) to 10,000 MW. More than half of this is expected to come from the Renaissance Dam. And with further commitments to geothermal power and potential for oil exploration, Ethiopia's energy resources are set to be among the most diversified in Africa.


Understanding Africa's water wars
By JANET OTIENO | Wednesday, November 6

The world is replete with cases of water being used as a weapon to score either political or socio-economic goals, especially if many countries share the common resource. So, what are some of the causes of the current water wars in Africa and what are their impact on the environment? Egypt and Ethiopia are going at each other’s throat over River Nile. Ethiopia is busy constructing a controversial dam, which Egypt complains will disrupt the river’s flow, with detrimental impact on its population that is almost entirely dependent on the Nile. Addis Ababa embarked on construction of the $4.2 billion Grand Ethiopia’s Renaissance Dam (GERD) with 6,000MW electric power generation capacity in April 2011, possibly taking advantage of the Arab Spring, that distracted Cairo.  This move angered Egypt so much that at one point Cairo threatened military action against Ethiopia, though the parties later agreed to dialogue over River Nile’s governance. 


Ethiopian Airlines Receives First of Four Boeing 777-300ERs
By Jesse Sokolow on 8 November 2013

Ethiopian Airlines announced that it took delivery of its first Boeing 777-300ER aircraft on Friday. The carrier said it will take delivery of three additional 777-300ERs in the coming months.The airline’s first 777-300ER is able to seat approximately 400 passengers in a two-class configuration. The aircraft also features Boeing Signature Interior, which offers wider seats and aisles, as well as more headroom and seating flexibility. The Boeing 777-300ER is the world’s largest long-range twin-engine jetliner. It has a range of 7,825 nautical miles (14,490 kilometers). Ethiopian Airlines serves 76 destinations across the globe. Earlier this year in August, the carrier took delivery of its first 787 Dreamliner.


Egypt and Ethiopia Disagree on Probe of Nile Dam Impact
By Ahmed Feteha & William Davison

Egypt called for international experts to help prepare a new study on the regional impact of a $4.2 billion dam in Ethiopia, which said a team made up of officials from the two nations and Sudan is 

enough.

Egypt wants “trusted international consultancies” to look into how the hydropower project on a tributary of the Nile River will affect the waterway’s flow well as safety issues, Egyptian Irrigation Minister Mohamed Abdel-Moteleb said after meeting his Sudanese and Ethiopian counterparts in Sudan’s capital, Khartoum, on Nov. 4. Ethiopian Water and Energy Minister Alemayehu Tegenu said including such a group was unnecessary after global experts completed a report earlier this year.


The Country That's Never Had an Election
Posted By Tiffany Lynch Wednesday, November 6, 2013 -


Source:.foreignpolicy.com

Eritrea, a country of roughly 6 million people on the Horn of Africa, is one of the world's most repressive states. There is no freedom of speech, press, or religion. Not a single election has been held since the country achieved independence two decades ago after a 30-year war with Ethiopia. Prolonged detention and torture are routine for any dissenters. And adults are forcibly conscripted mandatory military or national service that can last as long as the government decides. 
Yet despite Eritrea's ghastly human rights record, few human rights activists, policy makers, or world leaders ever mention the place.  Here are ten reasons why we should care about the state of human rights in this oft-forgotten corner of the world: 


Ethiopia among Lonely Planet’s 10 best value travel destinations for 2014
Ethiopia has been named as one of the 10 best value travel destinations for 2014 by Lonely Planet, the largest travel guide book publisher in the world. Ethiopia is 'one slice of Africa that rewards the curious as well as the deep-pocketed', writes the publication. Tourists can see a huge amount of its highlights by taking great-value and time-saving flights along the country’s Historic Route. This astonishing journey includes the Lake Tana monasteries and the Blue Nile Falls, the rock-hewn wonders of Lalibela and much more, writes Lonely Planet.


Ethiopia opens Africa's largest wind farm to boost power production
(Reuters) - Africa's biggest wind farm began production in Ethiopia on Saturday, aiding efforts to diversify electricity generation from hydropower plants and help the country become a major regional exporter of energy. The Horn of Africa country - plagued by frequent blackouts - plans to boost generating capacity from 2,000 MW to 10,000 MW within the next three to five years, much of it coming from the 6,000 MW Grand Renaissance Dam under construction on the Nile.


Real wildcatters go to Ethiopia to hunt for oil
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia, Oct. 25 (UPI) -- Amid East Africa's oil and gas boom, the more adventurous oilmen are starting to gravitate toward the vast Ogaden desert region of Ethiopia, where drilling activity has been sparse since rebels attacked an exploration team in 2007, killing nine Chinese and 65 Ethiopians. Initial estimates are that Ethiopia has oil reserves of around 2.7 billion barrels. That's a modest enough total in global terms, but it's a potential bonanza for an impoverished state like Ethiopia, which has been land-locked since Eritrea broke away to form an independent state on the Red Sea in 1991 after a 30-year separatist war.


Dear Professor Ghelawdewos, I just read your review of the fascinating book Tower in the Sky by Hiwot Teffera. Incidentally, I came across it right after I finished reading the book, which I acquired a few days ago. As many were happy to see those brilliant young boys after years of absence just a few days earlier, this unexpected cruel act shocked the entire town. I always remember them, as they used to come to play football to our place in the good days preceding the red terror. They could really play football. Having heard of 'mercy' offered by the regime, I was then hopeful to see them in the university soon as they were some of the outstanding students of the time. I hoped, they would one day free their parents from destitution. It was all nightmare. I have no idea what thereafter happened to their parents, whose hopes had been dashed cruelly and forever.


Ethiopia opens Africa's largest wind farm to boost power production
(Reuters) - Africa's biggest wind farm began production in Ethiopia on Saturday, aiding efforts to diversify electricity generation from hydropower plants and help the country become a major regional exporter of energy. The Horn of Africa country - plagued by frequent blackouts - plans to boost generating capacity from 2,000 MW to 10,000 MW within the next three to five years, much of it coming from the 6,000 MW Grand Renaissance Dam under construction on the Nile.


East Africa’s 5 dollar billionaires and 55 million poor people
By PAUL REDFERN and JEFF OTIENO | Sunday, October 13 

Economists said the widening of the income inequality gap has become the Achilles’ heel of the region’s ambitious growth projects as wealth continued to be concentrated among the rich.
The numbers of people living in absolute poverty — less than $1.25 a day — across East Africa remains high, with Burundi and Tanzania having the highest percentage (at over 81 and 67 per cent respectively) and Ethiopia and Uganda (at 30 and 38 per cent respectively), the lowest in the region, according to the World Bank statistics compiled between 2005 and 2012.


Ethiopia signs US$4b geothermal deal
Source: AFP

Ethiopia signed a US$4 billion deal Wednesday with American-Icelandic company Reykjavik Geothermal to develop a 1000-megawatt geothermal farm, officials said.
ADDIS ABABA: Ethiopia signed a US$4 billion deal Wednesday with American-Icelandic company Reykjavik Geothermal to develop a 1000-megawatt geothermal farm, officials said.
When completed, the project to provide energy for both local consumption and export will be the largest source of foreign direct investment in Ethiopia.


Ethiopia bans citizens from traveling abroad for work
Source: BBC

Ethiopia's government has temporarily banned its citizens from traveling abroad to look for work, the state-run Erta news agency reports. The foreign ministry was quoted as saying countless Ethiopians had lost their lives or undergone untold physical and psychological trauma because of illegal human trafficking. The decision was meant to "safeguard the well-being of citizens", it added.
The travel ban will remain in place until a "lasting solution" is found. The ministry said the government had taken various measures to limit the suffering of its citizens, including setting up a national council and a taskforce to educate them.


Reposted for the 75th Anniversary of Italy's Fascist Crimes in Ethiopia.

Revisiting Fascist Italy's Crime in Ethiopia

Ghelawdewos Araia

This essay will make a brief historical synopsis and analysis of the crimes perpetrated by the Italian fascists against the Ethiopian people in the 1930s. At this particular juncture, it may sound ironic to revisit the crimes against humanity committed in Ethiopia by Fascist henchmen like Marshall Pietro Badoglio and Marshal Rodolfo Graziani, but sometimes the past contends with the present especially if justice has not been served and no official apologies extended by state and/or religious leaders of the perpetrator nation.This essay is also aimed at reinforcing the Global Alliance for Ethiopia, a group of Ethiopians’ initiative in an effort to convince the Vatican and Pope Benedict XVI to apologize to Ethiopians as he has done to the Jews in Germany with respect to the Holocaust committed by the Nazis. As a matter of fact, one of the members of the Global Alliance for Ethiopia, Ato Kidane Alemayehu has written a letter to the Holiness Pope Benedict XVI (Vatican_Apology_to_Ethiopia.doc) but to this day no answer was given.


Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan Mull New Probe Nile Dam Impact
By William Davison

Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt agreed to examine the regional impact of a $4.2 billion dam being built on a Nile river tributary in Ethiopia after experts said earlier studies were inconclusive.
A meeting of water ministers and delegates in Sudan’s capital, Khartoum, on Nov. 4 will discuss conducting a new study of the hydropower project’s downstream effect and more detailed appraisals of its environmental and social impact, said Fekahmed Negash, head of the Ethiopian Water Ministry’s Boundary and Transboundary Rivers Affairs Directorate.


Eritrea teetering on the brink 
By Chamara Sumanapala 

With a coastline of 600 miles, Eritrea occupies an important place in the Red Sea. It even takes its name from the Latin term for Red Sea, Mare Erythraeum. After a three decade long war of independence with Ethiopia, Eritrea overwhelmingly voted for independence in April, 1993. After just over 20 years, some analysts fear that Eritrea is on the verge of collapse. Eritrea is a nation of six million people belonging to nine officially recognized ethnic groups. Roughly half the population is Sunni Muslim and the other half belongs to several Christian denominations. 


Ethiopia unveils telescope in first phase of space programme
Source: AFP

Addis Ababa — Ethiopia unveiled Friday the first phase of a space exploration programme, which includes East Africa's largest observatory designed to promote astronomy research in the region.
"The optical astronomical telescope is mainly intended for astronomy and astrophysics observation research," said observatory director Solomon Belay.
The observatory, which will formally be opened on Saturday, boasts two telescopes, each one metre (over three feet) wide, to see "extra planets, different types of stars, the Milky Way, and deep galaxies," Solomon added.


Ethiopia Gears Up To Emulate China, Vietnam And South Korea In Factory Output
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia -- From the outside, the China-Africa Overseas Leather Products tannery looks eerily idle. Long white buildings with blue-tinted windows surround a nearly empty parking lot, and the facility is so quiet you can hear the fluttering of the Chinese and Ethiopian flags out front.
But inside the gate and down past the office buildings -- where many of the Chinese employees work and live -- is a collection of massive workshops, and there you can hear the whirr of machinery as animal hides are soaked, threshed, tanned, shaved, colored and finished. About 450 Ethiopian workers are there to move things along.


Ethiopia, Egypt Set to Start Talks Over $4.3 Bln Dam Row
October 16, 2013 at 9:23am

*Addis Ababa, which is fully funding the project, has pledged to sell excess power to Egypt.
By Nicholas Bariyo, WSJ.com
Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan will hold discussions next week over the impact of a new $4.3 billion hydro power plant along the river Nile, which Egypt fears will hurt water supply to its 84 million people. "The meeting is scheduled to take place...on Oct. 22, 2013 between officials of the three countries," the Ethiopian foreign ministry said in a statement. The meeting will be the first since experts submitted their recommendations on the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam project more than three months ago. Egypt fears the 6,000 megawatt plant is likely to hurt its water supply when it comes on-stream around 2017. Majority of the Egyptian population is centered near the Nile valley and the desert nation depends on the river for around 95% of its water.


Tower In The Sky 
Authored by Hiwot Teffera 

Addis Ababa University Press, 2012 
Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD 
October 17, 2013 

Tower In The Sky wholly and thoroughly examines the struggles of the EPRP in a very lucid and cogent way, but not only in terms of narrating the complex Ethiopian politics of the time and praising the fallen heroes in due course of the struggle, but also in criticizing the shortcomings and failures of the Party. Hiwot Teffera eloquently captures in a dramatic fashion EPRP’s clandestine operations from the outburst of the Ethiopian Revolution in 1974 to her incarceration and her release in 1986. 


Is the Horn of Africa facing another collapsing state?
AljazeeraAljazeera – Tue, Oct 15, 2013..

Is the Horn of Africa facing another collapsing state?
Is the Horn of Africa facing another collapsing state?
Just as the Horn of Africa is witnessing the slow restoration of one collapsed state - after more than two decades of anarchic conditions in Somalia - it may be facing the collapse of another.
The small country of Eritrea, only 20 years after gaining independence from Ethiopia, has emerged as one of the largest sources of refugees in Africa - as well as one of the most militarised societies in the world. It is increasingly displaying signs of withering state structures and an unsustainable humanitarian situation. The Eritrean state has, since a 1998 border war with Ethiopia, been caught in a negative spiral of autocracy and deteriorating conditions. President Isaias Afewerki - the only leader this young nation has known - used the threat posed by Ethiopia as a pretext to eliminate all domestic opposition and indefinitely defer implementing the constitution and holding elections.


The International Criminal Court and African Leaders’ Concern 
IDEA Editorial

October 11, 2013
The precursor to the International Criminal Court (ICC) is the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 that was called upon by the Commission of Responsibilities. The Paris Conference initiative to establish an international tribunal, however, did not gain currency until the League of Nations addressed the issue again on November 1937, in which only thirteen countries signed but the idea of finding a permanent international tribunal was not ratified. Nevertheless, the idea persisted and this time it was precipitated by the Nuremberg Trials and the Tokyo Tribunals presided over by the Allied Forces following WWII. By 1950, the UN General Assembly was poised to establish an international tribunal, but this initiative too was circumvented by the Cold War. 


African Union summit opens with attack on ICC
By ANDUALEM SISAY in Addis Ababa | Friday, October 11

Ethiopia’s Foreign Affairs minister Tedros Adhanom has condemned the manner of trial of Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta and his Deputy William Ruto by International Criminal Court (ICC).
Mr Tedros said the demand for the two to attend all the court proceedings at The Hague was a threat against Kenya’s sovereignty. “ICC’s decision does not only undermine the ability of the Kenyan leaders in the discharge of their constitutional responsibilities, but also poses significant threats against the country's sovereignty,” said Mr Tedros, in his address to the African ministers gathered in Addis Ababa Friday.


Special Report: The Darfur conflict's deadly gold rush
By Ulf Laessing

KHARTOUM | Tue Oct 8, 2013 8:17am EDT 
(Reuters) - With its scrubland, unpaved roads and mud brick huts, the Jebel Amer area in Darfur, western Sudan, can look like a poor and desolate place. Under the ground, though, lies something sought by people everywhere: gold. In the past year or so the precious metal has begun to alter the nature of the decade-old conflict in Darfur, transforming it from an ethnic and political fight to one that, at least in part, is over precious metal. Fighting between rival tribes over the Jebel Amer gold mine that stretches for some 10 km (six miles) beneath the sandy hills of North Darfur has killed more than 800 people and displaced some 150,000 others since January. Arab tribes, once heavily armed by the government to suppress insurgents, have turned their guns on each other to get their hands on the mines. Rebel groups that oppose the government also want the metal.


Ethiopian premier says Hague court has 'double standards'
By Aaron Maasho and Edmund Blair

ADDIS ABABA | Thu Oct 10, 2013 3:19pm EDT 
(Reuters) - The International Criminal Court has shown "double standards" by pursuing only Africans so far and should defer trials of Kenya's leaders or take other steps so they can fulfill their elected offices, Ethiopia's prime minister said on Thursday. Hailemariam Desalegn was speaking before an African Union summit in Addis Ababa that will discuss relations with the court which has convicted only one man, an African warlord. The only others charged are also Africans.


Paris-based radio broke shipwreck news to Eritreans
By AFP | Thursday, October 10 2013

When tragedy struck off Italy's coast last week, it was a Paris-based radio station that broke the news to Eritrea, home to a majority of the 300-plus men, women and children feared dead in the shipwreck. State media in the tiny Horn of Africa nation made no mention of the Eritrean nationals who perished last Thursday near the southern island of Lampedusa. Their boat caught fire in the worst recent migrant disaster in the Mediterranean. That came as no surprise from a country where former rebel leader turned president Issaias Afeworki has ruled with an iron fist for two decades, prompting a steady exodus of refugees. The country ranked last below North Korea in a global survey on press freedom by media watchdog Reporters Without Borders (RSF). According to the United Nations, about 3,000 people flee Eritrea every month.But for staffers at Radio Erena, an independent radio station set up in 2009 with backing from RSF, covering the tragedy was "almost a personal mission," said its chief Biniam Simon.


Over 1 million Ethiopians 'graduate' from poverty 
By ANDUALEM SISAY in Addis Ababa | Wednesday, October 9

Over one million Ethiopians were lifted out of poverty within a year from July 2012 to end of June 2013 fiscal year, said the government. The development, explained the State Minister of Finance and Economic Development, Dr Abraham Tekestea, was due to the 9.7 per cent economic growth the country registered last year. The minister was briefing the media in his office Wednesday about Ethiopia's economic performance during the last fiscal year ended July, 7, 2013. “As a result of the 9.7 per cent GDP growth rate we registered last year, we are able to lift over one million people out of poverty,” he said. “Our growth is broad-based and the GDP growth we registered last year is above the minimum requirement to halve poverty as indicated in the Millennium Development Goals. It is also above the sub-Saharan GDP growth,” added the minister. He disclosed that currently, Ethiopia's GDP per capita had reached $550 from $510 last year, while the country’s GDP was $47 billion.


  Political Socialization in the era of Globalization in Ethiopian Schools

Desta, Asayehgn, Ph. D. Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development 
Abstract:

In contrast to other socialization agencies such as the family, peer groups, religious institutions and the tribal elders, and mass media, there is no doubt that schooling commands nearly undivided attention of students for long hours over many years and remains the most controllable channel for important cognitive and affective political socialization. During Haile Selassie’s regime (1930-1974) in Ethiopia, in addition to regarding education as one of the major players for training and the development of human resources essential for economic growth, the overarching goal of public schooling has been to build national pride, a strong common national identity dominated by one ethnic group, obedience to rules and laws, and the development of respect espousing legitimacy for government and the political institution.  In keeping with the socialist slogan pursued by the Military Junta from 1974-1991, Ethiopian schools, under the threat of the gun, were assigned to instill Ethiopian nationalism in order to create socialistic-minded Ethiopians under their authoritarian, military rule.  Galvanized by the mass terror in Ethiopia under the leadership of the Derg, eventually, the various ethnic groups, preserved through decades of cultural persecution, economic,....


Mayor Mike McGinn at Tigrai Community Fundraising event         

By Ethiopian Observer editor Bereket Kiros                                        

An amazing gala and a colorful fundraising for Tigrai Community event that depicts Ethiopian diversity was concluded yesterday with the presence of City of Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn along with his wife Peg Lynch, Deputy Mayor of Community Darryl Smith, the Honorable Ambassador Zerihun Retta Counsul General of Ethiopia at Los Angeles, and other high ranking officials from City of Seattle. As he ushered to the podium accompanied by community representative for the event Abel Girmay and Tigrai community chairman Addisu Bahta the audience was electrifying with standing ovation.  Indeed Mayor Mike McGinn is a true defender and advocate of immigrant and refugee communities in Seattle. 

Video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iHIXrUDb9w&feature=youtu.be


Viewers Open Wallets After 'World News' Report on $11 Cure That Lets Some Blind See
Erin McLaughlin More from Erin »Oct. 3, 2013 

An American doctor has been overwhelmed with donations from viewers who want to give the gift of sight to the millions in the developing world who live in darkness, after ABC's "World News" reported Wednesday on the doctor's efforts in Africa.  In fact, $139,186 was donated in the first 24 hours after ABC News' report, according to the Himalayan Cataract Project, enough to buy 12,653 lenses for patients with cataract blindness. "Thank you so much to all the viewers. Your donations mean thousands more surgeries will now be possible," said Job Heintz, of the Himalayan Cataract Project. "Patients will receive sight restoring surgery thanks to your story." 


Ethiopia: More Arrests in High Profile Corruption Case
By Elleni Araya, 29 September 2013 

Gebreselassie Hailemariam, a.k.a Aleqa Gebreselassie - owner of the COMET Building in the Hayahulet Mazoria area in Bole District, and father of Yemane Gebreselassie, who owns the new Capital Hotel & Spa on Haile Gebreselassie Avenue- was arrested three weeks ago, in connection with the current high profile corruption crackdown on the tax sector by the Federal Ethics & Anti Corruption Commission (FEACC). He has already been indicted and has joined other high profile officials in prison, Fortune confirmed from investigators. He joins the ranks of other high profile businessmen arrested over the last four months. It started with Nega Gebregziabehere, shareholder in Netsa Trading Plc; Simachew Kebede, part-owner of the Intercontinental Hotel, and Ketema Kebede, shareholder in K.K Plc, all of whom were arrested in May.


Battling brain drain: Training doctors in Ethiopia

Senait Fisseha leads a new initiative to train Ethiopian doctors. Credit: William Foreman
Brain drain is so severe in Ethiopia that the nation's health minister has complained there are more Ethiopian doctors in Chicago than in his own country. The good news is that the East African nation has one of the world's fastest-growing economies and is recovering from the nightmare decades of civil war and famine. Tackling the health care crisis is high on the priority list of the government, which has opened 13 new medical schools in the last two years. But training the doctors is still a huge challenge. One physician who is playing a key role in Ethiopia's bold medical initiative is Senait Fisseha, an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Michigan. She's leading a U-M effort to develop a postgraduate training program for doctors of obstetrics and gynecology that is fast-becoming a national model for Ethiopia.


Ethiopia: 2015 Diversity Visa Program Registration

September 30, 2013 – The U.S. Embassy in Addis Ababa is please to share, below, the Department of State announcement for the 2015 Diversity Visa Program (DV-2015). Ethiopia is an eligible country for DV-2015. DV-2015 applicants must submit entries online to the website address below. There is no charge for applications. Persons or entities that represent themselves as authorized agents of the U.S. Government and that charge a fee to submit applications or provide other services are fraudulent.


Eritrea: Dozens of Eritrean Mutineers Killed Says Army Deserter
30 September 2013 

Shire — An Eritrean soldier who recently fled to Ethiopia has alleged that many of the dissident soldiers who in January laid siege at the ministry of information building in the capital Asmara have been killed. Over 100 Eritrean dissident soldiers on January 21, 2013 stormed and took control of the ministry of information in Asmara and called for political reform and a return to the country's 1997 constitution. The day-long mutiny ended after Special Forces loyal to President Isaias Afeorki surrounded the building and the mutineers agreed to release hostages and to peacefully return to their base. The Eritrean army deserter who refused to be named for fear of reprisal against his relatives back in Asmera, said most of the mutineers were arrested days after their failed mutineer.


Water Wars: Egyptians Condemn Ethiopia's Nile Dam Project
As the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam takes shape, tempers rise.

Peter Schwartzstein in Cairo
National Geographic

"Ethiopia is killing us," taxi driver Ahmed Hossam said, as he picked his way through Cairo's notoriously traffic-clogged streets. "If they build this dam, there will be no Nile. If there's no Nile, then there's no Egypt." Projects on the scale of the $4.7 billion, 1.1-mile-long (1.7-kilometer-long) Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam often encounter impassioned resistance, but few inspire the kind of dread and fury with which most Egyptians regard plans to dam the Blue Nile River.The dam is now 20 percent built, and on schedule to be completed by 2017, according to Ethiopian officials. The Grand Renaissance Dam, it seems, is going to get built. But what happens next depends on how Egypt adjusts to its changed circumstances.
"Egypt needs to wake up to the new world," Verhoeven said. "This doesn't need to be a problem."

 

Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan Mull New Probe Nile Dam Impact
By William Davison

Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt agreed to examine the regional impact of a $4.2 billion dam being built on a Nile river tributary in Ethiopia after experts said earlier studies were inconclusive.
A meeting of water ministers and delegates in Sudan’s capital, Khartoum, on Nov. 4 will discuss conducting a new study of the hydropower project’s downstream effect and more detailed appraisals of its environmental and social impact, said Fekahmed Negash, head of the Ethiopian Water Ministry’s Boundary and Transboundary Rivers Affairs Directorate.


Eritrea teetering on the brink 
By Chamara Sumanapala 

With a coastline of 600 miles, Eritrea occupies an important place in the Red Sea. It even takes its name from the Latin term for Red Sea, Mare Erythraeum. After a three decade long war of independence with Ethiopia, Eritrea overwhelmingly voted for independence in April, 1993. After just over 20 years, some analysts fear that Eritrea is on the verge of collapse. Eritrea is a nation of six million people belonging to nine officially recognized ethnic groups. Roughly half the population is Sunni Muslim and the other half belongs to several Christian denominations. 


Ethiopia unveils telescope in first phase of space programme
Source: AFP

Addis Ababa — Ethiopia unveiled Friday the first phase of a space exploration programme, which includes East Africa's largest observatory designed to promote astronomy research in the region.
"The optical astronomical telescope is mainly intended for astronomy and astrophysics observation research," said observatory director Solomon Belay.
The observatory, which will formally be opened on Saturday, boasts two telescopes, each one metre (over three feet) wide, to see "extra planets, different types of stars, the Milky Way, and deep galaxies," Solomon added.


Ethiopia Gears Up To Emulate China, Vietnam And South Korea In Factory Output
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia -- From the outside, the China-Africa Overseas Leather Products tannery looks eerily idle. Long white buildings with blue-tinted windows surround a nearly empty parking lot, and the facility is so quiet you can hear the fluttering of the Chinese and Ethiopian flags out front.
But inside the gate and down past the office buildings -- where many of the Chinese employees work and live -- is a collection of massive workshops, and there you can hear the whirr of machinery as animal hides are soaked, threshed, tanned, shaved, colored and finished. About 450 Ethiopian workers are there to move things along.


Ethiopia, Egypt Set to Start Talks Over $4.3 Bln Dam Row
October 16, 2013 at 9:23am

*Addis Ababa, which is fully funding the project, has pledged to sell excess power to Egypt.
By Nicholas Bariyo, WSJ.com
Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan will hold discussions next week over the impact of a new $4.3 billion hydro power plant along the river Nile, which Egypt fears will hurt water supply to its 84 million people. "The meeting is scheduled to take place...on Oct. 22, 2013 between officials of the three countries," the Ethiopian foreign ministry said in a statement. The meeting will be the first since experts submitted their recommendations on the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam project more than three months ago. Egypt fears the 6,000 megawatt plant is likely to hurt its water supply when it comes on-stream around 2017. Majority of the Egyptian population is centered near the Nile valley and the desert nation depends on the river for around 95% of its water.


Tower In The Sky 
Authored by Hiwot Teffera 

Addis Ababa University Press, 2012 
Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD 
October 17, 2013 

Tower In The Sky wholly and thoroughly examines the struggles of the EPRP in a very lucid and cogent way, but not only in terms of narrating the complex Ethiopian politics of the time and praising the fallen heroes in due course of the struggle, but also in criticizing the shortcomings and failures of the Party. Hiwot Teffera eloquently captures in a dramatic fashion EPRP’s clandestine operations from the outburst of the Ethiopian Revolution in 1974 to her incarceration and her release in 1986. 


Is the Horn of Africa facing another collapsing state?
AljazeeraAljazeera – Tue, Oct 15, 2013..

Is the Horn of Africa facing another collapsing state?
Is the Horn of Africa facing another collapsing state?
Just as the Horn of Africa is witnessing the slow restoration of one collapsed state - after more than two decades of anarchic conditions in Somalia - it may be facing the collapse of another.
The small country of Eritrea, only 20 years after gaining independence from Ethiopia, has emerged as one of the largest sources of refugees in Africa - as well as one of the most militarised societies in the world. It is increasingly displaying signs of withering state structures and an unsustainable humanitarian situation. The Eritrean state has, since a 1998 border war with Ethiopia, been caught in a negative spiral of autocracy and deteriorating conditions. President Isaias Afewerki - the only leader this young nation has known - used the threat posed by Ethiopia as a pretext to eliminate all domestic opposition and indefinitely defer implementing the constitution and holding elections.


The International Criminal Court and African Leaders’ Concern 
IDEA Editorial

October 11, 2013
The precursor to the International Criminal Court (ICC) is the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 that was called upon by the Commission of Responsibilities. The Paris Conference initiative to establish an international tribunal, however, did not gain currency until the League of Nations addressed the issue again on November 1937, in which only thirteen countries signed but the idea of finding a permanent international tribunal was not ratified. Nevertheless, the idea persisted and this time it was precipitated by the Nuremberg Trials and the Tokyo Tribunals presided over by the Allied Forces following WWII. By 1950, the UN General Assembly was poised to establish an international tribunal, but this initiative too was circumvented by the Cold War. 


African Union summit opens with attack on ICC
By ANDUALEM SISAY in Addis Ababa | Friday, October 11

Ethiopia’s Foreign Affairs minister Tedros Adhanom has condemned the manner of trial of Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta and his Deputy William Ruto by International Criminal Court (ICC).
Mr Tedros said the demand for the two to attend all the court proceedings at The Hague was a threat against Kenya’s sovereignty. “ICC’s decision does not only undermine the ability of the Kenyan leaders in the discharge of their constitutional responsibilities, but also poses significant threats against the country's sovereignty,” said Mr Tedros, in his address to the African ministers gathered in Addis Ababa Friday.


Special Report: The Darfur conflict's deadly gold rush
By Ulf Laessing

KHARTOUM | Tue Oct 8, 2013 8:17am EDT 
(Reuters) - With its scrubland, unpaved roads and mud brick huts, the Jebel Amer area in Darfur, western Sudan, can look like a poor and desolate place. Under the ground, though, lies something sought by people everywhere: gold. In the past year or so the precious metal has begun to alter the nature of the decade-old conflict in Darfur, transforming it from an ethnic and political fight to one that, at least in part, is over precious metal. Fighting between rival tribes over the Jebel Amer gold mine that stretches for some 10 km (six miles) beneath the sandy hills of North Darfur has killed more than 800 people and displaced some 150,000 others since January. Arab tribes, once heavily armed by the government to suppress insurgents, have turned their guns on each other to get their hands on the mines. Rebel groups that oppose the government also want the metal.


Ethiopian premier says Hague court has 'double standards'
By Aaron Maasho and Edmund Blair

ADDIS ABABA | Thu Oct 10, 2013 3:19pm EDT 
(Reuters) - The International Criminal Court has shown "double standards" by pursuing only Africans so far and should defer trials of Kenya's leaders or take other steps so they can fulfill their elected offices, Ethiopia's prime minister said on Thursday. Hailemariam Desalegn was speaking before an African Union summit in Addis Ababa that will discuss relations with the court which has convicted only one man, an African warlord. The only others charged are also Africans.


Paris-based radio broke shipwreck news to Eritreans
By AFP | Thursday, October 10 2013

When tragedy struck off Italy's coast last week, it was a Paris-based radio station that broke the news to Eritrea, home to a majority of the 300-plus men, women and children feared dead in the shipwreck. State media in the tiny Horn of Africa nation made no mention of the Eritrean nationals who perished last Thursday near the southern island of Lampedusa. Their boat caught fire in the worst recent migrant disaster in the Mediterranean. That came as no surprise from a country where former rebel leader turned president Issaias Afeworki has ruled with an iron fist for two decades, prompting a steady exodus of refugees. The country ranked last below North Korea in a global survey on press freedom by media watchdog Reporters Without Borders (RSF). According to the United Nations, about 3,000 people flee Eritrea every month.But for staffers at Radio Erena, an independent radio station set up in 2009 with backing from RSF, covering the tragedy was "almost a personal mission," said its chief Biniam Simon.


Over 1 million Ethiopians 'graduate' from poverty 
By ANDUALEM SISAY in Addis Ababa | Wednesday, October 9

Over one million Ethiopians were lifted out of poverty within a year from July 2012 to end of June 2013 fiscal year, said the government. The development, explained the State Minister of Finance and Economic Development, Dr Abraham Tekestea, was due to the 9.7 per cent economic growth the country registered last year. The minister was briefing the media in his office Wednesday about Ethiopia's economic performance during the last fiscal year ended July, 7, 2013. “As a result of the 9.7 per cent GDP growth rate we registered last year, we are able to lift over one million people out of poverty,” he said. “Our growth is broad-based and the GDP growth we registered last year is above the minimum requirement to halve poverty as indicated in the Millennium Development Goals. It is also above the sub-Saharan GDP growth,” added the minister. He disclosed that currently, Ethiopia's GDP per capita had reached $550 from $510 last year, while the country’s GDP was $47 billion.


  Political Socialization in the era of Globalization in Ethiopian Schools

Desta, Asayehgn, Ph. D. Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development 
Abstract:

In contrast to other socialization agencies such as the family, peer groups, religious institutions and the tribal elders, and mass media, there is no doubt that schooling commands nearly undivided attention of students for long hours over many years and remains the most controllable channel for important cognitive and affective political socialization. During Haile Selassie’s regime (1930-1974) in Ethiopia, in addition to regarding education as one of the major players for training and the development of human resources essential for economic growth, the overarching goal of public schooling has been to build national pride, a strong common national identity dominated by one ethnic group, obedience to rules and laws, and the development of respect espousing legitimacy for government and the political institution.  In keeping with the socialist slogan pursued by the Military Junta from 1974-1991, Ethiopian schools, under the threat of the gun, were assigned to instill Ethiopian nationalism in order to create socialistic-minded Ethiopians under their authoritarian, military rule.  Galvanized by the mass terror in Ethiopia under the leadership of the Derg, eventually, the various ethnic groups, preserved through decades of cultural persecution, economic,....


Mayor Mike McGinn at Tigrai Community Fundraising event         

By Ethiopian Observer editor Bereket Kiros                                        

An amazing gala and a colorful fundraising for Tigrai Community event that depicts Ethiopian diversity was concluded yesterday with the presence of City of Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn along with his wife Peg Lynch, Deputy Mayor of Community Darryl Smith, the Honorable Ambassador Zerihun Retta Counsul General of Ethiopia at Los Angeles, and other high ranking officials from City of Seattle. As he ushered to the podium accompanied by community representative for the event Abel Girmay and Tigrai community chairman Addisu Bahta the audience was electrifying with standing ovation.  Indeed Mayor Mike McGinn is a true defender and advocate of immigrant and refugee communities in Seattle. 

Video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iHIXrUDb9w&feature=youtu.be


Viewers Open Wallets After 'World News' Report on $11 Cure That Lets Some Blind See
Erin McLaughlin More from Erin »Oct. 3, 2013 

An American doctor has been overwhelmed with donations from viewers who want to give the gift of sight to the millions in the developing world who live in darkness, after ABC's "World News" reported Wednesday on the doctor's efforts in Africa.  In fact, $139,186 was donated in the first 24 hours after ABC News' report, according to the Himalayan Cataract Project, enough to buy 12,653 lenses for patients with cataract blindness. "Thank you so much to all the viewers. Your donations mean thousands more surgeries will now be possible," said Job Heintz, of the Himalayan Cataract Project. "Patients will receive sight restoring surgery thanks to your story." 


Ethiopia: More Arrests in High Profile Corruption Case
By Elleni Araya, 29 September 2013 

Gebreselassie Hailemariam, a.k.a Aleqa Gebreselassie - owner of the COMET Building in the Hayahulet Mazoria area in Bole District, and father of Yemane Gebreselassie, who owns the new Capital Hotel & Spa on Haile Gebreselassie Avenue- was arrested three weeks ago, in connection with the current high profile corruption crackdown on the tax sector by the Federal Ethics & Anti Corruption Commission (FEACC). He has already been indicted and has joined other high profile officials in prison, Fortune confirmed from investigators. He joins the ranks of other high profile businessmen arrested over the last four months. It started with Nega Gebregziabehere, shareholder in Netsa Trading Plc; Simachew Kebede, part-owner of the Intercontinental Hotel, and Ketema Kebede, shareholder in K.K Plc, all of whom were arrested in May.


Battling brain drain: Training doctors in Ethiopia

Senait Fisseha leads a new initiative to train Ethiopian doctors. Credit: William Foreman
Brain drain is so severe in Ethiopia that the nation's health minister has complained there are more Ethiopian doctors in Chicago than in his own country. The good news is that the East African nation has one of the world's fastest-growing economies and is recovering from the nightmare decades of civil war and famine. Tackling the health care crisis is high on the priority list of the government, which has opened 13 new medical schools in the last two years. But training the doctors is still a huge challenge. One physician who is playing a key role in Ethiopia's bold medical initiative is Senait Fisseha, an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Michigan. She's leading a U-M effort to develop a postgraduate training program for doctors of obstetrics and gynecology that is fast-becoming a national model for Ethiopia.


Ethiopia: 2015 Diversity Visa Program Registration

September 30, 2013 – The U.S. Embassy in Addis Ababa is please to share, below, the Department of State announcement for the 2015 Diversity Visa Program (DV-2015). Ethiopia is an eligible country for DV-2015. DV-2015 applicants must submit entries online to the website address below. There is no charge for applications. Persons or entities that represent themselves as authorized agents of the U.S. Government and that charge a fee to submit applications or provide other services are fraudulent.


Eritrea: Dozens of Eritrean Mutineers Killed Says Army Deserter
30 September 2013 

Shire — An Eritrean soldier who recently fled to Ethiopia has alleged that many of the dissident soldiers who in January laid siege at the ministry of information building in the capital Asmara have been killed. Over 100 Eritrean dissident soldiers on January 21, 2013 stormed and took control of the ministry of information in Asmara and called for political reform and a return to the country's 1997 constitution. The day-long mutiny ended after Special Forces loyal to President Isaias Afeorki surrounded the building and the mutineers agreed to release hostages and to peacefully return to their base. The Eritrean army deserter who refused to be named for fear of reprisal against his relatives back in Asmera, said most of the mutineers were arrested days after their failed mutineer.


 Lazio Region.

Note: The Egyptian Air Force is the 4th largest F-16 operator in the world, mustering about 195 F-16s of 220 ordered. Their overall fighter fleet is a mix of high-end F-16s and Mirage 2000s, low-end Chinese F-7s (MiG-21 copy) bought from the Chinese, a few F-4 Phantom II jets, and upgraded but very aged Soviet MiG-21s and French Mirage 5s


Tigray Women Association of Seattle
Invites Saturday May 30, 2015
Genesee Hall 4200 36th Ave. S 
Seattle, WA. 98118



Queen Sheba Schools Alumni Association and Friends – International Board


ህዝቢ ትግራይ ምስ ህወሓት ኮይኑ
 ዘመዝገቦ መበል 40 ዓመት ናይ ቃልሲ
 ታሪክንካ ብታሪክቲ
ዝተዘለሉ


 


ማሕበር ተጋሩ ኣብ ሎስ አንጀልስን ከባቢኣን
“ናይ ሓዘን መግለጺ!”




A Lesson of History: - Dr. Gebrehiwot Baykedagn


The Unsung and Forgotten Ethiopian Heroes and Heroines 
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD February 4, 2015


ሄርማን ኮሆን ኣብ ጉዳያት ምርጫ ኢትዮጵያን ዓሰብን


May 31, 2014

Book Launching and Discussion on Contemporary Ethiopia

 

The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA) is proud to announce the launching of Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia’s book, Ethiopia: Democracy, Devolution of Power, and The Developmental State in Washington DC on June 28, 2014.

 

IDEA encourages all Ethiopians and scholars on Ethiopia in the Washington DC Metro Area to join the fascinating discussion on contemporary Ethiopia. Professor Haile Gerima will introduce the book signing ceremony and Dr. Araia will engage the audience in a lively and interactive intellectual discussion.

 

Venue: Sanfoka Video and Books, 2714 Georgia Ave, Washington DC 20001

Time: Saturday June 28 at 3 pm

TEACHERS COLLEGE | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
Vice President’s Office for Diversity and Community Affairs, Office of Alumni Affairs, African Alumni Club of Columbia University
A BOOK LAUNCH AND RECEPTION FOR
GHELAWDEWOS ARAIA, PH.D
A BOOK LAUNCH AND RECEPTION FOR
DR. GHELAWDEWOS ARAIA
FEATURING HIS BOOK:

International Tigray Festival 2014 in Tigray, July 31st to Aug. 6th.
Guest Registration Form - Please include all relevant information


Union of Tigreans in North America

ማሕበር ተጋሩ ሰሜን ኣሜሪካ



  

 

 

 

 

  




ኣባይ  በእርግጥ  ይገደባል


Radio snit January 26, 2014

Radio snit Professor Medhanye

Radio snit Sunday's program. January, 12, 2014

Radio snit Sunday's program.

January, 10, 2014

Radio snit Sunday's program.

January 5, 01, 2014


Radio snit Sunday's program.

December 31, 2013

Radio snit Sunday's program. 
December 22, 2013


Radio snit Sunday's program. 
December 14, 2013


Radio snit Sunday's program. 
December 8, 2013


        In memoriam
Professor Jemal Abdulkadir

Elias S Siraj, Ahmed Reja, and Solomon Tesfaye
On Saturday August 24th, 2013, the world diabetes community lost Professor Jemal Abdulkadir, a pioneer of diabetes care in his native country, Ethiopia and theAfrican continent.

Socialist wins seat on Seattle city council
November 16, 2013 

Seattle voters have elected a socialist to city council for the first time in modern history. Kshama Sawant, a member of the populist Occupy Seattle movement, ran on a platform of raising Washington State’s minimum wage to $15 and levying a “millionaire tax” to pay for mass transit and public education.


Ato Bekele Berhane’s Legacy will Live On

 It was devastating news on Wednesday, October 10, 2013, to learn that Ato Bekele Berhane, an alumni and one of the original founders of the Queen Sheba School, Adwa, Tigrai, Ethiopia, has passed away, surrounded by his brothers, sisters, children, and a number of friends.




Petition to Urge Representative Christopher Smith Stop his drive to introduce an Anti-Ethiopian Bill
(by Ethiopians for Peace and Development, Washington DC)


After graduation, I had the privilege of traveling to Mekelle, Ethiopia for an internship in medicine and dentistry


እንቅልፍ የት ኣባቱ!

ጠረንሽ ወረረኝ 

ምን ይሻለኛል


Radio Merhawit Streaming on the Internet

Courtesy of Tigray net

September 16, 2012 Sunday Program


Featured Article

Beyond Politics and Innuendo: Preserving Our Humanity and Salvaging Ethiopia from Moral Decadence 



The Legacy of Atse Yohannes IV  


Emperor Yohannes IV of Ethiopia

ATSE YOHANNES IV HIGH SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY


Atse Yohannes IV of Ethiopia crowned January 12 Born the son of Mercha the Shum of Tembien and his wife Woizero Silass Dimtsu (Amata Selassie) of Enderta, Dejazmatch Kassai could claim Solomonic blood through the line of his paternal grandmother 


 


 



 



Queen Sheba Schools Alumni Association and Friends - International is holding a fundraising event in Dallas Chapter





 


Security Council, by Vote of 13 in Favour, Adopts Resolution Reinforcing Sanctions Regime against Eritrea ‘Calibrated’ to Halt All Activities Destabilizing Region

Security Council Tightens Sanctions Regime on Somalia, Eritrea, Extending Mandate of Monitoring Group for 12 Months

Security Council Committee on Somalia and Eritrea Adds Two Individuals to List of Individuals and Entities

 




The Legend of the Great Drum (The “Negarit”)

By G.E.Gorfu


Views from our Ethiopia readers


Embassy Announces Winners of Four Freedoms Art Competition
U.S. Ambassador Booth
Announces Art Competition Awards of 100,000 Birr: Envisioning President Roosevelt's Four Freedoms Today


የኢትዮጵያ ፌዴራላዊ ዴሞክራሲያዊ መድረክ ካለፈው ምርጫ በኋላ ለመጀመሪያ ጊዜ እሁድ ዕለት መቀሌ ከተማ ውስጥ ሕዝባዊ ስብሰባ አካሄደ    


  ከአብራሃም ያየህ



እርምት ለሙሲ ፈልምና ለደራሲው ብረሃነ ኑጉሰ
ከአስገደ ገ/ስላሲ


አቶ ዘርአይ አስገዶም በሙስና ተነከሩ


የኢትዮጵያ ሕዝብ

እንዲያውቀ ከአስገደ ገ/ስላሲ


ያገረሽበት ታሪክ
ከአስገደ ገ/ስላሲ


ማነህ ባለተራ


Us embassy cables the-documents nuclear weapons


Question and Answer with G.E. Gorfu


Outbreak of Liver Disease in Ethiopia Tigrai Region

Amharic

 

In Tigringa   


  MP3


A book “Peace or War? Views on the Ethio-Eritrean Conflict”

Dr. Yohannes Kiros


 

 

 

 

 


  

            

      ሕልሚ ደርሁ!


TDA-NA DC Chapter is hosting a grand fund raising event


Ayder Memrial Library

Invites you to Fundraising

Saturday June 12, 2010


Older than Egypt is Ethiopia 
From distant past to the dawn of Islam, Gamal Nkrumah looks at the history of this African nation 

 

November 1, 2010 G. E. Gorfu

 

      እግ

        ጠላትህን ዕወቅ!

THROUGH MIDNIGHT
May 4, 2010 G. E. Gorfu


News

Eritrea desperate to undo UN sanctions
afrol News - Eritrea President Isaias Afewerki is on a diplomatic offensive to make the UN lift sanctions 

Eritrean rebels claim killing 11 government soldiers Source: East Africa Forum

Oxfam: Climate Change Devastating Ethiopian Rural Communities
April 23, 2010 Michael  VOA

Ethiopian opposition express discomfort over AU election observer mission

April 23, 2010 –APA/Afriqueavenir

Statement at the Conclusion of an IMF Mission to Ethiopia

Press Release No. 10/108  March 24, 2010

International Monetary and Financial Committee Statement

Twenty-First Meeting   April 24, 2010

  Aristotle-Philosophy

    Of   Politics III

 


Ayder Memorial Library Project fundraising event 


35th birthday of TPLF, Yekatit 11 Party in Minnesota


Kidan, Ethiopia

The Girl Effect

Eritrea Police Raid Church Service; Dozens Detained

Thursday, January 29, 2009 (10:02 am)

Prophet Muhammad and the culture of the oppressed

By: Nazim Baksh


    Iran Human Rights Documentation 

Gorfu

መገኘ አለበታ!

Aristotle and Politics II
G.E. Gorfu

   
ኦሪት

     Ferenge
  Amlaku 4,5,6,7 series

  Ferenj Amlaku I, 2,     series
      FETTERS OF LOVE

    

 
   
   
•    
Memories of student 

• 

•   

•     Bashai Awalom?

•     The Need for 

 

  By Ivan Simic   

War Trend Will Soon 
    January 28, 2009
World War II: 63 Years 
World War II: 63 

  Ivan Simic  
Millionaire? 

Georgia vs. Ossetia:

   Conflict to Major War

   Ivan Simic  August 11, 

Radovan Karadzic: One 

Deceptions of July 22,

Millionaire?  

•  Kosovo Brief

Alfred Nobel: 

By Tecola W. Hagos

EDITORIAL: Congratulations, President Barak   Obama, the 44th President of the United States of America January 19, 2009
Open Letter to the Brave Warriors of Ethiopia Returning Home From Somalia

By Tecola W. Hagos   January 5, 2009

 

From The Times February 5, 2009

Zimbabwe's MDC plan to extradite Mengistu Haile Mariam to Ethiopia


East Africa: UN Council Demands Eritrea Engage in Efforts to Resolve Dispute With Djibouti
14 January 2009

Et0126_2Vertical Ethiopia: Climbing Toward Possibility in the Horn of Africa

Right on the heels of our time with Surf Is Where You Find It author Gerry Lopez, we have more good book news to share with you this week.

    KELLY CLARKSON 

 

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